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Doctor Appointments Massachusetts Michigan

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  • Doctor Appointments Massachusetts Michigan

    I work Monday through Friday, 8am-5pm. Usually I schedule doctors appointments during my lunch hour, however I need to see a specialist that is over an hours drive from my workplace. My boss has told me that I can't have any time off for this appointment or any future ones. My company does not have Vacation or sick pay or any policies that I am aware of, are there any laws that entitle me to take the time off for this appointment? Please note that my boss is out anytime him or anyone in his family have appointments, birthdays anything!!! and I do not take any other time off, in fact I work on my days off and am on call nights to cover for him!!

  • #2
    No, I'm sorry, but there are no laws that require your employer to give you time off for doctor's appointments.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      How long have you worked there? How many hours have you worked in the past 12 months there? How many employees are within a 75 mile radius? Is this specialist treating you for a serious health condition?
      I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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      • #4
        Boy, I"m slipping. Working on almost 24 hours with no sleep.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          On a separate note (which I raise because the hours of work listed in your post exceed 40 per week, and it seems that this employer isn't interested in following the rules), are you being paid for all of your hours, or are you an exempt employee?


          .
          This post is by Philip Gordon, a Massachusetts employment attorney (www.gordonllp.com).

          This post is NOT legal advice. It is for general/educational information purposes only. You should not rely on this post if you are making decisions, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. This post may be considered "advertising" under the MA professional rules for attorneys.

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          • #6
            There are about 30 employees during peak season, and the corporation has units all over the country. I am not being treated for anything life threatening, just a re-occuring problem that needs to be dealt. I have worked here for over a little over a year now, 40+hrs a week/52 weeks a year. I am being paid for all hours worked.

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            • #7
              Based on the additional information, my original answer was correct. (The condition did not have to be life-threatening to count, but if there are not at least 50 employees within a 75 mile radius, the law Elle was thinking of does not apply.)
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Is this Michigan or Massachusetts?

                cbg, doesn't Massachusetts have a Small Necessities Act? If so, would this fall under it?
                I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                • #9
                  MA does, but this wouldn't.

                  First of all, the MA SNLA (first in the country) does not apply for your OWN doctor's appointments; only if you are escorting a child or a qualified relative over 60. Secondly, SNLA's eligibility mirrors FMLA's.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                  Comment

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