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Privacy in breakroom/work area

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  • Privacy in breakroom/work area

    We are a very small office of 8 people- our provided employee breakroom entails a long conference table in the middle of the room surrounded by our cubical with literally no privacy to eat/talk with co-workers on break - as anyone at their work cubical can hear.

    In the midst of needing some privacy to "chat" on my lunch hour with a co-worker, we opted to go into a "multi-use" conference room that we is use for counseling of our patients (we're a health center)- however at lunch time the room is vacant and has four walls and door to close. My boss has instructed me that I can no longer go behind closed doors to have lunch with co-workers on my break. Is there any regulations on breakrooms needing doors/walls or that employers should provide a place to have a private conversation?

    Please Advise !!
    Last edited by egasink; 08-21-2006, 02:22 PM. Reason: grammatical

  • #2
    Nope.

    Sorry, no law requires on the job privacy outside of the lavatory.
    Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

    I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

    Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

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    • #3
      With the possible exception of California, your employer is not required to provide you with a break room at all.

      I'm not aware of any law in any state that requires an employer to provide you with a place to have a private conversation.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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