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salaried employee cuts - do i ned to work 40 hours

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  • salaried employee cuts - do i ned to work 40 hours

    I work for a non profit in ny state, Due to budget issues, management has instituted a 4 day work week, and pay cut of 20% for all employees. This is an extremely busy time of year for all of us. Salaried, exempt staff have been advised that they may have to come in to pick up slack due to lower output of hourly staff, but our salaries have been cut as well.

    if we are salaried, Exempt. , are we still required to put in whatever amount of work is required to get the job done, even though we have been cut, or can we say, no I have been cut, I am not coming in on my "day off" (we have been through this before, and managers are very committed and coming in for "just one hour" usually means we are there for about 5..so it is a slippery slope, especailly, since there is a fear of being "written up" for not being able to get the wrok done, even though we are on a 4 day week...
    Please advise.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    All employees, exempt and non-exempt, are required to work the hours the employer expects them to work. Saying, No, I'm not coming in, is a really good way to get fired.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cbg View Post
      All employees, exempt and non-exempt, are required to work the hours the employer expects them to work. Saying, No, I'm not coming in, is a really good way to get fired.
      Agreed. If you are an FLSA exempt employee, the fact that they cut your pay has no necessary bearing on the issue of your workload. You're being paid to get a job done and you have two choices: "git 'er done" (as the philosopher, Larry the Cable Guy, says) or find a new job.

      Getting a pay cut is an unpleasant, unwanted experience but is becoming a too common necessity for many organizations in today's economy to survive. You can either focus on what you don't have (the extra pay you previously received) or what you do have (you still have a job, which is a lot more than many people in today's economy have).
      The only thing spammers are good for is target practice.
      No trees were destroyed in the sending of this message, but a bunch of electrons and phosphors have been a tad inconvenienced.

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      • #4
        I understand and appreciate the answers. One more question though. On a recent "audit" my department was penalized on a few issues but it was also noted on the report that the reason behind not being able to complete certain tasks was "severe understaffing". My quesiton then, is how does a person "protect" oneself from poor perfomrance issues. I am asking this on my behalf but as well as for my hourly staff who are concerned that they simply cannot get the work done that they need to do in 40 hours, let alone 32 (and I agree). They are asking for letters stating that management knows they can't get the wrok done, but it certainly wouldnt be a good idea to write a letter like that. I just tell them, do the best you can do. I am in the same boat, ...Also the Director's hours have not been cut, and that person is working a 2 day work week, but being paid for 5 days as part of an agreement (we aree NOT union) ...all seems very unfair. And I heard that from the director's mouth so it is not hearsay. Makes it tough to want to put in more hours than one is paid for when that is happening. Sorry to rant! I know , I know, ,,,at will, etc, if you don't like it leave, etc...but geeze!

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        • #5
          The fact of the matter is that you don't. It may be completely unfair, I'm not saying otherwise, but poor performance is simply not something you're protected against whether it's the company's fault for not providing you with enough staffing and materials, or whether it's your fault because you're not up to the job.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment

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