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Problems getting a Termination Notice Georgia

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  • Problems getting a Termination Notice Georgia

    I have had problems getting a Termination Notice from my past employer. I was let go the first of July and never received one. I was working in Georgia the Company was based in Florida. What is the law regarding this? Is there a time table that a Seperation Notice should be received? I have left repeated messages with the HR dept and my former supervisor. I need the termination Notice to apply for food stamps, If this keeps up who do I go to to get this notice?

  • #2
    It looks like separation notices are not required in Florida.

    http://www.laborlawtalk.com/showthre...t=88963&page=1

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    • #3
      She's not in Florida she's in Georgia, and I think such notices are required in Georgia. I just don't know how she can force her employer to give her one.

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      • #4
        Yes, she's in Georgia, but she stated the work was done by a company based in Florida, which is why I gave her the information about Florida.

        She should try to contact her office in Georgia, rather than the Florida HQ.

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        • #5
          Ga. requires a separation notice for the purpose of filing for state unemployment benefits. This notice is to be given at time of separation and is to list both the reason for termination and if any severance pay was given.

          OP worked in Ga.
          Last edited by Betty3; 09-12-2011, 10:29 AM.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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          • #6
            Misread, sorry.

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            • #7
              no problem
              Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

              Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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              • #8
                FYI, formal notification of separation is not required under federal law, and not required under the law of most states. GA is one of the very few states that has a formal requirement on this.

                For labor law, it almost never matters where a company is headquartered, and this is not one of the very few cases where that is true. The employee works in GA. The employer by legal definition is a GA employer fully subject to all GA labor laws. That is pretty much universal in all states. If an employer has employees working in a state, they are an employer of that state, even if they do not want to be. This is very basic labor law. If you do not want to be an employer in a state, then never have an employees there. (A variation on the "if you do not want to be a Daddy, keep it zipped up" rule).

                The closest thing you have in some states to an exception is some states are quicker to turn on state labor law to non-resident employees working temporarily working in state. No one-size-fits-all answer here. Some states non-residents employees can work in state a while without the WorkedState's labor laws kicking in. Other states not only kick in their labor laws very quickly (CA), but NY can apply labor laws to employees who never have physically been in NY if they decide that their weird "for the convenience of the employer" rule applies.

                But the employer is headquartered in ... is almost always a "who cares" in labor law. (But not necessarily under contract law).
                Last edited by DAW; 09-12-2011, 12:28 PM.
                "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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