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California Reduction in force w/options questions

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  • California Reduction in force w/options questions

    My position is being eliminated across the company and we have been presented with several options:

    1.) Accept another position within the company. This will result in a probable salary decrease and possibly a reduction in hours.

    2.) Interview for position with the 3rd party company that will be staffing my position and hope I get my job back. This could also result in a salary decrease and/or reduction in hours.

    3.) Severance.

    If I take option 3 would I qualify for unemployment?

  • #2
    The best answer anyone here can give you is, Maybe.

    If you are offered another position and turn it down, your chances are lower than if you are offered the opportunity to apply for another position and turn it down. But the state, and only the state, makes the final decision.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Agree. If you don't take a position offered & instead quit & take the severance,
      you "might" not get UI. However, only the state can make that decision as cbg
      noted.

      If you take another position with reduced hrs./pay, you might be able to get partial
      UI.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

      Comment


      • #4
        Update:

        I've applied to the company that my job will be outsourced to and depending on whether they hire me and/or the wages they offer me are acceptable I'll go from there. Partial unemployment IS an option here in CA.

        One thing that has come up in the interim is the severance package offered to me. I was offered a two week salary equivalent payment if I take a job with the outsourced company or I leave the company ON March 12th. From what I've heard the other company wants to have the transition complete prior to that date... and if I take a position with them it seems like I may forfeit my severance.

        Any advice?

        Comment


        • #5
          My only comment is that it is extremely common for severance to be forfeit if you accept a position elsewhere within the company, or with the acquiring company, or are working at all prior to the severance date. Severance is intended to make you whole during a period of unemployment caused by the layoff; it is not intended as a gift or windfall if you are earning a paycheck anyway.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment


          • #6
            Is two weeks worth of severance really worth no job? Or am I missing something?
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              I thought the same thing Patty if he really meant 2 wks. which is what he said.
              Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

              Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

              Comment

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