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I quit but was then "fired" can I collect? Massachusetts

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  • I quit but was then "fired" can I collect? Massachusetts

    I quit my job 7 weeks ago. The company I worked for is losing it's State contract at the end of the year so I was going to get laid off anyway at the end of the year.

    I got a new job at the company who was going to be taking over the contract.

    When I gave my two weeks notice at the old employer, I was asked to leave immediately. They did NOT pay me for the two weeks.

    I started the new job three weeks later. I will now be getting laid off at the new job as the State has changed their mind regarding the contract situation. The old job will get a contract extension.

    Will I be able to collect unemployment?

  • #2
    We have no idea, but the fact that you quit the first job 5 months before the contract was scheduled to end with Company A is not going to bode well for you. Were you receiving UI benefits before?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      No. I didn't receive UI before.

      To be fair, company B is actually a State Agency who was actively looking for experienced people for these positions. I took one and now State has changed their mind........

      Comment


      • #4
        Can't hurt to file. cbg knows more about MA UI than I do, and I'm sure she'll be by shortly to add more information.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          I'm leaning in the direction of yes, since the most recent end of termination was a layoff. But only the DUA can say for certain. By all means apply; there is no penalty for being wrong and it doesn't cost anything.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cbg View Post
            I'm leaning in the direction of yes, since the most recent end of termination was a layoff. But only the DUA can say for certain. By all means apply; there is no penalty for being wrong and it doesn't cost anything.
            Thanks. I am going to apply. I have only worked at the new employer for 4 weeks. That is why I am concerned.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aadam101 View Post
              Thanks. I am going to apply. I have only worked at the new employer for 4 weeks. That is why I am concerned.
              However long did you work for the company you quit?

              I agree with cbg that you have a good shot getting unemployment since you are laid off.

              I would expect your prior company to dispute the claim since you quit. The state may decide that you should receive unemployment but your former employer will not be charged.

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              • #8
                I worked for the other employee for three and a half years.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ok, you worked long enough so that you should meet the financial
                  requirements for UI. However, the unemployment ins. folks will make
                  the final decision as to whether you are entitled to UI in your case as
                  the other responders noted.
                  Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                  Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for everyones help. My unemployment was approved.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't be supirsed if you former employers appeal the state's decision. The ultimate answer is to continue to file and appeal any adverse decisions.
                      Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

                      I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

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                      • #12
                        Congratulations. However, as noted previously, your former employer
                        can contest the granting of benefits.
                        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                        Comment

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