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Can an employer do this Kansas

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  • Can an employer do this Kansas

    My husband has found a new job and is wanting to put in two weeks notice at his current job sinse he can't start the new job for two weeks anyway but the general manager said that whe he puts in hs two week written notice the district manager will probably take his keys and tell him they don't need him. is this legal for an employer in kansas to do?

  • #2
    That is legal for an employer in all 50 states to do. No Federal law and no law in any state prohibits an employer from accepting a resignation effective immediately. They are not required to allow him to work out his notice.

    Not how I'd handle it in most cases, but not illegal either.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      So should he give a two week notice then? Because we need him to work there untill his other job starts

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      • #4
        That's entirely his decision to make. A two weeks notice is a courtesy; it is not mandatory. On the other hand, the employer is free to inform prospective employers in future that he quit without notice.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          Now tht is just ridiculous they can make him leave right then if he gives two weeks but if he doesn't they an make it look bad to other employers he's on salary and that would make big difference if he wasn't able to work and get paid for those last two weeks

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          • #6
            Some employers pay the two weeks' pay when they choose to accept an employee's resignation effective immediately instead of in two weeks like the employee intends.

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            • #7
              Whether its ridiculous or not, it's still true.

              I can't make this decision for him, and I have no way of knowing if his employer will actually give this information out during reference checks or not. All I can tell you is that the possibility exists; the employer is allowed to give any information that is true, and if he does not give notice, it will be true. Whether the employer actually will do so or not, I can't say. Nor can I confirm that he will actually let him go immediately - all I can tell you is that it's legal if he does.

              I don't make the laws; I only tell you what they say. Getting mad at me doesn't make any of it illegal.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cbg View Post
                Whether its ridiculous or not, it's still true.

                I can't make this decision for him, and I have no way of knowing if his employer will actually give this information out during reference checks or not. All I can tell you is that the possibility exists; the employer is allowed to give any information that is true, and if he does not give notice, it will be true. Whether the employer actually will do so or not, I can't say. Nor can I confirm that he will actually let him go immediately - all I can tell you is that it's legal if he does.

                I don't make the laws; I only tell you what they say. Getting mad at me doesn't make any of it illegal.
                I think you misunderstood my post im not mad at you i have no reason to be im mad at the situation and the fact that there are not better laws pertaining to this to protect people who actually try and quit their jobs the right way

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                • #9
                  Caryn raises a good point; although an employer is not obligated by law to pay an employee for an unworked notice period, quite a few of them do. In fact, while it is rare that I have not allowed an employee to work out a notice, there have been a few times when circumstances have made it seem like the best thing all around and every employer I have ever worked for would pay an employee in that case.

                  Naturally, I can't say whether or not your husband's employer will do that either, but it's certainly not outside the realm of possibility.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                  • #10
                    Also, if his resignation is accepted immediately & he doesn't get paid for the two weeks, some states will pay unemployment ins. for that time off though there may be a one week waiting period.

                    Does he know of anyone else who quit the employer with two weeks notice and how it was handled?
                    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

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