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Long term employees fired Michigan

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  • Long term employees fired Michigan

    A week ago, 10 employees were called in for a private meeting with the plant manager and the HR person. At the meeting, they were told that their positions had been eliminated and they were no longer employed by the company. Among the employees fired were 3 salaried employees and 7 hourly workers. Among these workers, all but 3 were over 40 years old. One was Muslim and one was slow and incompetent. One worker had 34 yrs at this place where he'd worked his way up to manufacturing manager. He'd never been written up for anything and had an exemplary work ethic and work record. Two workers were within months of retirement and also had exemplary work records. Six of said employees had over 15 yrs at this place of employment. They had all received yearly wage or salary increases and never had a bad review. This is a small manufacturing facility with around 50 employees altogether, including management.
    I realize they work "at will" but don't long term employees have a general expectation of continuing their employment with a company based on the company's past behavior? Good faith? They have always laid off workers from the bottom, never terminated long term employees before.
    They were heartless in this termination, giving no warning whatsoever, and treating them as though they'd done something wrong, although they know they didn't. They were given a few minutes to gather their personal items and then escorted off the premises. A worker who resigned the week before, after 1 yr's employment, was given a party by the management team whereas these long term employees were basically told "get the hell out of here". The kicker is that 2 days later an ad showed up on a website advertising for 10 new employees. After HR was questioned about the ad, it disappeared from the online employment website. Also, remaining employees are now put on overtime to get the work done since the plant is short-handed now. Everyone is hurt, scared and angry, including the "survivors".
    madmatter
    Junior Member
    Last edited by madmatter; 01-19-2008, 07:18 AM. Reason: Changed number of employees there over 15 yrs

  • #2
    Did your employer retain any employees who were as old or older than the 40 & + who were laid off? Are those retained as a group younger than those laid off?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, there are a few older employees who've been retained, but they are very nervous.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by madmatter View Post
        A week ago, 10 employees were called in for a private meeting with the plant manager and the HR person. At the meeting, they were told that their positions had been eliminated and they were no longer employed by the company. Among the employees fired were 3 salaried employees and 7 hourly workers. Among these workers, all but 3 were over 40 years old. One was Muslim and one was slow and incompetent. One worker had 34 yrs at this place where he'd worked his way up to manufacturing manager. He'd never been written up for anything and had an exemplary work ethic and work record. Two workers were within months of retirement and also had exemplary work records. Six of said employees had over 15 yrs at this place of employment. They had all received yearly wage or salary increases and never had a bad review. This is a small manufacturing facility with around 50 employees altogether, including management.
        I realize they work "at will" but don't long term employees have a general expectation of continuing their employment with a company based on the company's past behavior? Good faith? They have always laid off workers from the bottom, never terminated long term employees before.
        They were heartless in this termination, giving no warning whatsoever, and treating them as though they'd done something wrong, although they know they didn't. They were given a few minutes to gather their personal items and then escorted off the premises. A worker who resigned the week before, after 1 yr's employment, was given a party by the management team whereas these long term employees were basically told "get the hell out of here". The kicker is that 2 days later an ad showed up on a website advertising for 10 new employees. After HR was questioned about the ad, it disappeared from the online employment website. Also, remaining employees are now put on overtime to get the work done since the plant is short-handed now. Everyone is hurt, scared and angry, including the "survivors".
        There is nothing that shouts out "illegal" here.

        Layoffs are never easy and are usually not expected.

        I don't know the reason for the rest... Laid off employees are not, legally, entitled to either prior notification, a specific amount of time to linger about the workplace after the norification and/or a party to see them off.
        Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

        I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

        Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

        Comment


        • #5
          I guess your answer is saying that hard-working, loyal and dedicated workers deserve no respect when they are terminated, either.
          Corporate America is sociopathic. Why do people even bother?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by madmatter View Post
            I guess your answer is saying that hard-working, loyal and dedicated workers deserve no respect when they are terminated, either.
            Don't read things that aren't there. Cyjeff never said that. Not everything is legislated. The LAW is what it is. You can always move.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

            Comment


            • #7
              I realize the law is what it is. But how do we change this? There is injustice here and regardless of what the law is, this is wrong. The only thing getting these people through this is the belief that what goes around comes around, for them as well as for the ones who've caused them such heartache and grief.

              And there is no good faith involved in long term employment?

              As for moving, these people have family and lives here. Anyone can move, I've done it dozens of times myself. But people with long term employment and family ties are not likely to be inclined to do so.

              Comment


              • #8
                I assure you that no employer wants valued long term employees to walk out the door.

                You asked if there was anything illegal done. There was not.

                I know it hurts... I have been on both sides of that decision and it stinks either way.

                However, there is nothing illegal in having a business downturn that requires a reduction in employees.
                Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

                I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

                Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

                Comment


                • #9
                  You lobby your state and/or federal legislators, just like you would if you wanted any other law. However, don't forget that businesses have lobbyists, too.
                  I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Maybe the way to go is to unionize...

                    Now that I said the magic word, Joe will be here in a second.
                    Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

                    I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

                    Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I most definitely will be writing the lawmakers, as others already have.
                      This company has always told their employees if they unionize that they will move out of the area. I believe they are in the middle of doing that right now anyway. Do they need to notify the remaining employees if that is in fact what is happening?

                      Another thing - these are good people and they will find other jobs. The jobs may not pay as much, but people adjust. But to treat people as though they are disposable is beyond belief to me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think that those who were laid off who were over 40 and/or nearing retirement and have good records with the company should seek consultation with an experienced employment law attorney to discuss whether they may have viable age discrimination claims.

                        Age discrimination and/or firing someone the keep their retirement from vesting are illegal. The scenario you have described sounds a bit suspicious to me. Except for laying off the slow, incompetent guy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If the company retained other older employees, and the poster says they did, that greatly weakens an age discrimination claim.
                          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It's still worth looking into, in my opinion, especially for the ones who were nearing retirement.

                            I know it doesn't have to follow the overall percentage of employees exactly, but 70% of the laid off employees were over 40. I'm guessing that the remaining workforce doesn't consist of 70% of employees over 40.

                            It can't hurt to call a lawyer for a consult.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by madmatter View Post
                              I most definitely will be writing the lawmakers, as others already have.
                              This company has always told their employees if they unionize that they will move out of the area. I believe they are in the middle of doing that right now anyway. Do they need to notify the remaining employees if that is in fact what is happening?

                              Another thing - these are good people and they will find other jobs. The jobs may not pay as much, but people adjust. But to treat people as though they are disposable is beyond belief to me.
                              You have to remember that "At-will" is a give and get.

                              Yes, it means that employees can be fired at any time. But it also means that they can pursue other jobs if their present employer doesn't feel right....at any time for any reason.

                              Sometimes, it seems like folks want employers to be legally bound to never fire an employee until the repo man shows up to get the copier. However, if they meet the recruiter for the competition at the Kwiky Mart and he offers them a job at double the salary, they should be able to jump in a minute without worrying about how that departure will effect the company.

                              Give and get.
                              Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

                              I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

                              Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

                              Comment

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