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Calling previous employers-Arizona

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  • Calling previous employers-Arizona

    I was wondering what the Arizona laws were for feedback from previous employers to potential employers were?

    For an example, is it against the law to say why i was terminated and to say aweful "lies" about me?

    My last employer, i left on real bad terms and i spent the last year working for them so i dont want to just take them off my resume.

    Another question, i was put on choicepoint.com which is a site employers look at...loss prevention told me it's a site that tells employers about theft or something and im on there. Yet i didnt exactly steal personally. Long story short i was stupid and wasnt thinking by giving a former employee 3 discounts that didnt equal more than $5 worth the discount.

    Is it right that my name is on there? I wasnt aware or given warnings that it was considered stealing, i guess that's just common sense yet i tend to lack that.

    thank you.

  • #2
    In all 50 states your employer may tell a reference checker anything that is true or anything they honestly believe to be true, even if unflattering. If you were terminated for giving discounts to those you should not have, yes that is a form of stealing and yes you could be legally terminated for it and yes they may tell others that is what happened.

    It is also legal for this Choicepoint site to have info on you. If it is inaccurate, you can challenge that information via the process indicated on the website. Keep in mind that not every employer is going to bother using this service.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      It is legal (in all 50 states) for an employer to say anything that is true (including the reason you were terminated); anything that they have a good faith belief is true, or anything that represents their honest and supportable opinion.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        that sucks, i just thought i'd ask because my friends were saying if anything other than "she was fired" was said to call a lawyer. But oh well, maybe i'll get lucky and find an employer who doesnt call.

        Thanks guys

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        • #5
          A great many people believe the myth that an employer is limited to dates of employment, job title and possibly salary. But that is all it is, a myth.

          It is never against the law to tell the truth. Tell your friends.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            Arizona law provides immunity to employers that provide references in good faith & have a practice of doing so. The law would cover what the previous posters posted.
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

            Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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