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A simple question Massachusetts

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  • A simple question Massachusetts

    Although I am no longer employed at my previous job there was a question that I wanted to ask on here that I just never got around to. So, I thought I would ask it now.

    This question pertains mainly to retail stores but any information would be helpful.

    I know when an employee is hired there is paperwork to be filled out and it gets filed accordingly. Is there any paperwork that gets filled out and or filed when a person quits or is fired? I know the employee who quits or gets fired doesnt have to fill anything out but does the manager? I assumed that something would need to be filed so that employee stops receiving a pay check but that could also happen from the payroll department no longer receiving a time card for that employee.

    Here is the situation that my question pertains to. Say an employee gets promoted to manager, soon after becoming manager X number of employees quit and X number of employees get fired. X = an overwhelming amount of employees for such a short period of time. Now the store has only a small fraction of employees compared to the time before the new manager was promoted. Would the new managers boss (district manager) or whoever it is find out that X number of employees are no longer working there? Or does it never get reported?

    Sorry for such a long post. I hope I worded everything clearly enough.

    Thank you

  • #2
    Someone has to fill out some type of paperwork, email, or other document so that the terminated employee gets recorded as such in the system and so that pay stops.

    Anything else (as well as the method used for the above) is completely up to the company.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      There is no paperwork that all employers, across the board, are required to fill out when someone is fired.

      What paperwork is required is entirely up to the company.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        Thank you both for your responses.

        With that being said, is it uncommon for a district manager (or whomever the managers boss is) to question the store manager as to why so many people no longer work there or have been let go in such a short time? Or, does the district manager not necessarily even know that X number of employees no longer work there?

        Thanks again

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        • #5
          Again, that is entirely company specific.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by frustrated_MA_employee View Post
            With that being said, is it uncommon for a district manager (or whomever the managers boss is) to question the store manager as to why so many people no longer work there or have been let go in such a short time? Or, does the district manager not necessarily even know that X number of employees no longer work there?
            Companies can be concerned about turnover (and should be).

            Depending upon how the HR and payroll systems are set up, figuring out turnover rates by location can be easy or a major pain.

            If tracking turnover is important, it is not hard to ignore the deficiencies of the automated systems and set up even a manual system.
            Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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