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  • New to hiring California

    I am new to the hiring field. I work for an Inventory company and am responsible for all the recruiting and hiring in my office. I do okay with the recuiting part but am struggling when it comes to the interview process. I tend to forget the questions I ask. I also feel like I should be asking more. Any suggestions would be greatly apprieciated.

    Larissa

  • #2
    It is hard to advise you as we don't know what you are currently asking. Are you having problems with the candidates you hire or realizing after the fact that there are things you should have asked about but didn't?

    I'd suggest typing up a list of the questions you want to ask candidates before your next interview and take it with you to the interview. That way, you aren't trying to remember what you wanted to ask about in the middle of the interview. I'd also take notes during the interview.

    Interviewing is a skill and if you are not comfortable with this part of the job, I'd look into training on interview techniques. Any of the national training companies out there will have sessions on this.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for replying so quickly!

      Right now, I ask 3 main questions

      1. Tell me about your last position, what were your responsibilities?

      2. Tell me about a time you had to work with a group to get a project completed. What was your role and how was the outcome?

      3. What is the worst thing your last employer would say about you.

      Generally our companies interviews are only suppose to last 10-15 min.

      At the conclution, I let them ask me any questions they want related to the position. Then I either offer them the position or let them know we will call them.

      Comment


      • #4
        What are your strengths?

        What are your weaknesses?

        What do you see yourself doing five years from now?

        What would your co-workers say about you?
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          I always like to ask the obvious- Why did you apply for this job and why do you want to work here? I'd much rather hire someone who is intersested in the job or at least the organization rather than someone who only applied becaue we had a vacancy.

          After explaining the job and requirements, I ask what part(s) their past experience have best prepared them for and how? I usualy also ask what areas they feel they will find a challenge though to be honest, I rarely get a decent answer on that one.
          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks! Im making a list

            Comment


            • #7
              This is some info I have - maybe some will be of interest/help to you.

              The following good interview questions will help you screen job candidates. You are looking to make sure the candidate is qualified, but also that they are a good fit for your organization. Here are the good interview questions employer:
              1. Why are you considering leaving your present job?
              or Why does our business interest you?
              What is your understanding of our business.

              2. Tell me in detail what you do/did at your past company.


              3. Of these various duties, which do/did you like best?


              4. Which did you like least?


              NOTE to questions 1-4: The purpose of these questions is to get the candidate to talk, enabling the interviewer to judge the suitability of experience, and whether they will like your job.

              5. What are your greatest strengths as a person?


              6. What are your greatest weaknesses as a person?


              NOTE to questions 5-6: Look for realistic quality of replies, their bearing upon job success, ability to “face” themselves versus denial of weakness.

              7. Are you generally lucky?
              NOTE: A seemingly strange, but good question. Not all will say “yes”. If they ask, “Lucky at what?” reply, “Just generally lucky.” Watch for the whiner or the “hard-luck” person.

              8. What other jobs are you applying for?
              NOTE: Some will say “none”, but look for replies indicating lack of focus to the applicant’s ambitions, or interest in other types of work.

              9. What type of person is hardest for you to deal with?


              10. Tell me about the boss you liked best?


              11. What sort of work would your spouse/family like to see you have?


              12. What would you like to be doing with this company--?
              in two years?
              in five years?

              NOTE: Watch for focus of ambitions and realistic quality of expectations in light of opportunities in the company.

              NOTE: The following two questions need careful handling. Never ask them at the start of an interview. Ask them casually, and they may tell you much.

              13. What is your spouse’s/family’s chief criticism of you?
              NOTE: Some will hesitate a long time. This calls for investigation of the person’s background. Some will say, “No criticism.” If so, go to the next questions.

              Those who talk often reveal a great deal of value. Some will confess drinking, gambling, or other problems. You never know.

              14. What is your chief criticism of your spouse/family?


              15. What do you think is the most important question you have been asked?


              REMEMBER Don’t waste time; If your turned off in five minutes, tell him/her you’ll be in touch if, etc. If your interest is high in pursuing him/her, continue the interview and sell the company and position to the interviewee.
              Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

              Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

              Comment


              • #8
                BTW, I meant to mention this earlier.

                I strongly, strongly, strongly recommend NEVER making an on-the-spot offer. I did that once and it was the worst hire I ever made. Without going into detail, I'll just say that before we fired her we ended up with the police in the office.

                At my current employer, the GM (against my advice) made an on-the-spot offer and I am currently, less than three months later, writing up a formal report on appropriate procedures to terminate her.

                Give it some thought before you make up your mind.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Also ask what they know about your company.

                  It amazes me when I have interviewed people about a position and they ask what we do or make or sell.

                  Research shows commitment, thought and preparedness. I like those.

                  is preparedness a word?
                  Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

                  I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

                  Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the input!

                    CBG and Jeff- All of the interviews I do come after a phone prescreen, another screening when they come into my office, and then I look over their application and then do the interview.


                    I always ask them what they know about our company and how they heard about the position when they walk into our office.

                    Once again, Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Even so, I still would recommend not making on-the-spot offers. You're in the most employee-friendly state in the US; it can't hurt to review before you make an offer.
                      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RissaART View Post
                        Thanks! Im making a list
                        Do that.

                        Then use a more or less standardized list of questions based upon it (helps to avoid claims of discrimination).

                        Feel free to wander away from the standard list when you get an odd answer that needs to be clarified.

                        My quick review of this thread shows that Betty3 has some good comments.

                        Hiring security guards, the first question we ask is "Why are you interested in working in security?" We do not ask that question of someone that has previously worked in security.

                        There are two wrong answers.

                        "I need a job" = "I will stay with you until I can get the pay and benefits I was used to making"

                        "I always wanted to work in security" = "I will stay with you until I can find a job that is not at night and on weekends and/or pays a penny more an hour."

                        Have fun.

                        Seriously, your question is good and you need to have behaviorally oriented interview questions to weed out folks.

                        You mentioned telephone screens -- what are they asked during those? Could some that get by that gate be eliminated earlier?
                        Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Oh, you will not forget the questions to ask if you have them written down.
                          Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

                          Comment

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