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  • Work Experience


    Help!



    I have just printed out the skills assessment form and noticed that you
    have to state ALL jobs since leaving school! My partner has had about 20
    jobs most of which are nothing to do with his nomiated occupation! He
    has had a far more steady working histroy in the past 6 years since he
    has discovered what he is good at doing (all the past 6 years has been
    experience in his nominated occupation). The biggest problem is that he
    can't remember where he worked when and he didn't keep ANY records! Does
    anyone think we are going to have enough problems that we should look at
    using an agent? He has no formal qualifications as such (just some
    diplomas from institutes which I think would be the equivalent of going
    on a computer course or something). However he is extremely well
    respected and known throughout his field as being one of the best which
    I would think would count for something! Can you attach additional
    paperwork such as letters from customers etc even if he has not been
    self employed?



    Sorry so many questions but I am trying to get my head round all of this
    (would love to get an agent but don't think I can afford it right now!)


    --
    Posted via http://britishexpats.com

  • #2
    Work Experience


    Work experience is very important for skill assessment. Please
    get an agent.


    --
    Posted via http://britishexpats.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Work Experience

      Work experience is very important for DIMIA unless you're an eligible
      recent Aus graduate.

      For skill assessment, the importance of work experience varies
      greatly. For some assessing bodies (eg ACS, TRA) it's very important,
      while others like Vetassess don't look at it at all.

      Hiring an agent is often a good idea.

      Jeremy
      On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 12:36:11 +0000, goodie <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote:Work experience is very important for skill assessment. Pleaseget an agent.--Posted via http://britishexpats.com
      This is not intended to be legal advice in any jurisdiction

      Comment


      • #4
        Work Experience


        Thanks for your help everyone. Spoke to an agent last night and
        discovered some bad news! As my boyfriend has not been formally trained
        he has to work 6 years to be considered qualified so he needs 3 years
        experience after that. We can get away with saying that he has worked in
        the industry for about 7 or 8 years so we are in a bit of trouble. Can't
        afford the bond so not sure what to do!


        --
        Posted via http://britishexpats.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Work Experience


          Originally posted by Jaj
          Work experience is very important for DIMIA unless you're an eligible recent Aus graduate.


          Jeremy,



          Speaking of visa applications by recent Australian graduates (but
          unrelated to work experience)...



          Until very recently, my opinion has been that a recent Australian
          graduate should be able to apply for the onshore overseas student
          skilled visa pretty much on their own, if they are eligible.



          However, I've met a couple of cases where they have managed to
          complicate their situations enough that I've changed my mind somewhat.



          In one case I know of, the person is now on a visitor visa, with no
          working rights, when she should have applied for the 497. With the
          visitor visa, she obviously has no working rights etc and can only sit
          and wait until her skilled visa application is approved, if at all.



          Peter


          --
          This post is an expression of opinion and is neither legal nor immigration advice.


          Posted via http://britishexpats.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Work Experience


            Peter,



            I agree - onshore student applications can be very tricky.



            Besides the obvious issues in ensuring that the application is valid:

            - there are transitional arrangements, which means that the criteria are
            different for students who were studying in Australia before 1 April
            2003. There are some problems with the way that the legislation has
            been worded, which mean that extra care needs to be taken

            - there are issues with compliance with student visa conditions if the
            student visa is not due to expire for some time. I have had some
            students requested to answer notices of intention to cancel even if
            they have lodged their 497/880 application

            - there are issues with bridging visas and lawful status whilst awaiting
            a decision from ASPC

            - there are issues with including family members in the application



            A lot of students ask advice from students who have gone throught
            the process the previous semester or previous year. Unfortunately,
            this can lead to serious problems, because the legislation is
            changing all the time.



            Rgds,


            --
            Posted via http://britishexpats.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Work Experience

              Had exactly the same.
              My hubby is a chef and has worked all over the world - many hotels /
              restaurants etc plus been self employed.It was a complete nightmare getting
              everything together. In the end we went to an agent ( 4 corners) they were
              very good and advised us all the way. The solution was for Steve to do a
              statutory declaration - witnessed by a solicitor. In this he detailed all
              his work experience and how he actually did the job - as far as including
              recipes just to prove that he knew what a chef did. Photos of him in chefs
              whites. Letters from suppliers when he was self employed - copies of
              accounts - business cards from his resturant - timeline back 20 years with
              detail for 12 yrs.
              Hope its worth it.


              TRA was posted in August - awaiting response - will let you know
              "nikkikirby" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message
              news:[email protected]
              Help! I have just printed out the skills assessment form and noticed that you have to state ALL jobs since leaving school! My partner has had about 20 jobs most of which are nothing to do with his nomiated occupation! He has had a far more steady working histroy in the past 6 years since he has discovered what he is good at doing (all the past 6 years has been experience in his nominated occupation). The biggest problem is that he can't remember where he worked when and he didn't keep ANY records! Does anyone think we are going to have enough problems that we should look at using an agent? He has no formal qualifications as such (just some diplomas from institutes which I think would be the equivalent of going on a computer course or something). However he is extremely well respected and known throughout his field as being one of the best which I would think would count for something! Can you attach additional paperwork such as letters from customers etc even if he has not been self employed? Sorry so many questions but I am trying to get my head round all of this (would love to get an agent but don't think I can afford it right now!) -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com

              Comment

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