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Governor Davis Not Protecting Civil Rights

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  • Governor Davis Not Protecting Civil Rights

    Hello all:

    Hopefully I manage it correctly as I'm sending this to five newsgroups (NG)
    and a mailing list through Yahoo as well as to a friend. I don't want to
    misuse my computer right now as it's one of the only resources I have, and
    things are not fair for either me or my dad. Moreover, John Rawls came up
    today in a conversation with someone where I live, a San Jose State graduate
    already, and John Rawls talks about social justice in his piece _A Theory of
    Justice_ (1971), a chapter of which I read in the anthology _American
    Political Thought_ (Davis, 1996). Rawls's introduction goes into "The Role
    of Justice" as chapter 1, which the reading includes.

    Anyway, Governor Davis's signing of a domestic partner bill contradicts
    civil rights. I have decided to vote for his recall when given the
    opportunity. Moreover, hopefully California's governor or new governor, if
    we get one, will work for justice.

    Rawls distinguishes between ideal and partial justice theories in his piece.
    Just war theory, he claims, falls within a partial justice rather than ideal
    justice framework. On the other hand, he does not think that "the loss of
    freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others." "Each
    person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare
    of society as a whole cannot override... [Justice] does not allow that the
    sacrifices imposed on a few are outweighed by the larger sum of advantages
    enjoyed by many." As an apparent liberal thinker he goes on to say

    Therefore in a just society the liberties of equal citizenship are
    taken as settled;
    the rights secured by justice are not subject to political
    bargaining or to the calculus
    of social interests. The only thing that permits us to acquiesce
    in an erroneous
    theory is the lack of a better one; analogously, an injustice is
    tolerable only when it
    is necessary to avoid an even greater injustice...

    I had trouble sharing ideas with the roommate this morning. He had read
    Rawls as well for a business class, and he talked about Rawls's "original
    position" and how in it, "inequalities of wealth and authority, are just
    only if they result in compensating benefits for everyone," and has my
    roommate explained but I couldn't, how "the persons in the initial
    situation," who are ignorant of their social position, "would chose two
    rather different principles: the first requires equality in the assignment
    of basic rights and duties, while the second holds that social and economic
    inequalities, for example inequalities of wealth and authority, are just
    only if they result in compensating benefits for everyone, and in particular
    for the least advantaged members of society." In other words, "since
    everyone's well-being depends upon a scheme of cooperation without which no
    one could have a satisfactory life, the division of advantages should," in
    this "original position," "be such to draw forth the willing cooperation of
    everyone taking part in it, including those less well situated..."

    I had wanted to cite another American political thinker, probably the
    fitting Martin Luther King Jr., as I believe I have civil-rights matters not
    correctly addressed, including in the signing of this current
    domestic-partner bill by Governor Davis. I have been complaining at the
    federal level since 1992, and a gay-Episcopal priest does not even fall in a
    satisfactory range of support at the moment, basically putting a bit of the
    old wool over my eyes (LOL)... However, Rawls's "social justice"and
    "justice" hold relevance because "... principles of justice deal with
    conflicting claims upon the advantages won by social cooperation..." Rawls
    also says that his "original position" assumes "the parties do not know
    their conceptions of the good or their special psychological
    propensities..." He also argues his original position involves "ideal
    justice theory" or "strict compliance" "as opposed to partial compliance
    theory..." Partial compliance "studies the principles that govern how we
    are to deal with injustice. It comprises such topics as the theory of
    punishment, the doctrine of just war, and the justification of various ways
    of opposing unjust regimes ranging from civil disobedience and militant
    resistance to revolution and rebellion." However, Rawls claims his "ideal
    justice" and "strict compliance" theory are more reasonable than "partial
    compliance theory," I believe.

    Thanks,

    Vincent H. Bartning
    SJSU Senior, Incorporator, USA KIA/DOW Family Foundation

    Check Out the USA KIA/DOW Family Foundation @
    http://usakiadowff.org

    Check out the USA KIA/DOW Discussion Group @
    http://groups.aol.com/usakiadowfamily



  • #2
    Governor Davis Not Protecting Civil Rights

    "Vincent Henry Bartning" <[email protected]> writes:
    Hello all: <snip> Rawls's introduction goes into "The Role of Justice" as chapter 1, which the reading includes. Anyway, Governor Davis's signing of a domestic partner bill contradicts civil rights. I have decided to vote for his recall when given the opportunity. Moreover, hopefully California's governor or new governor, if we get one, will work for justice. Rawls distinguishes between ideal and partial justice theories in his piece. Just war theory, he claims, falls within a partial justice rather than ideal justice framework. On the other hand, he does not think that "the loss of freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others." <snip> Thanks, Vincent H. Bartning SJSU Senior, Incorporator, USA KIA/DOW Family Foundation
    I take it that you will not be going to graduate school. :-)

    If you saw the SF Chronicle this morning, there was a discussion of
    the bill Davis signed along with articles about the recall-election.
    Apparently, if you wanted to, you could arrange for everything the
    domestic partnership bill provides on your own, but to do that, you'd
    have to draw up a number of legal documents at considerable expense as
    your lawyer researches it and covers all the bases. It cited a couple
    that had set up such a contract, and the legal fees were significant.

    All the bill does is to make this sort of arrangement available at low
    cost. Whether you like the bill or not, the bill does not "contradict
    civil rights" as you claim. It just saves people the expense of
    hiring a lawyer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Governor Davis Not Protecting Civil Rights

      "Vincent Henry Bartning" <[email protected]> wrote in message
      news[email protected]
      Hello all: Hopefully I manage it correctly as I'm sending this to five newsgroups
      (NG)
      and a mailing list through Yahoo as well as to a friend.
      Too bad you can't send an answer to my question as easily.
      I don't want to misuse my computer right now
      Then don't post. You have one of the lowest signal-to-noise ratios on
      Usenet.
      --
      If you have had problems with Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC),
      please contact shredder at bellsouth dot net. There may be a class-action
      lawsuit
      in the works.


      Comment

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