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Change from FT to PRN after FMLA? Florida

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  • Change from FT to PRN after FMLA? Florida

    I have been on FMLA for 23 days after surgery. I found a new job and would like to continue working for my current employer as PRN. Do I have to give notice? if so how much time in advance?

  • #2
    Unless you have a contract requiring a certain amount of notice, it's not required and is generally considered a courtesy. However, if you want to continue working for your present employer on an on-call basis, I'd suggest that you provide that courtesy. Two weeks is standard, although there's no law that would require them to grant your request for PRN status.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

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    • #3
      I can't tell if you want to leave this employer for another job but still work for them on a different basis than you are now or if you are asking for a re-assignment to a different job but at the same employer as soon as you are able to return. How would a transfer work from your current position to the PRN position if you were not on FMLA? Would you have to give notice and then re-apply? FMLA doesn't guarantee you a transfer to another position nor does it guarantee you a "rehire-able" status when you are able to return unless you return to the same position within the 12 weeks.

      Have you spoken to HR about your request? Or looked into their policies for transferring positions? Or their policies on going from FT to a PT position while working for another employer? A lot is going to be dependent on their policies. I would try to get their policies in writing, but do realize by doing so that you are showing them your hand of cards.

      If you are able to work and do not return after FMLA to the same position, it is possible that the employer could choose to invoke their right to recover some of their benefit costs. The standard is that the employee must return to work for at least 30 days. It sounds like these are circumstances that are under your control and your health condition will not prevent you from continuing to work. It doesn't mean they will invoke that right, but they can. To be sure you are covered under this, I would give at least 30 days notice. And when you throw in the part about wanting to continue to work for them as a PRN, I can't really tell you if that would be considered "Failure to return to work". So 30 days staying in the FT position is your best bet.

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      • #4
        We don't have a lot of detail here as to exactly what you want to do. However, I agree that you might want to stay in your full time position for 30 days so as not to have to possibly pay back any of your benefit costs employer paid while you were out.
        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bottom line is, the more notice you give, the more likely your employer will call you for on-call work.

          Comment


          • #6
            That's true - more likely than not. Two weeks is generally standard notice. It isn't completely clear just what OP wants to do.
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

            Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Betty3 View Post
              It isn't completely clear just what OP wants to do.
              Walk off the job without giving notice and then legally bind this employer to put her on the on-call list?

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              • #8
                It does seem "maybe so" but we told her best to give notice & to work full time for 30 days so she doesn't have to possibly pay back any benefits paid for by employer.

                I guess OP will do as she wants/decides. (though it seems OP will need to talk to employer/HR re doing any work for them if she works another job also)
                Last edited by Betty3; 03-03-2015, 08:42 AM.
                Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                Comment

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