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Pregnancy noted California

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  • Pregnancy noted California

    We have an employee who is pregnant. Can we require her to bring a note stating any restrictions she may or may not have?
    Last edited by FSUMay08; 05-30-2012, 03:34 PM.

  • #2
    I don't know what type of work she does (her duties) but is there any reason to suspect that she may not be able to do her job because of her pregnancy? Do you have some type of concern regarding her job & her pregnancy?

    Has she asked for any restrictions/accommodations herself due to her pregnancy?
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      She has not asked for any restrictions. Most of her job is at a desk answering calls. For about 20 minutes a day she is on our warehouse checking in product which may require some lifting of about 20 pounds, but she has a second person who is there with her that can assist.

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      • #4
        Then I wouldn't ask her for anything.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          As long as she can do her job/is doing her job, I wouldn't ask for a doctor's note just because she is pregnant. The employer I worked for certainly wouldn't.

          You can hold for possible other opinions.

          PS - I might add you have to be careful of pregnancy discrimination (though I don't know how many employees you have) - you're not really justified in asking for a doctor's note just because she is pregnant.

          cbg, your reply wasn't there when I started mine.
          Last edited by Betty3; 05-31-2012, 07:36 AM. Reason: add PS
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment


          • #6
            Agreed with the other answers. If you have one set of rules that apply to pregnant employees and a different set of rules for everyone, you are in deep legal do-do. Wait for the employee to request an accommodations, then and only then, legally react to the request. Also, beside establishing a different set of rules for pregnant employees, your question implies that you are trying to lock down the accommodations (if any) to those needed earlier in the pregnancy and if the condition changes, you want to use this as an exacuse to deny further accommodations. If so, that is a very dangerous path to take.
            "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
            Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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            • #7
              The bottom line is: Treat your pregnant employees no differently than you would any other employees.
              Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

              Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

              Comment

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