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Thread: Reporting Pay/Min Hours Worked

  1. #1
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    Question Reporting Pay/Min Hours Worked

    I apologize that this is not by an individual state. I just need to know which states require a reporting time/show up pay premium? Which states have a minimum number of hours in which an employee can work? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Default

    I'm not aware of any place where this information is compiled by state. I think that you'd need to visit each state's website and search for regulations related to minimum hours required to be paid.

    The following link lists each state's website which may make the process a little easier.
    http://www.dol.gov/esa/contacts/state_of.htm#AL

  3. #3
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    Default State by State Comparison

    This is a better link for a state by state comparison of wage requirements. http://www.dol.gov/esa/programs/whd/state/state.htm

    Let me know if you have any other questions.

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    Smile Thanks

    Thank you for your help. In case anyone else is looking for this information, I found it on a BNA Chart that was emailed to be through the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) online help. Sorry that I don't have access to a website to post for you to use. Thanks again!

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    Question Chere's that chart?

    Quote Originally Posted by LLayman
    Thank you for your help. In case anyone else is looking for this information, I found it on a BNA Chart that was emailed to be through the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) online help. Sorry that I don't have access to a website to post for you to use. Thanks again!
    Where can I get that information? Can I get a copy of that chart or can you direct me to a source for it? It woudl save a ton of time. Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Default Chart -

    State Wage Payment Laws — Comparison Chart (BNA chart)
     Employers Covered identifies the kinds of organizations subject to the state's wage-payment laws.
     Call-In, Waiting, Working Time outlines pay requirements imposed when employees are called in to work outside their regular hours or must spend time waiting or engaged in other nonproductive activities.

    STATE REQUIREMENTS AND PROVISIONS
    Alabama Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Alaska Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Arizona Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Arkansas Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    California Employers Covered — All employers, except counties, quasi-municipal corporations, and school districts and students of nonprofit educational institutions.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Call-In, Waiting Time Employees who report for work when required but are furnished less than one half of a scheduled or usual day's work shall be paid for half a scheduled or usual day's work, but in no event less than two hours or more than four hours at the regular rate of pay. Employees (except in household occupations) who report a second time for work when required in any one day and are furnished less than two hours of work on the second reporting shall be paid for two hours at the regular rate of pay. Provisions are inapplicable when: operations cannot commence or continue due to threats to employees or property, or when recommended by civil authorities; public utilities fail to provide the elements necessary to commence or continue operations, or the interruption of work is caused by an Act of God or other cause not within employer's control. These pay requirements also are inapplicable to employee on stand-by pay status who is called to perform assigned work outside of scheduled reporting time. Split Shifts: One hour's pay at minimum wage shall be paid in addition to minimum wage for that workday, except when the employee resides at place of employment. Motion Picture Industry: Extras not notified at time of call of a requirement to do night, wet, or dangerous work may refuse work and shall be paid for all time consumed. Extras must be compensated for damage to personal property if damaged through nature of work. Extras required to report for custom fittings shall be paid a full day's agreed wage if they are not given the employment for which the costume was fitted. Extras shall be paid applicable minimum wage for interview or audition time that lasts longer than one and one-half hours.
    Colorado Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Connecticut Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Call-In, Waiting Time: Hours worked shall include all time during which employee is required to be on premises or on duty. Mealtime is not included unless employee is required or permitted to work. When employee is subject to call for emergency service, working time shall begin when employee is notified of assignment and shall end when assignment is completed. Additionally, wage orders covering specific industries include the following provisions:
    • Beauty Shops — All time must be reckoned to nearest unit of 15 minutes. Working time includes time during which employee is required to be on duty or at the prescribed premises, whether or not work is then provided by employer; time employee is permitted to work though not required to do so; and time employee is required to travel to place other than regular place of employment. Employee who reports, by request or permission of employer, for duty on any day whether or not assigned to actual work shall be paid for minimum of four hours at regular rate.
    • Laundry Industry — Employees called for work must receive minimum four hours' pay at minimum or regular rate, whichever is higher, even if no work is provided. If regular working day on Saturday is less than four hours, such employees must be paid for minimum three hours, including employees called in.
    • Cleaning and Dyeing Industry — All time must be reckoned to nearest unit of 15 minutes. Waiting and travel time must be paid for at least four hours except where work is suspended due to breakdown or Act of God. Where guarantee of minimum daily earnings is to be waived because employee is unable or unwilling to work four hours, written statement to this effect must be signed by employee and kept on file as part of records.
    • Mercantile Industry — All time must be reckoned to nearest unit of 15 minutes. Working time includes all time during which employee is required to be on duty or at prescribed premises, whether or not work is provided and during which employee is permitted to work though not required to do so. Employee, who by request or permission of employer, reports to work whether or not assigned to actual work must be paid for minimum four hours' work. In instances of regularly scheduled employment of less than four hours, as mutually agreed in writing between employer and employee and approved by state department of labor, this provision may be waived provided minimum daily pay in every instance is at least twice the applicable minimum hourly rate.
    • Restaurant and Hotel Industry — All time must be reckoned to nearest unit of 15 minutes. Employee regularly reporting for work (unless given adequate notice on preceding day)or any employee called for work in any day shall be assured minimum of two hours' earnings at minimum rate if employee is able and willing to work that length of time. If employee is either unwilling or unable to work the number of hours necessary to ensure two-hour guarantee, statement signed by employee attesting to this situation must be kept on file as part of employer's records. Employee who is required or permitted to travel from one establishment to another after beginning or before close of workday shall be compensated for travel time at same rate as for working time, and shall be reimbursed for transportation.
    Delaware Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    District of Columbia Employers Covered — All employers, except the U.S. and D.C. governments, and employers subject to Railway Labor Act. Also not applicable to persons in bona fide executive, administrative, or professional capacity, as defined.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Employers must pay employees for at least four hours each day on which the employee reports for work under general or specific instructions but is given less than four hours of work, except that if the employee is regularly scheduled for less than four hours a day, such employee shall be paid for the hours regularly scheduled. Includes all time during which employee is required to be on employer's premises or be on duty or to be at prescribed place; permitted to work; or required to travel in connection with employer's business. Split Shifts: Employees shall be paid one additional hour at minimum wage rate in addition to regular pay for each day split shift is worked.
    Florida Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Georgia Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Hawaii Employers Covered — All employers, except the federal and state governments and political subdivisions.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Split Shifts: No employer shall employ any employee in split shifts unless all of said shifts within a period of 24 hours shall fall within a period of 14 consecutive hours, except in case of extraordinary emergency.
    Idaho Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Illinois Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Indiana Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Iowa Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Kansas Employers Covered — Employers include any individual, partnership, association, joint stock company, trust, corporation, limited liability company or other organization, the administrator or executor of the estate of a deceased individual, or other receiver, trustee, or successor of any of the same, the state or any department, agency, or authority of the state, any city, county, school district or other political subdivision, municipality or public corporation, and any instrumentality thereof, employing any person.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Working time includes any period of time during which the employee is performing services for an employer or is required to wait or remain on call by the employer. The term includes: time employee on call is required to remain at a specific place to await possible call to perform a work assignment for the employer and is prevented from using the time for his or her own personal benefit; time spent by employee who is required to report at a specific time but must wait for an assignment; sleeping period of not more than eight hours occurring during a work period of 24 hours or more when the employee is not permitted at least five hours of continuous sleep; time of less than 30 minutes between the required reporting time and the end of the required hours of work;time when an employer or anyone having management responsibilities has made any actual inferred or implied requirement that work be performed; time spent in walking, riding, or traveling to and from the actual place the employee is required to report when the period of time is compensable by express contract, custom, or practice; time spent in training, lectures, or meetings that occur during the employee's regular working hours when the subject matter is directly related to the employee's job and nonattendance would have an adverse effect on the employment relationship. Compensable working time excludes the followingeriods of time when the employer has required employees to leave word at their home or with company official where they can be reached; any period of 30 minutes or more that employees previously have been advised will be treated as a nonpaid period and no services are required — e.g., lunch periods, time between split shifts, and periods of time when employees are waiting due to delay and are free to use the time for their own use; time spent at voluntary lectures, training, or meetings that are outside required working hours and are not directly related to the employee's work assignment;and time spent by employees at the worksite pursuing their own private interests.
    Kentucky Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Louisiana Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Maine Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Maryland Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Massachusetts Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Employees in funeral homes, doctors' offices, and similar places of business, who are on duty or on call to attend emergencies, or who are on call during the night and who are provided sleeping quarters, must be paid the minimum rate for at least four hours. Commissioner may permit employment for less than four hours. Employee who reports for work by request or permission of employer must be paid for three hours of work whether or not furnished. Commissioner may permit employment for less than three hours. An employee required to be on duty at the worksite for less than 24 hours is working even if the employee is permitted to sleep or engage in other personal activities when not busy. Where an employee is required to be on duty at the worksite for 24 hours or more, the employer and employee may agree to exclude meal periods and sleeping periods of not more than 8 hours from working time, provided the employer provides adequate sleeping quarters. If no prior agreement is made, sleeping time and meal time will constitute working time. If the sleeping period is interrupted by a call to duty, all such time on duty must be counted as working time. If the sleeping period is interrupted to such an extent that the employee cannot get a reasonable night's sleep, the entire period must be counted as working time. Three-hour clause inapplicable to charitable organizations;hospitals, nursing homes, and similar establishments; schools, universities, and colleges; or summer camps.
    Michigan Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Minnesota Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Includes training, call-in, cleaning or waiting time, or any other time when employee must be either on employer's premises or involved in the performance of work-related duties.
    Mississippi Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Missouri Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Montana Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Nebraska Employers Covered — All employers, except the state.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Time spent by employees appearing in court as a function of their job shall be considered hours worked. All witness fees and reimbursements received as a result of these court appearances shall be returned to the state.
    Nevada Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    New Hampshire Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — On the day employee reports to work at employer's request, employee shall be paid not less than two hours' pay at regular rate. No employer who makes a good faith effort to notify employee not to report to work shall be liable to pay wages. If employee reports to work after employer's attempt to notify employee has been unsuccessful or if employer is prevented from making notification for any reason, employee shall perform whatever duties are assigned by employer at time employee reports to work.
    New Jersey Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — All the time the employee is required to be on duty shall be counted as hours worked. However, if on-call employees are not required to remain on the premises and are free to follow their own pursuits, subject only to the requirement of leaving word where they may be reached, only the time actually spent in making a call is counted as hours worked. Employee who resides on employer's premises and whose hours are irregular and intermittent shall be paid for not less than eight hours for each day on duty. Beauty Culture and Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries: time during which employee is required to wait on premises and during which period no work is provided by employer shall be counted as working time and be paid at regular rate. Mercantile Occupations:Working time includes time worked and time of authorized attendance, whether or not work is provided, and time spent traveling, within state, from one establishment to another, where such travel time is authorized or requested by employer. Waiting time must be counted as working time and paid at regular rate.
    New Mexico Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    New York Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Wage orders covering various industries include the following provisions:
    • Restaurant Industry — Employee who by request or permission of employer reports for duty on any day, whether or not assigned to actual work, shall be paid at applicable minimum wage rate for at least three hours for one shift, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less; for at least six hours for two shifts totaling six hours or less, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less; and for at least eight hours for three shifts totaling eight hours or less, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less. For split shifts, additional hour's pay at full-time rate before allowances, in addition to required minimum wages, on each day in which spread of hours exceeds 10.
    • Hotel Industry — All-year Hotels — Working time means actual service or time of permitted attendance at establishment and time spent in traveling at request of employer. Waiting time, other than time off duty for split shift, during which employee is required or permitted to wait while no work is provided must be counted as working time and paid for at not less than applicable minimum hourly rate before taking into account any allowance for tips, but after taking into account any allowances for meals and total number of hours of working time for that week. Resort Hotels — Working time means time employee is permitted to work, or is required to be available for work at place prescribed by employer and includes time spent travelling where such travelling is part of employee's duties. All Hotels — Residential employees are not deemed to be permitted to work or required to be available for work during their normal sleeping hours, even if they are required to be on call during such hours, or at any other time when they are free to leave place of employment. Call-In Pay — Nonresidential employee who by request or permission of employer reports for duty, whether or not assigned work, shall be paid for at least three hours for one shift, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less; for at least six hours for two shifts totaling six hours or less, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less; for at least eight hours for three shifts totaling eight hours or less, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less. Payment shall be at applicable minimum wage rate after allowance for tips for time actually worked and without allowance for tips for balance of period. Split Shifts — One hour's pay in addition to hourly wage earned to nonresidential employees in all-year hotels on any day when spread of hours exceeds 10.
    • Miscellaneous Industries and Occupations — Employee who by request or permission of employer reports for work on any day shall be paid for at least four hours, or number of hours in regularly scheduled shift, whichever is less, at basic minimum hourly wage. Employees on split shifts must be paid one hour's pay at basic minimum hourly wage rate, in addition to minimum wage, on any day in which spread of hours exceeds 10 hours, or there is split shift, or both situations occur.
    • Farm Workers — Working time is hours that employee is permitted to work or is required to be available for work at assigned place, including time spent in going from one field to another, in waiting for baskets, on pick-up activities, or when machinery or equipment breaks down and employees are required to remain at site during repairs. Time not worked because of weather conditions shall not be considered hours worked. Employee living on premises of employer shall not be considered to have worked or to have been available for work during normal sleeping hours solely because employee is required to be on call during such hours, or at any other time when employee is free to leave place of employment.
    North Carolina Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    North Dakota Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — The following times are compensable at regular rate of pay: mandatory meetings and training; standby time on premises, or “on cal and therefore unable to carry out day-to-day activities otherwise available; and travel from jobsite to jobsite.
    Ohio Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Oklahoma Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Oregon Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Pennsylvania Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Hours worked includes time when an employee is required by the employer to be on the premises of the employer, to be on duty, or to be at the prescribed work place; time spent in traveling as part of the duties of an employee during normal working hours and time during which an employee is employed or permitted to work; provided, however, that time allowed for meals shall be excluded unless the employee is required or permitted to work during that time, and provided further, that time spent on the premises of the employer for the convenience of the employee shall be excluded.
    Puerto Rico Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Call In, Waiting: For Construction, Quarrying, Ice Cream, Lumber and Wood Products; Metal Furniture, Doors and Windows; Straw, Hair, and Related Products; Laundry and Dry Cleaning; Transportation; General Agricultural Activities; and Stone, Clay, Glass, Cement, and Related Products Industries, employers must pay minimum of four hours' pay if employee reports to work and less than four hours' work is given, unless employer notifies employee before end of previous work shift not to report except for cases of Acts of God. Exception also exists for machinery breakdown in ice cream and lumber industries. In Printing, Publishing, and other Graphic Arts Industry, employers must pay employees for minimum of five hours work under similar circumstances. In Theater and Cinema Industry, employer must pay employees who work for more than one performance for at least five hours' work and employees who work for one performance for at least three hours' work, except for failures to provide work due to Acts of God. For Sugar Industry in its Agricultural Phase, employer shall provide workers with at least 4 hours' work in every 24-hour period except in such situations involving machinery or equipment breakage, stoppage at mill, strikes, or Act of God. For the Hotel Industry, “paradores”and enterprises with volume of annual gross income of less than $362,500 must pay employees working more than 24 hours per week but less than 32 hours per week for 32 hours per week at regular rate except in cases of Acts of God. For all remaining hotel enterprises and for the Beer Industry, employers must pay employees working more than 20 hours but less than 32 hours per week for 32 hours' work at regular rate and pay employees working 20 hours or less a week at one and one-half times the regular hourly rate, except for Acts of God. For Hospital, Clinic and Sanatorium Industry, employers must pay employees who work more than 32 hours but less than 40 hours per week for 40 hours' work at regular rate, except in cases of Acts of God.
    Rhode Island Employers Covered — All employers, except state and local governments, and religious, literary, and charitable corporations.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Call In Time: Employer who requests or permits employee to report for work at beginning of work shift and does not furnish at least three hours'work on that shift must pay such employee not less than three times the regular hourly rate. When employee reports for duty at beginning of work shift and employer offers no work for employee, such employee shall be paid not less than three times the hourly rate. Waiting Time: In the Laundry and Dry Cleaning Industry, time during which employees are required to wait on employer's premises and no work is provided shall be counted as working time and paid for at the regular rate. Time worked shall be reckoned to the nearest unit of 15 minutes. In the Retail Trade, waiting time on the employer's premises when no work is provided shall be counted as working time and paid for at applicable minimum hourly rate. In the Restaurant, Hotel Restaurant, and Public Housekeeping Industries, on days when restaurants and hotel restaurants have a spread of hours exceeding 10, or in which there is more than one interval off duty (excluding any meal period of one hour or less), employees (except in resort hotels) shall receive $0.50 in addition to hourly wages earned that day. Employees in resort hotels, working in covered occupation, shall receive $0.50 in addition to hourly wages earned in day which spread of hours exceeds 12 or in which there are more than two intervals off duty(excluding any meal period of one hour or less). For public housekeeping occupations, on day which spread of hours exceeds 10 (12 for employees in seasonal resorts) or in which there is more than one interval off duty (excluding meal period of one hour or less), employee shall receive $0.75 in addition to hourly wages earned that day. Waiting time, other than time off for split shift, shall be counted as working time and paid for at applicable hourly rate.
    South Carolina Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    South Dakota Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Tennessee Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Texas Employers Covered — All employers except the federal government and the state of Texas and its political subdivisions.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Resident on-call employees are to be paid only for hours actually worked.
    Utah Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Vermont Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Virginia Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Washington Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    West Virginia Employers Covered — All employers.
    Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — Working time includes all time employee is required to be on employer's premises or at prescribed workplace. Includes: on-call time on employer's premises, nearby, or at home if employees cannot use time effectively for their own purposes, as distinguished from time when workers are required merely to leave word at home or with employer where they may be reached;all time spent in mental or physical exertion under employer's control; general work not requested but allowed; clothes-changing and washing when indispensable to employee's work (but not before or after end of workday), or required by laws, rules, or regulations or constituting preliminary or postliminary activities by contract or custom; general waiting time when employee is engaged to wait; rest periods from five to 20 minutes. Excludes: travel time spent to and from work.
    Wisconsin Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.
    Wyoming Call-In, Waiting, Working Time — No pay provision.

  7. #7
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    Default minimum required hours

    I was wondering if anyone can tell me if there is a NYS minimum for hours required for part time employees. So far I have only come across an obvious full time standard....here's to hoping!

  8. #8
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    In all 50 states, what is considered part time and what is considered full time employment is the decision of the employer. Neither is mandated by law.

  9. #9
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    Default figures...

    Thanks, the company that i work for is having me cut the hours of my part time employees, and i've been having a lot of complaints....I just wanted to make sure everything was legit though...I still feel bad, i was just hoping there was something in the law that required me to do more for them

  10. #10
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    No, not based on what little you've posted

  11. #11
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    Default more info..

    I am a manager for a retail company. The store that i run with my co-manager is alloted a certain amount of hours for each week. Normally there are just enough hours for my staff. However, they just cut our alloted amount of hours. I am required to schedule my full time employees 37 and 1/2 hours due to company policy, but that doesn't leave me with any for my part timers. I don't have any hours for them....I feel bad, and i was hoping that there would be some kind of legal issue with that so that i could get the hours I needed. There is nothing in the companies policy manual that guarantees part timers hours...

  12. #12
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    If the hours aren't available, they're not available.

  13. #13
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    Nope, sorry, there's nothing you can do. No laws are being broken.

  14. #14
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    In MA, you can't force an employer to provide hours so work can be completed. In fact, there was a DOS opinion letter on that issue in 2001, dealing with an employee who was working past 5pm to complete his work, even though the employer told him to stop working. There, the DOS ruled that the work was not authorized and therefore "not performed in the 'service' of the employer..."

    But, I also wanted to take this opportunity to supplement an earlier response in this chain.

    BE CAREFUL in MA, because the Minimum Wage Regulations were amended in 2003. The definition of “on-call” is now very fact specific, although at least it now has some guidance.

    The MA Minimum Wage Regulations, at 455 CMR 2.03(2) have defined “On-Call Time” as follows: “An on-call employee who is not required to be at the work site and who is effectively free to use his or her time for his or her own purposes, is not working while on call.” The DOS issued an opinion letter in 2002 discussing “on-call” time, which said basically that if the on-call employee is free to use his or her time for his or her own purposes, then the on-call time is not compensable, but each situation is fact-specific. They look at restrictions on movement, frequency of calls, required response time, actual use of on-call time for personal purposes, whether calls can be refused, and if disciplinary action is taken for lack of response. The April 2003 regs codify this position.

    455 CMR 2.03(1), also amended in 2003, deals with “show-up” pay, or reporting pay. It states very that if an employee is “scheduled to work 3 or more hours” and reports for duty, then he gets paid for at least 3 hours.

    Of course, there's quite a bit more on each of these questions, but the answers depend upon your situation. We deal with meal breaks, preliminary/postliminary work, travel time (in-state, out-of-stae, social events, commuting time, split shifts, sleep time, etc.), leave time, etc.


    .
    Last edited by CompensationCounsel; 01-02-2006 at 06:45 AM.
    This post is by Philip Gordon, a Massachusetts employment attorney (www.gordonllp.com).

    This post is NOT legal advice. It is for general/educational information purposes only. You should not rely on this post if you are making decisions, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. This post may be considered "advertising" under the MA professional rules for attorneys.

  15. #15

    Default

    I live in California and I was wondering if it was OK for an employer to schedule you a small amount of hours per week, say 4 hours, if you're part-time. And are they allowed to just not put you on the schedule at all for any length of time. Thanks. It seems you may have already answered my question above but I just wanted to make sure. It seems weird that you could get hired and then just never be put on the schedule and still be "employed" by a company.
    Last edited by dancingmelissa; 01-06-2006 at 04:23 PM.

  16. #16
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    Yes, that is legal. Or more correctly, there is no law prohibiting it.

  17. #17

    Default

    Thanks for your help.
    Melissa

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    Default VCS: pay stubs not being released by employer

    Hi, I will need some suggestion...i am on H1 B visa from last 4 months and employed through Vergina consultant in IL from last two months. I have been paid for the last month but my consulatnt is not ready to give me pay stub probably he is thinking that I may look for H1 B transfer..... I have requested several time and still have not recevied the pay stub....based on my discussion i get sense that he is not willing to give my pay stub...

    Q : what would be the recomanded course of action...?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbg View Post
    In all 50 states, what is considered part time and what is considered full time employment is the decision of the employer. Neither is mandated by law.
    Actually, in California 40 hours per week is considered full time per the labor code.

  20. #20
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    Default

    You may not have noticed that this thread was from over a year ago. I have since learned that not only CA but CO also has legislation in this matter.

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    By MaryCollins in forum Wage & Hour Laws - Minimum Wage Laws
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-12-2004, 10:31 AM

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