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Thread: Excessive Tardiness...

  1. #1
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    Default Excessive Tardiness...

    We are a small business in Florida (9 employees) and have an issue with excessive tardiness (30 min late on a daily basis) as well as frequent absenteeism. In our business we need a full staff on a daily business and this can not be tolerated.... but we are hesitant to fire employees due to unemployment policies. What are the requirements on how to deal with this? We keep warning notices- oral and written- is this enough as an employer to keep the fired employee from unemployment eligibility?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by counterrev View Post
    We keep warning notices- oral and written- is this enough as an employer to keep the fired employee from unemployment eligibility?
    Quite possibly, although it is sometimes difficult to predict what the unemployment folks will decide (they recently decided that one of my former employees, who dropped her pants -- with no underwear on -- in front of several co-workers did not constitute misconduct).

    The problem of tardiness is probably easier to take care of than the absences, if the employee claims to have been absent due to illness AND called in.

    Document the absences and late arrivals, warn the employee in writing and be sure that the warning indicates that future occurences could result in termination.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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    Agreed. There is never a guarantee (in either direction) when it comes to unemployment. But if you can demonstrate that the employee knew that their behavior can lead to termination, you usually can prevail.

    Personally, I think you need to be taking a hard look at which is going to be more detrimental to your business in the long run; employees who feel they don't have to follow company policy and are very likely costing your business considerable money, or an occasional unemployment claim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cbg View Post
    Personally, I think you need to be taking a hard look at which is going to be more detrimental to your business in the long run; employees who feel they don't have to follow company policy and are very likely costing your business considerable money, or an occasional unemployment claim.
    The costs to the company for unemployment claims are insignificant.

    More likely, the reluctance to fire substandard employees comes from the prospect of losing what little production they had until they are replaced AND the costs of finding a replacement.

    However, if the employees ever get the idea that fear of the costs of firing them (for whatever reason) keeps the company from doing so, then the company can expect a lot of abuse from the employees.

    Set the standards. Enforce them. Ruthlessly. This sounds so horrible, but it is not.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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    The costs to the company for unemployment claims are insignificant.

    My point exactly.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by counterrev View Post
    We are a small business in Florida (9 employees) and have an issue with excessive tardiness (30 min late on a daily basis) as well as frequent absenteeism. In our business we need a full staff on a daily business and this can not be tolerated.... but we are hesitant to fire employees due to unemployment policies. What are the requirements on how to deal with this? We keep warning notices- oral and written- is this enough as an employer to keep the fired employee from unemployment eligibility?
    So you'd rather let most of your employees be chronically late and impair your business activities than potentially pay for a few unemployment claims??? That makes no sense. Besides, if you utilize progressive discipline for the chronically tardy employees and advise them in writing that they will be terminated if they continue to be late, the chances of them receiving UC benefits from the State goes waaaaay down.

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