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Thread: Notice to change posted shift time

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    California
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    Default Notice to change posted shift time

    How little time is ok for an employer to change your shift. Our work schedules are posted for the week on Thursdays, but our temporary manager (sandwich shop is new) has been calling employees as late as 8 in the morning and moving their start time from 8:30 to 10:30. He's also calling people in with expected fifteen minutes notice who weren't scheduled for that day. Childcare is a NIGHTMARE for these people. There has been no agreement to have "on call" people to cover gaps. I'll be the manager after store has been open 90 days, 24 days from now. So, I need to know from that perspective, what are the rules?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
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    Massachusetts
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    Default

    There aren't any.

    Your employer can change your schedule with as much or as little notice as he wishes/has. In fact, since your state is one of the few with a reporting time requirement, it's only common sense that they should be able to stop you from coming in to work if they find at the beginning of the day that they're not going to have enough work for you.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    California
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    Default Notice to change posted shift time

    If my employer changes my time to ten to eight and gives me the call after i've left the house for errands before work, can he write me up for being late for work, since he didn't change my beginning of shift time till I was out of contact? He's calling it an unreliabilty issue since I apparenty can't be in the right place at the right time. I would just love to know when the right time is. And, what is the point of having a company policy posted shift schedule every Thursday if it's just changed on a whim? Hope this can all straighten out. I like working there.

    Teri

  4. #4
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    Default

    Have you considered taking up the matter with his supervisor or more so, finding another job?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator
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    They can. I'm not saying it would be fair. But it would be legal.

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