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Thread: How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

  1. #1
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    Hi:

    I want to open an account with a bank in a foreign country, UK. I live
    in California (CA). The bank requests, in order for them to comply with
    regulations, that I provide proof of identity and residence address by
    sending them a form accompanied by *notarized copies of documents* such
    as my ID or passport, and a utility bill, tax form, or bank statement
    showing my address.

    But no CA notary can/will perform this certification process. I have
    called various notaries, and lawyers, and it seems nobody has a
    solution. Perhaps I can get an official transcript of my IRS tax
    return. I will find out if that will satisfy them. Or an original bank
    statement instead of a copy.

    I will call the DMV on Monday to see if they can give me a certified
    copy of my ID.

    I don't have much confidence in the DMV.

    Can anyone produce a certified copy of a passport?

    It seems the requirements in UK don't understand the limitations of
    notaries in the USA, and also they assume that there is some public
    office where a government official performs this service.

    What other options are there to get certified copies of documents such
    as these?

    Thanks for input.



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  2. #2
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 19:36:12 -0700, CC <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net>
    wrote:
    Hi:I want to open an account with a bank in a foreign country, UK. I livein California (CA). The bank requests, in order for them to comply withregulations, that I provide proof of identity and residence address bysending them a form accompanied by *notarized copies of documents* suchas my ID or passport, and a utility bill, tax form, or bank statementshowing my address.
    A "notarized copy" of a document is not a "certified copy." A notary
    is someone who witnesses oaths. "Certification" is a process whereby
    the custodian of a public document authenticates a copy as being
    identical to the original in his possession.

    You "notarize" something by swearing an oath in the presence of the
    notary concerning the document and he affixes a "jurat" which attests
    that he witnessed your oath. A typical example is where you swear in
    the presence of a notary that your signature on a deed is really
    yours. The only way you can "notarize" a personal document, like your
    phone bill, is to write out an oath that it is genuine, sign it, and
    then have your signature "notarized." The notary is not guaranteeing
    that the phone bill is genuine, but he is guaranteeing that you swore
    it was genuine in his presence.
    But no CA notary can/will perform this certification process. I havecalled various notaries, and lawyers, and it seems nobody has asolution. Perhaps I can get an official transcript of my IRS taxreturn. I will find out if that will satisfy them. Or an original bankstatement instead of a copy.I will call the DMV on Monday to see if they can give me a certifiedcopy of my ID.I don't have much confidence in the DMV.Can anyone produce a certified copy of a passport?It seems the requirements in UK don't understand the limitations ofnotaries in the USA, and also they assume that there is some publicoffice where a government official performs this service.What other options are there to get certified copies of documents suchas these?Thanks for input.

    - Jon Beaver

  3. #3
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    You are dealing with the wrong bank. Find one that has done this before,
    and ask what other customers have submitted in the way of documentation. If
    necessary, you could ask them what regulations they are trying to comply
    with, then get a copy of those regulations, but this won't be necessary when
    dealing with a sophisticated bank.

    McGyver

    "CC" <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net> wrote in message
    news:dh52es02hs2@news4.newsguy.com...
    Hi: I want to open an account with a bank in a foreign country, UK. I live in California (CA). The bank requests, in order for them to comply with regulations, that I provide proof of identity and residence address by sending them a form accompanied by *notarized copies of documents* such as my ID or passport, and a utility bill, tax form, or bank statement showing my address. But no CA notary can/will perform this certification process. I have called various notaries, and lawyers, and it seems nobody has a solution. Perhaps I can get an official transcript of my IRS tax return. I will find out if that will satisfy them. Or an original bank statement instead of a copy. I will call the DMV on Monday to see if they can give me a certified copy of my ID. I don't have much confidence in the DMV. Can anyone produce a certified copy of a passport? It seems the requirements in UK don't understand the limitations of notaries in the USA, and also they assume that there is some public office where a government official performs this service. What other options are there to get certified copies of documents such as these? Thanks for input. -- _____________________ CC crobc@bunkjunkfieldremovethis@sbcglobal.net SuSE 9.1 Linux 2.6.5


  4. #4
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    McGyver wrote:
    You are dealing with the wrong bank. Find one that has done this before, and ask what other customers have submitted in the way of documentation. If necessary, you could ask them what regulations they are trying to comply with, then get a copy of those regulations, but this won't be necessary when dealing with a sophisticated bank. McGyver

    Thanks for your input.

    Here is the place that specifies what is required and why:

    http://goldmoney.com/en/cap.html


    Maybe I would benefit from finding a lawyer in the US that works on UK
    business and banking law?


    Good day!


    --
    _____________________
    Christopher R. Carlen
    crobc@bogus-remove-me.sbcglobal.net
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  5. #5
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    "CC" <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net> wrote in message
    news:dh6llj0oud@news2.newsguy.com...
    McGyver wrote:
    You are dealing with the wrong bank. Find one that has done this before, and ask what other customers have submitted in the way of documentation. If necessary, you could ask them what regulations they are trying to comply with, then get a copy of those regulations, but this won't be necessary when dealing with a sophisticated bank. McGyver
    Thanks for your input. Here is the place that specifies what is required and why: http://goldmoney.com/en/cap.html Maybe I would benefit from finding a lawyer in the US that works on UK business and banking law?
    There are firms that do that sort of thing, including the biggest law firm
    of all, Baker Mackenzie. They have offices in major cities and could advise
    on anything concerning business and banking. I didn't look at the linked
    site because I'm not an expert in that field and therefore couldn't advise
    even if I learned the company's requirements. If that site contains the
    actual law that the company is citing as the reasons for their policies, I
    suggest that you print it and take it, along with the company's policies and
    requirements, to an attorney experienced in that field.

    McGyver



  6. #6
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    Looks to me that all you would have to do is take the required docuentation,
    and the form that needs to be notarized, to any bank in California where you
    have a banking account. Ask them for their help and/or just fill out the
    form and ask them to notarize the form. Your California bank will have a
    notary and will stamp the form with a notary stamp. They may also have a
    device to create a raised seal on the form. Your California bank will not
    be certiying anything. It will just be notarizing the form which you
    present to them which states who you are, where you live, etc. As a notary
    public, the person doing the notarizing is acknowledging that the person
    before him/her is the person named in the form and is the person who signed
    it in the presence of the notary.

    "CC" <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net> wrote in message
    news:dh6llj0oud@news2.newsguy.com...
    McGyver wrote:
    You are dealing with the wrong bank. Find one that has done this before, and ask what other customers have submitted in the way of documentation. If necessary, you could ask them what regulations they are trying to comply with, then get a copy of those regulations, but this won't be necessary when dealing with a sophisticated bank. McGyver
    Thanks for your input. Here is the place that specifies what is required and why: http://goldmoney.com/en/cap.html Maybe I would benefit from finding a lawyer in the US that works on UK business and banking law? Good day! -- _____________________ Christopher R. Carlen crobc@bogus-remove-me.sbcglobal.net SuSE 9.1 Linux 2.6.5


  7. #7
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    Sam343 wrote:
    Looks to me that all you would have to do is take the required docuentation, and the form that needs to be notarized, to any bank in California where you have a banking account. Ask them for their help and/or just fill out the form and ask them to notarize the form. Your California bank will have a notary and will stamp the form with a notary stamp. They may also have a device to create a raised seal on the form. Your California bank will not be certiying anything. It will just be notarizing the form which you present to them which states who you are, where you live, etc. As a notary public, the person doing the notarizing is acknowledging that the person before him/her is the person named in the form and is the person who signed it in the presence of the notary.
    Thanks for the input.

    I did take it to a bank, and they refused. They could notarize my
    signature on the form, I suppose, since this is a notary function.
    However, the notary specifically told me that they cannot "notarize" a
    copy of my ID, which is what the policy of the "bank" to which I am
    applying for an account requires.

    So the remaining stumbling block right now is a copy of my ID. So far,
    no one will provide me anything here in the way or a certification.

    I will try more notaries, perhaps, since I have only tried 2. But their
    messages were very consistent. They cannot certify copies of anything.

    My notary services form from my main bank says that actually this IS a
    service that their notaries can perform, but this bank is based in New
    Mexico. In CA, the notaries all say they cannot do it because of CA law.

    So far, the UK "bank" has stated they will accept an original of my
    utility bill/bank statement type document for proof of residence.

    Good day!





    --
    _____________________
    Christopher R. Carlen
    crobc@bogus-remove-me.sbcglobal.net
    SuSE 9.1 Linux 2.6.5

  8. #8
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    1,067

    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    "CC" <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net> wrote in message
    news:dhcuqk0mqn@news1.newsguy.com...
    Sam343 wrote:
    Looks to me that all you would have to do is take the required docuentation, and the form that needs to be notarized, to any bank in California where you have a banking account. Ask them for their help and/or just fill out the form and ask them to notarize the form. Your California bank will have a notary and will stamp the form with a notary stamp. They may also have a device to create a raised seal on the form. Your California bank will not be certiying anything. It will just be notarizing the form which you present to them which states who you are, where you live, etc. As a notary public, the person doing the notarizing is acknowledging that the person before him/her is the person named in the form and is the person who signed it in the presence of the notary.
    Thanks for the input. I did take it to a bank, and they refused. They could notarize my signature on the form, I suppose, since this is a notary function. However, the notary specifically told me that they cannot "notarize" a copy of my ID, which is what the policy of the "bank" to which I am applying for an account requires. So the remaining stumbling block right now is a copy of my ID. So far, no one will provide me anything here in the way or a certification. I will try more notaries, perhaps, since I have only tried 2. But their messages were very consistent. They cannot certify copies of anything. My notary services form from my main bank says that actually this IS a service that their notaries can perform, but this bank is based in New Mexico. In CA, the notaries all say they cannot do it because of CA law. So far, the UK "bank" has stated they will accept an original of my utility bill/bank statement type document for proof of residence.
    If all you need is a notarized copy of your ID, that's easy if the form of
    ID is one that may be legally photocopied. If so, here's how to handle it.
    Make a good photocopy of your ID. Put that photocopy in your printer. Type
    up a statement saying that you certify that the above photocopy of
    such-and-such ID, number such-and-such, is a true and accurate copy of the
    original. Take the statement to any notary public and ask that your
    signature on the statement be notarized. If you are asked whether you want
    a jurat or an acknowledgement, choose jurat. Sign the statement in the
    notary's presence. The notary will add the notorial certification and
    stamp. Some notaries have mechanical embossers which put dents in the
    paper. Ask that the embosser be used in addition to the inked stamp. Then
    make a photocopy of the notarized statement for your records and send the
    original off.

    McGyver



  9. #9
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    Default How to get certified copies of documents in CA?

    McGyver wrote:
    "CC" <somewhere@overthe.rainbow.net> wrote in message news:dhcuqk0mqn@news1.newsguy.com...
    Sam343 wrote:
    Looks to me that all you would have to do is take the requireddocuentation, and the form that needs to be notarized, to any bank inCalifornia where you have a banking account. Ask them for their helpand/or just fill out the form and ask them to notarize the form. YourCalifornia bank will have a notary and will stamp the form with a notarystamp. They may also have a device to create a raised seal on the form.Your California bank will not be certiying anything. It will just benotarizing the form which you present to them which states who you are,where you live, etc. As a notary public, the person doing the notarizingis acknowledging that the person before him/her is the person named inthe form and is the person who signed it in the presence of the notary.
    Thanks for the input.I did take it to a bank, and they refused. They could notarize mysignature on the form, I suppose, since this is a notary function.However, the notary specifically told me that they cannot "notarize" acopy of my ID, which is what the policy of the "bank" to which I amapplying for an account requires.So the remaining stumbling block right now is a copy of my ID. So far, noone will provide me anything here in the way or a certification.I will try more notaries, perhaps, since I have only tried 2. But theirmessages were very consistent. They cannot certify copies of anything.My notary services form from my main bank says that actually this IS aservice that their notaries can perform, but this bank is based in NewMexico. In CA, the notaries all say they cannot do it because of CA law.So far, the UK "bank" has stated they will accept an original of myutility bill/bank statement type document for proof of residence.
    If all you need is a notarized copy of your ID, that's easy if the form of ID is one that may be legally photocopied. If so, here's how to handle it. Make a good photocopy of your ID. Put that photocopy in your printer. Type up a statement saying that you certify that the above photocopy of such-and-such ID, number such-and-such, is a true and accurate copy of the original. Take the statement to any notary public and ask that your signature on the statement be notarized. If you are asked whether you want a jurat or an acknowledgement, choose jurat. Sign the statement in the notary's presence. The notary will add the notorial certification and stamp. Some notaries have mechanical embossers which put dents in the paper. Ask that the embosser be used in addition to the inked stamp. Then make a photocopy of the notarized statement for your records and send the original off. McGyver

    Yes, that is a Jurat. I think I will give it a shot.

    Thanks for the input.

    Good day!


    --
    _____________________
    Christopher R. Carlen
    crobc@bogus-remove-me.sbcglobal.net
    SuSE 9.1 Linux 2.6.5

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