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Thread: Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

  1. #1
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The very
    same act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I was
    not jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to my
    livelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account.

    I have given up the struggle of living as a felon and have not made a single
    payment to the probation office in over a year and I have no desire to do
    so. I have not done any community service and I have not paid the imposed
    fines. I've failed to report my whereabouts to the probation officer but I
    eventually call or stop in and get yelled at a bit and tell them that I've
    been living with friends here or there. While on probation, I was arrested
    for an unpaid traffic warrant and served time. I'd like to do the same with
    community service and all pending fines.

    I've asked for jail time in lieu of probation but I'm simply told that I was
    given probation and not jail. I've asked to speak to the judge about
    getting this over with but he will not see me. I'd really like to negotiate
    time in jail and get the probation, community service, and fines done away
    with so that I can move on. What can be done to get this over with quickly?
    Compliance is not an option. Please advise.





  2. #2
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another


    "indigent" <none@indigent.com> wrote in message
    news:r1IBd.36188$wD4.25587@fe1.texas.rr.com...
    I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The very same act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I
    was
    not jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to my livelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account. I have given up the struggle of living as a felon and have not made a
    single
    payment to the probation office in over a year and I have no desire to do so. I have not done any community service and I have not paid the imposed fines. I've failed to report my whereabouts to the probation officer but
    I
    eventually call or stop in and get yelled at a bit and tell them that I've been living with friends here or there. While on probation, I was
    arrested
    for an unpaid traffic warrant and served time. I'd like to do the same
    with
    community service and all pending fines. I've asked for jail time in lieu of probation but I'm simply told that I
    was
    given probation and not jail. I've asked to speak to the judge about getting this over with but he will not see me. I'd really like to
    negotiate
    time in jail and get the probation, community service, and fines done away with so that I can move on. What can be done to get this over with
    quickly?
    Compliance is not an option. Please advise.

    I'm not a lawyer, but I am experienced in pro se representation of myself in
    corrupted status quo courts.

    Initially, all I can tell you at this time is you have not included the
    necessary information in your post to even enable me to conduct effective
    legal research in search of the remedy you seek.

    1.) Are you still on probation at this time, and if so, how close are you to
    completing it?

    2.) What was the length in years or months of the probation imposed?

    3.) What state sentenced you to probation?


    That being said, I would ask you why you consider incarceration to be
    preferable to community service? However, such a preference is strictly your
    business, so there is no reason to respond on this issue.

    I do feel it important to inform you that if you are still on probation the
    issues are a little more complicated than simply laying out some fines and
    court costs in the county jail. In most jurisdictions revocation of a
    probated sentence on a felony matter would result in you being sentenced to
    the state penitentiary for the full duration of the sentence. In other
    words, if you were given three years probation, you would be sentence to
    three years in prison, no matter if you had completed two years, eleven
    months, and twnty-nine days of probation before it was revoked. And count on
    all fines and court costs being in effect upon your discharge from state
    custody.

    It would be a different matter altogether if you have completed your
    probation. It would be my thought that any orders of the court concerning
    community service w tohegeld be unenforcable. Of course fines and court
    costs are always enforcable by incarceration at so much credit per day for
    refusal or neglect to pay.

    Taking all the above factors into consideration is necessary to make a
    minimally informed decision as to how you may best resolve your legal
    problems.

    As for the judge refusing to see you, that should be simple enough to solve.
    Write a letter to the judge and caption it with the case number of the
    criminal case you were sentenced upon, and file it in the court clerks
    office.

    And if all else fails, don't despair. Another felony case could not fail to
    get the attention of the judge so that he will insist that you appear before
    him.

    Dane



  3. #3
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another


    "Dane Metcalfe" <quack_deala@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:41d78750$1_3@127.0.0.1...
    1.) Are you still on probation at this time, and if so, how close are you to completing it?
    About 7 1/2 more years.
    2.) What was the length in years or months of the probation imposed?
    10 years.
    3.) What state sentenced you to probation?
    Texas.
    That being said, I would ask you why you consider incarceration to be preferable to community service? However, such a preference is strictly your business, so there is no reason to respond on this issue.
    It would be easier on me. As things stand, I have no transportation, no
    income, clothes... Working at this point would really be too difficult and
    pointless.
    I do feel it important to inform you that if you are still on probation the issues are a little more complicated than simply laying out some fines and court costs in the county jail. In most jurisdictions revocation of a probated sentence on a felony matter would result in you being sentenced to the state penitentiary for the full duration of the sentence.
    Maybe the sentence can be shortened i.e. 1-3 years + current time (almost 2
    years)? This would be my ideal situation.
    In other words, if you were given three years probation, you would be sentence to three years in prison, no matter if you had completed two years, eleven months, and twnty-nine days of probation before it was revoked. And count on all fines and court costs being in effect upon your discharge from state custody.
    When I was arrested on traffic tickets recently, I specifically asked the
    judge that I wanted to serve the full sentence in jail as payment in full.
    My fine of $432 or so was reduced to $75. Since I had spent that night in
    jail, time was served. Zero balance. I'd like the same to apply to fines
    and community service.
    It would be a different matter altogether if you have completed your probation. It would be my thought that any orders of the court concerning community service w tohegeld be unenforcable. Of course fines and court costs are always enforcable by incarceration at so much credit per day for refusal or neglect to pay.
    Yes, I'd like to be credited per day. I'm tired of hanging around here and
    there.
    Taking all the above factors into consideration is necessary to make a minimally informed decision as to how you may best resolve your legal problems. As for the judge refusing to see you, that should be simple enough to solve. Write a letter to the judge and caption it with the case number of the criminal case you were sentenced upon, and file it in the court clerks office. And if all else fails, don't despair. Another felony case could not fail to get the attention of the judge so that he will insist that you appear before him.
    Another felony case is not an option as I am not a criminal.

    Respectfully,

    Indigent Guy



  4. #4
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Dane,

    By the way, I know two different individuals who has been sentenced in
    Texas. One got a 2 year probation sentence in 2001. He never made
    payments, got pissed off at his probation officer and demanded to serve his
    time in prison (so he claims). He was sentenced to 8 months in prison. He
    was discharged after his release and didn't have to pay a cent.

    Another more recent friend was sentenced to 10 years in prison and served 5
    years before being released on parole. He totally violated and went missing
    for a few years until he was involved in a bad auto accident that left him
    just about crippled. He called the probation office and was told that his
    case had been discharged. Today, he is a pan handler with a severe limp and
    although an alcoholic, has no troubles with the law.

    Doesn't the judge have the power to modify his assesed sentence? Like I
    said, I'm looking for a way to get this over with as quickly as possible and
    probation is simply not working out. Some people are great candidates while
    others arn't.

    Respectfully,

    Indigent Guy



  5. #5
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    indigent wrote:
    I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The very same act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I was not jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to my livelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account.
    Why should that be? I know a fellow, a truck driver, who also has such a
    black mark against his name. Back thirty-some years ago, he had to drop a
    load in some urban inner-city area. While there, he saw some guy rip the CB
    radio out of his cab. So he grabbed a baseball bat out of the out of the
    storage bin under the sleeper, and accosted him with it. The guy, who had
    the CB radio under his arm, tried to make a run for it, so he dropped the bat
    and grabbed him. A couple of punches were exchanged, and he got his radio
    back -- but by then the cops were upon them.

    To make a long story short, HE got charged with felony battery -- because a
    "deadly weapon" (the bat, which never got used) was involved -- and he had to
    go to court to face the music. And they never even charged other guy. So
    he got a lawyer, and in court the prosecutor refused any plea-bargain. So he
    was convicted and sentenced to probation.

    But he is a convicted felon, and has been for over 30 years. He figures it
    had something to do with the fact that he and his lawyer were one color,
    while the "victim" and the cops and the judge and the prosecutor (and nearly
    everyone else in the courtroom) were another. And he's not the color that
    allows him to cry "racism".

    Today, he STILL drives truck. And he owns his home. And he has credit good
    enough that he can co-sign a loan on a pickup truck for his lazy, no-good,
    shiftless son-in-law -- his words. (Of course, the terminology might have
    something to do with the fact that the lazy, no-good, shiftless son-in-law
    wasn't able to keep up payments, and he had to go repossess the pickup.)

    And he says that, whenever he has to fill out an application for something
    and they ask "Have you ever been convicted of a felony?", the answer to that
    is always "no".
    --
    Theodore A. Kaldis
    kaldis@worldnet.att.net

  6. #6
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Theodore A. "Tyre-Iron Teddi" Kaldis wrote:
    indigent wrote:
    I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The verysame act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I wasnot jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to mylivelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account.
    Why should that be? I know a fellow, a truck driver, who also has such a black mark against his name. Back thirty-some years ago, he had to drop a load in some urban inner-city area. While there, he saw some guy rip the CB radio out of his cab. So he grabbed a baseball bat out of the out of the storage bin under the sleeper, and accosted him with it. The guy, who had the CB radio under his arm, tried to make a run for it, so he dropped the bat and grabbed him. A couple of punches were exchanged, and he got his radio back -- but by then the cops were upon them. To make a long story short, HE got charged with felony battery -- because a "deadly weapon" (the bat, which never got used) was involved -- and he had to go to court to face the music.
    And of course, when you and your mates agreed to use that tyre-iron
    of yours to relieve some "*****" of some folding money so that you could
    go out and buy some beer, it wasn't conspiracy to commit a felony? LOL!

    Your only defense was the "Cam Brown Defense": Unfathomable
    stupidity.



  7. #7
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Thank you kindly for the snippets, I've read them and will keep them for
    future reference and consideration. I appreciate that.
    How 'bout them Sooners?
    I don't watch sports and in fact, I had to look up 'Sooners'.

    Respectfully,

    Indigent Guy



  8. #8
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Theodore,

    Can you imagine the feeling of having your own home with about $60,000 in
    equity, two late model cars paid off, good credit...and a decent life all
    gone in almost the blink of an eye. And a career that paid a fair salary
    but required a squeaky clean record.

    For me, it's poverty and pain if I work and pay fines, fees, probation
    costs, community service...and it's poverty and pain if I don't. I'd just
    like to get this probation stuff over with as soon as possible in hopes of
    getting a reduced time in prison. Like I said, compliance is not an option
    and I will not be enslaved and extorted from. No one can gain financially
    from my destruction. Serving time is the only way. It may have been
    different if I had something left to lose.

    I've been staying in some people's backyard shed (no sink or bathroom, no
    water or kitchen) and it's very cold in here. I still have my laptop and
    access to electricity and a wireless card for my internet connection to the
    router in the home. For me, there is no desire left to struggle with work
    as I have been set up for complete failure. I owe at least15k in taxes at
    the moment. It is clear that there is no recovery for me and I will not try
    and fool myself into thinking that things can get better. I am at an age
    where I have recently noticed a few grey hairs popping up, too young to die
    anytime soon and too old to start over.

    No Theodore, I am not as strong as your friend.

    Regards,

    Indigent Guy

    P.S. This felony would be a lower class misdemeanor in several other
    states, I've carefully looked into various state penal codes. I'm either
    going to serve my time and get it over with or I am going to abscond. I've
    verbally gone over this with my probation officer to no avail. Not even my
    11 month old traffic ticket warrant helped speed things up. After my
    release from jail, I went to the probation officer and reported the fact
    that I had been in jail. I was told that the judge did not need to know
    about this since it was only a traffic ticket. Dane had previously advised
    me to write the judge. I don't want to do anything formal that may stir the
    water and cause retribution. Several months back I did walk into the judges
    chambers (not the court room). The judge looked at me but then his bailiff
    escorted me out and viciously told me that I was not allowed to see the
    judge. I'm in limbo and in complete and utter misery.



  9. #9
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    indigent wrote:
    Theodore,
    [snipped]

    No Theodore, I am not as strong as your friend. Regards, Indigent Guy
    Theodore don't give a **** about anyone but him and his. To curry
    his "favour," you must pledge undying affection for his perverted
    version of a god, and he expects you to admit that you really deserved
    what you got -- because his god (and his "anointed ones" in authority)
    never punishes anyone (except members of his family indicted for the
    apparent murder of their illegitimate four-year-old daughters) without
    reason.


  10. #10
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Ken Smith wrote:
    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    indigent wrote:
    I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The very same act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I was not jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to my livelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account.
    Why should that be? I know a fellow, a truck driver, who also has such a black mark against his name. Back thirty-some years ago, he had to drop a load in some urban inner-city area. While there, he saw some guy rip the CB radio out of his cab. So he grabbed a baseball bat out of the out of the storage bin under the sleeper, and accosted him with it. The guy, who had the CB radio under his arm, tried to make a run for it, so he dropped the bat and grabbed him. A couple of punches were exchanged, and he got his radio back -- but by then the cops were upon them.
    To make a long story short, HE got charged with felony battery -- because a "deadly weapon" (the bat, which never got used) was involved -- and he had to go to court to face the music.
    And of course, when you and your mates agreed to use that tyre-iron of yours to relieve some "*****" of some folding money so that you could go out and buy some beer, it wasn't conspiracy to commit a felony? LOL!
    No such agreement was ever made. And had someone suggested doing something
    like this, I would have wanted no part of it.
    --
    Theodore A. Kaldis
    kaldis@worldnet.att.net

  11. #11
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Ken Smith wrote:
    indigent wrote:
    Theodore,
    [snipped]
    No Theodore, I am not as strong as your friend.
    Regards,
    Indigent Guy
    Theodore don't give a **** about anyone but him and his. To curry his "favour," you must pledge undying affection for his perverted version of a god, and he expects you to admit that you really deserved what you got -- because his god (and his "anointed ones" in authority) never punishes anyone (except members of his family indicted for the apparent murder of their illegitimate four-year-old daughters) without reason.
    Readers unacquainted with Ken Smith (and that would include few, if any, in
    misc.legal) should know that Ken was asked to submit to a psychological
    examination by the Examiners' Board of the Colorado Bar Association when he
    applied to become a lawyer in that state. After you've read a few of Ken's
    messages, you might better understand why the Examiners' Board were inclined
    to question his psychological fitness.

    BTW, he refused to take the psychological exam, and so: no law licence for
    Ken Smith. In 11 days from today, Ken will be eligible to reapply to the
    Colorado Bar. But he still is obliged to demonstrate psychological fitness
    before they will give him a licence to practise law.
    --
    Theodore A. Kaldis
    kaldis@worldnet.att.net

  12. #12
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Rob,

    It's amazing how ones life can change from one moment to the next, I'm very
    sorry that happened to you. I used to be a "tough on crime" kind of guy and
    I believed all of the bull out there. I once worked for the county court of
    Maricopa, AZ. I used to look at the "scuz balls in chains". Little could I
    have imagined that I'd be walking around in chains in Texas a few years
    later. Oh how the tables have turned.

    At first, my probation officer was handing me employment worksheets and
    everyone was eager to help me. I was getting daily calls on my cell and all
    kinds of appointments until they realized that I had simply given up. I had
    mentioned that the cops who had arrested me on an 11 month old warrant
    didn't even want to take me in, they wanted me to ask someone for the money
    but I insisted they arrest me so that it would help get things over with.
    Nobody wanted to even get close to me because I stank so badly. What is
    funny, now I jaywalk wherever I want and nobody seems to notice. This has
    affected my social life, friends don't want me in their car or in their
    homes. They still talk to me and give me food but they say that I stink too
    much, but like I said, I don't have acces to a bathroom. In fact, I washup
    and shave at the probation department's bathroom. There is warm water,
    soap, paper towls, etc.

    I'm supposed to be doing therapy and drug testing and a bunch of other crap
    that I can't even remember right now. Other than showing my mug on
    occasion, they don't even know where I'm at or how to contact me because
    I've been moving around just about at anyone who will provide shelter for
    me. I've only had one piss test too boot! They used to ask me, "any drugs
    or alchol" and I said "yes" once. I was told that I was not supposed to be
    drinking. Now they don't ask me because I simply tell the truth each and
    every time. There is no reason for me to lie. I don't like living this way
    but I don't know what else to do. I try sleeping as much as possible to
    forget about the pain. I'd like to begin collecting social security if I
    could (I faithfully worked since I was 17 years of age) and just live a
    decent life, free of all of the world's problems.

    Best Regards,

    Indigent Guy



  13. #13
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "indigent" <none@indigent.com>
    Newsgroups: misc.legal
    Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2005 12:09 PM
    Subject: Re: Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Theodore, Can you imagine the feeling of having your own home with about $60,000 in equity, two late model cars paid off, good credit...and a decent life all gone in almost the blink of an eye. And a career that paid a fair salary but required a squeaky clean record. For me, it's poverty and pain if I work and pay fines, fees, probation costs, community service...and it's poverty and pain if I don't. I'd just like to get this probation stuff over with as soon as possible in hopes of getting a reduced time in prison. Like I said, compliance is not an
    option
    and I will not be enslaved and extorted from. No one can gain financially from my destruction. Serving time is the only way. It may have been different if I had something left to lose.

    Your above statement implies an additional option not considered by me in
    my other responses. You might consider seeking employent for lower wages
    than you are accustomed to, provided that you at least make enough to
    provide
    basic living expenses so that you can provide yourself food, shelter and
    clothing.

    This alone would go far to relieve you of your circumstances you find so
    painful.

    After you have accomplished providing yourself some independance of relying
    upon
    others for your basic needs, you will have improved your circumstances
    exponentially.

    If it was me, and I decided upon this course of action, I would look at this
    as being my
    first step in an over all strategy conceived to provide the best that
    could be had from a
    bad situation.

    I would consider that if the preferable wages allowing me to support myself
    and meet the financial
    obligations of my probations were not obtainable, then my first obligation
    to myself would demand
    that I earn what is necessary to meet my basic human needs. If I felt the
    burden imposed by the fines, fees,
    etc are too great,I would shop for jobs that would pay me enough to meet the
    requirements I felt necessary
    to give me my minimal accepted standard of quality of life, but nothing
    more.

    Such a strategy employed by you would dictate that all of your wages and
    living expenses be carefully documented and recorded so that they could be
    used in support
    of an affirmative defense if revocation proceedings are brought against you
    for
    not making payments that you find objectionable. Of course the opportunities
    will always be there for
    you to fudge enough so that you enjoy recreational activities and whatnot.

    It would be a good idea to establish a good faith effort on your part to
    comply with your probation
    by showing that you are meeting at least some of your comminity service
    requirements. Perhaps you can conceive a plan
    that secretly provides you with the biggest end of the stick. Just as an
    example to give you ideas, consider a plan
    which consists of helping jailed inmates with legal research so that they
    might be afforded access to the courts.
    Every hour "donated" for community service would actually be an hour
    invested in yourself towards an education
    you might someday use for obtaining the best resolution hoped for
    concerning your probation!

    It's no small consideration either that effective "writ writers" in prison
    can maintain an above average prison
    lifestyle for their services.

    The above strategy might give you the factual evidence and legal skills
    necessary to effectively apply the affirmative defense
    provisioned by the Texas Statutes should revocation proceedings be initiated
    against you for your failure to meet the payment
    obligations conditional to your probation.

    At the very least, the facts taken into consideration by the judge would be

    1.) You are employed and self supporting and therefor a productive member of
    society.
    2.) That even though you were unable to meet your payment obligations, you
    still met any conditions
    of your probation that was possibly within your power to comply with by
    performing community
    service.
    3.) You were able to show grounds of an affirmative defense that even if
    rejected by the court still carries a certain amount
    of weight for some granting of leniency.

    Which would all together most likely operate to provide you with a
    considerbale amount of extenuating circumstances in your favor
    which you would be lacking at the present time if you were faced with a
    revocation hearing today.


    I now have one very important question for you to consider. Relying upon a
    strategy similar to the one I have just presented,
    what could be the most adverse consequnce imposed upon you? Would it not be
    your satisfying your obligations to the court
    by incarceration instead of by payment, which is the very relief you asked
    how you might obtain in your initial post to begin with?


    I've been staying in some people's backyard shed (no sink or bathroom, no water or kitchen) and it's very cold in here. I still have my laptop and access to electricity and a wireless card for my internet connection to
    the
    router in the home. For me, there is no desire left to struggle with work as I have been set up for complete failure. I owe at least15k in taxes at the moment. It is clear that there is no recovery for me and I will not
    try
    and fool myself into thinking that things can get better. I am at an age where I have recently noticed a few grey hairs popping up, too young to
    die
    anytime soon and too old to start over. No Theodore, I am not as strong as your friend. Regards, Indigent Guy P.S. This felony would be a lower class misdemeanor in several other states, I've carefully looked into various state penal codes. I'm either going to serve my time and get it over with or I am going to abscond.
    I've
    verbally gone over this with my probation officer to no avail. Not even
    my
    11 month old traffic ticket warrant helped speed things up. After my release from jail, I went to the probation officer and reported the fact that I had been in jail. I was told that the judge did not need to know about this since it was only a traffic ticket. Dane had previously
    advised
    me to write the judge. I don't want to do anything formal that may stir
    the
    water and cause retribution. Several months back I did walk into the
    judges
    chambers (not the court room). The judge looked at me but then his
    bailiff
    escorted me out and viciously told me that I was not allowed to see the judge. I'm in limbo and in complete and utter misery.
    I can clarify this for you. First, understand that you were in serious
    violation of protocol walking into a judges chambers without invitation or
    permission.I very seriously doubt that members of the bar would contemplate
    doing that.

    Secondly, a judge has no reason to consider a request from a lawyerless
    citizen that are made verbally and are not made a part of the court record
    by being transcribed by a court reporter.

    For illustrative purposes, lets say you are a defendant in a criminal case
    and you desire to represent ypourself. So, you tell the judge of your
    intent. It would almost be a certainty that he would deny you on the grounds
    that you are either incompetant, or have failed to show competance. Which
    would be true.

    However, if you made the same request in a written instrument filed with the
    court clerk, it becomes a matter of the court record that must be ruled upon
    by a hearing where you would be advised you will be held to the same
    procedural rules as an attorney and urged to accept counsel. At that point,
    if you hold your ground, it becomes moot whether you are incompetant or not,
    you will prevail.Otherwise it would be reversable error.


    The reason I advised you to write a letter to the judge and file it was for
    a reason. The courts have consistently held that pro se pleadings must be
    liberally construed.Therefore, it matters not what you title it.It must be
    considered by the relief requested, not by the title. A simple letter would
    be preferable in your present circumstances because it would have
    immediately informed the judge that you arent making legal claims about
    things you know nothing about, but instead are appearing as a burdened
    defendant seeking relief in the only way available to you.

    Feel free to email me of you ever need help on this and I'm not around.

    Dane



  14. #14
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    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    Ken Smith wrote:
    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    indigent wrote:
    >I was convicted of a felony (3rd degree) a couple of years ago. The very>same act in a number of other states would be a misdemeanor--period. I>was not jailed but put on probation. The conviction has meant an end to>my livelihood. I lost my job, my home, my cars, and my savings account.Why should that be? I know a fellow, a truck driver, who also has such ablack mark against his name. Back thirty-some years ago, he had to drop aload in some urban inner-city area. While there, he saw some guy rip theCB radio out of his cab. So he grabbed a baseball bat out of the out ofthe storage bin under the sleeper, and accosted him with it. The guy, whohad the CB radio under his arm, tried to make a run for it, so he droppedthe bat and grabbed him. A couple of punches were exchanged, and he gothis radio back -- but by then the cops were upon them.
    To make a long story short, HE got charged with felony battery -- becausea "deadly weapon" (the bat, which never got used) was involved -- and hehad to go to court to face the music.
    And of course, when you and your mates agreed to use that tyre-iron ofyours to relieve some "*****" of some folding money so that you could goout and buy some beer, it wasn't conspiracy to commit a felony? LOL! No such agreement was ever made.
    Liar (see attached). But then again, everyone *knows* that about
    you, Ted.

    And had someone suggested doing something
    like this, I would have wanted no part of it.

    Courtesy: moemcal@mail.cswnet.com (Moe)


    Or to dig up an old post of your in your own words:
    *************************'
    http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...ic.rutgers.edu

    hwere he uses the word we in terms of the incident

    From: Theodore A. Kaldis (kaldis@topaz.rutgers.edu)
    Subject: Re: "Rolling *****s"
    View: Complete Thread (17 articles)
    Original Format
    Newsgroups: alt.flame, soc.singles, talk.politics.misc
    Date: 1990-02-16 16:48:04 PST


    In article <1990Feb16.063828.13266@agate.berkeley.edu>
    gsmith@garnet.berkeley.edu (Gene W. Smith) writes:
    Theodore A. Kaldis:
    a) This incident happened a very long time ago and should be properly viewed as a manifestation of youthful indiscretion.
    When you posted this story, I wondered if you were making it up to see what kind of reaction you would get.
    When I first posted this story, it was in response to the suggestion
    that I would be inclined to go "*** bashing". I originally intended
    to post a straightforward account about how a naive youth was cajoled
    by some miscreant acquaintances (the proverbial "bad company") to
    reluctantly accompany them on an expedition aimed at acquiring funds
    through a procedure that this youth considered to be of EXTREMELY
    dubious merit (to put it mildly), and that how this youth was
    EXCEPTIONALLY horrified at the events that subsequently transpired.

    But seeing as the sort of activity that occurred that evening has
    recently been defended as an expression of constitutionally protected
    freedom of speech, I decided to play a few games with the story.
    Unsurprisingly (and rightfully so), no one has come to my defense.
    Also unsurprisingly, I have since become a raving sociopath (due to,
    doubtless, the fact that I espouse a position that is absolutely at
    variance with the officially accepted politically correct view) -- on
    the basis of a rudimentary account that no one here has a
    comprehensive conception or understanding of.
    Since it looks like you really mean it, I can only say that you are apparently a borderline sociopath.
    Excuse me, a BORDERLINE sociopath. Declared to be so by Gene Ward
    Smith, an erstwhile sociopath in his own right of exemplary
    credentials, in an absolutely serious posting (I don't know if this is
    a USENET first, but it is certainly a first for me) posted to
    alt.flame (among other places). (It takes one to know one.)
    You brag to the net about your violent, antisocial proclivities, which is another sign of a borderline personality disorder.
    I brag about nothing. The account I posted was perhaps wry (it was
    meant to be, in order to reflect the nature of life), but it was by no
    means comprehensive. For the record, the only reasons these *ssholes
    wanted me along was because I had the car. Me and another individual
    managed to evade the police primarily for the reason that we were
    unarmed. (This is the guy I have lost track of -- a number of years
    subsequent to this incident. He too went straight and managed to stay
    out of trouble with the police for the years that I knew him.) The
    guy in jail and the guy who OD'd were the instigators, the active
    participants, and the ones who were apprehended by the police. The
    cops should have properly thrown their hind ends in jail, and I
    afterwards told them so to their face in essentially those words.
    It's the sort of thing rapists and muggers will sometimes do.
    Of which I am neither. As I said, I was absolutely horrified at what
    went on. Have you ever seen anyone get mugged? It's not a pretty
    sight. In order to effectively do it, one has to be an absolute, cold
    sadist. Part of the ritual is to make the victim squirm like a
    cornered rat. This is what Goetz was talking about in his confession
    tape to the New Hampshire police when he turned himself in, and it is
    this that caused him to become so enraged as to shoot his assailants.
    Anyone who has ever witnessed this knows what he's talking about. All
    you liberals who haven't are just blowing out your *ss.

    Moreover, I had to give the junkyard a buck to replace my tire iron,
    and these chumps never reimbursed me like they said they would.
    By the way, I thought you claimed that in your misspent youth you were a flower child?
    No, not a flower child. A long-hair anti-war demonstrator, yes; a
    "freak", yes; but never a "flower child".
    As a self-proclaimed Christian, you should instead feel shame and a desire to change, by the way.
    It should have been obvious that this incident occurred prior to my
    Christian days.
    --
    Theodore A. Kaldis | "Perhaps we
    may
    +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+- | frighten
    away
    email: kaldis@topaz.rutgers.edu | the ghost of
    so
    UUCP: {...}!rutgers!topaz.rutgers.edu!kaldis | many years
    ago
    U.S. Snail: P.O. Box #1212, Woodbridge, NJ 07095 | with a
    little
    ex-Ma Bell: (201) 283-4855 (voice) | illumination
    .. . ."

    *************************


  15. #15
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    Default Ted Kaldis: OCD Sufferer/Potential Stalker Misdemeanor in onestate is a felony in ano

    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    Ken Smith wrote:
    indigent wrote:
    After you've read a few of Ken's messages, you might better understand why the Examiners' Board were inclined to question his psychological fitness.
    And then again, you probably won't. Here is what one practicing
    mental health professional observed about Ted Kaldis (attached):



  16. #16
    Junior Member
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    Posts
    8

    Default Misdemeanor in one state is a felony in another

    Hello Dane,

    I read your other thread and I hope that you are cleared of that ridiculous
    injustice.
    You might consider seeking employent for lower wages than you are accustomed to
    No thank you. I am not interested in 5 or 10 bucks an hour. I do
    appreciate your response but compliance is not an option. Truth be known,
    about a month ago I informed my probation officer that I had destroyed my SS
    card as well as my birth cirtificate. I've been repeatedly told that I must
    obtain a state ID, attend AA meetings, etc. but I'm just not interested in
    any of that. My days of filling W2 forms and looking at tax forms are over.
    In my current state of mind, I'd go insane if I had to wake up early and go
    to work...I simply wouldn't be able to handle it.
    by showing that you are meeting at least some of your comminity service requirements.
    Those requirements are the last thing on my mind. Requirements have not and
    will not be met.
    Perhaps you can conceive a plan
    My only plan is to serve the sentence as quickly as possible and get this
    over with ASAP so that I can freely move around the U.S. without worry of
    further charges such as flight. I'm a kind and attentive good looking guy,
    and I figure that I can get married and live a happy life with someone.

    I had mentioned previously about a friend who had had enough and told his
    probation officer that he wanted to do time served. His PO was very
    cooperative and got him only 8 months in jail! I've asked my PO to
    recommend a light prison term but I can't get a straight answer and nothing
    gets done. I don't understand why the judge put me on probation if I never
    asked for it, but I must take the blame because I did not speak up during
    sentencing. Next thing I know, I had 10 freaking years of probation but I
    didn't know what was involved since I am not a criminal.

    Please, is there any way possible that I can obtain a public defender to
    initiate and assist me during the revocation proceedings? I'd like for
    someone to assist me so that I serve significantly less than the 7 1/2 years
    of probation left. I'd be very happy with current time served and a couple
    of years in prison.

    Respectfully,

    Indigent Guy



  17. #17
    Senior Member
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    Default Ken Smith's Apparent Psychosis

    Ken Smith wrote:
    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    After you've read a few of Ken's messages, you might better understand why the Examiners' Board were inclined to question his psychological fitness.
    And then again, you probably won't.
    Here is what one practicing mental health professional observed about Ted Kaldis
    If this isn't the fruit of Ken Smith's apparent psychosis, I don't know what
    is. Ken is apparently DEEPLY troubled every time I point out that he was
    asked to submit to a psychological examination by the Examiners' Board of the
    Colorado Bar Association. And so he had an internet friend of his show his
    wife (who is apparently a licenced psychologist) a selected portion of my
    internet postings. And of course she came to the preordained conclusion --
    IF any of this even happened in the first place -- Ken might just be making
    it all up, mendacious prevarciator that he is.

    So Ken pretends that this carries the same weight as does the fact that he
    was asked to submit to a psychological examination by the Examiners' Board of
    the Colorado Bar Association. As if he could somehow alleviate whatever
    problems there might be with his psychological well-being by showing someone
    else to be psychologically unbalanced.

    Ken, dude, get your head screwed on! Get help!
    (attached):
    [elided]
    --
    Theodore A. Kaldis
    kaldis@worldnet.att.net

  18. #18
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    Default Ted Kaldis: "Cam Brown Was Indicted; Therefore, He Is a MURDERER!!!"

    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    Ken Smith wrote:
    Theodore A. Kaldis wrote:
    After you've read a few of Ken's messages, you might better understand whythe Examiners' Board were inclined to question his psychological fitness.And then again, you probably won't.
    Here is what one practicing mental health professional observed about TedKaldis
    If this isn't the fruit of Ken Smith's apparent psychosis, I don't know what is.
    And as you are merely a glorified telephone repairman with no
    training whatsoever in the field, you couldn't recognize a bona fide
    psychosis if it hit you in the head with a tyre-iron. Lindsay can, and
    she called it as she saw it. Sucks for you.
    Ken is apparently DEEPLY troubled every time I point out that he was asked to submit to a psychological examination by the Examiners' Board of the Colorado Bar Association.
    It's not the raw fact itself but rather, the patently unfair manner
    in which you employ it. It is called "defamation by innuendo,"
    insinuating that the fact itself is proof of alleged mental infirmity.
    Most people would be rightly offended by defamatory comments, and most
    people would agree that the one aggrieved has a right to defend himself
    with vigor.

    What does the Bible say about one's right to his good name, and to
    not be slandered by others?
    And so he had an internet friend of his show his wife (who is apparently a licenced psychologist) a selected portion of my internet postings.
    What she *found* is evidence that you suffer from
    obsessive-compulsive disorder, and credible evidence that you might also
    be a stalker. After the thousandth reference to my battle with the Bar,
    sane folks would let it rest. Obsessed stalkers don't. Q.E.D.
    And of course she came to the preordained conclusion -- IF any of this even happened in the first place -- Ken might just be making it all up, mendacious prevarciator that he is.
    "Paranoia, the destroyer!"

    Let me get this straight, Ted: You are claiming that "Kent Wills" is
    really a Ken Smith sockpuppet -- created ten years ago so that he could
    beat Ted Kaldis in a debate that he had no reason to believe would ever
    occur in the first place?

    If you believe *THAT*, no wonder you believe that Jesus rose from the
    dead, and Cam Brown didn't kill his illegitimate four-year-old daughter
    in cold blood. You can believe anything, even in spite of the evidence
    -- which distinguishes me from brain-dead Christian believers, as I am
    unable to so thoroughly override my reason and logic circuits.
    So Ken pretends that this carries the same weight as does the fact that he was asked to submit to a psychological examination by the Examiners' Board of the Colorado Bar Association.
    In point of fact, it carries a lot more probative value. Just as the
    mere fact of an indictment does not prove that Cam Brown is a murderer,
    the mere accusation by a government official without colorable probable
    cause to support it (and more importantly, an ulterior motive for making
    it) proves nothing. Indeed, you have admitted this yourself.

    By contrast, Lindsay analyzed your posts, and from that evidence,
    quite reasonably deduced that *you* are suffering from an
    obsessive-compulsive disorder. So, which piece of evidence carries more
    probative value?

    Clearly, Lindsay's observations.
    As if he could somehow alleviate whatever problems there might be with his psychological well-being by showing someone else to be psychologically unbalanced.
    Ken has a professional opinion indicating that he has no significant
    mental infirmities and also, a profesional opinion stating that Ted most
    likely suffers from obsessive-compulsive disorder, and quite possibly is
    a stalker, to boot.


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