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Thread: title was forged and transfered, now what??

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    18

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    What is the name of your state?--- California

    I'm the owner of the title of cert,my car is paid off. My estranged
    son requested a copy of the title, forged my signature, got the title
    transfered to his name and have new title under his name issued to him
    on 5/9/04. According to DMV's records, they said that he did the title
    transfer thru AAA office. How did AAA do that???? I thought you can
    only do that thru DMV in person...

    I have been living out of the country and just found out about this.
    Because of my work, I won't be back to USA to take care this matter
    any time soon. I'd like to get the title back to mine or my
    daughter''s name (she is in USA) before my estranged son sell my car.

    What should I do now??? What is the best way to go about this? Can I
    power attorney or grant permission someone to take care this matter
    for me in USA??? Please help.....

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    619

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    Candy,

    The obvious question is who has the car. If the car is in your
    possession then have your daughter collect it and hide it where your son
    won't find it. Then get the title re-issued at your convenience. If your son
    has the car and the title you should probably look into the cost of having
    an attorney represent you. If your daughter lives near the car she might be
    able to do the running around necessary to locate an attorney. You can fax
    and mail an authorization to the attorney. If your son has the car and does
    not have your permission to use it you may report it as stolen but I'd
    advise against this.

    Good luck,
    Dave M.



  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,067

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    Give your daughter a power of attorney to handle it. She should
    demand the return of the car, in writing. The letter must contain
    no threats of action that will follow if it is not returned.
    Simply demand the return and stop. Naturally, the car won't be
    returned. After a few days, if the car is not returned, she
    should report it stolen and file an insurance claim. Let the
    insurance company and the cops do their thing. If the car is not
    returned and the insurance company won't pay, find out the
    insurance company's justification. If you don't agree that they
    have the right to deny the claim, sue them.

    McGyver

    "candy" <crazylove680@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:b89676a2.0406030019.6a17f59e@posting.google.c om...
    What is the name of your state?--- California I'm the owner of the title of cert,my car is paid off. My
    estranged
    son requested a copy of the title, forged my signature, got the
    title
    transfered to his name and have new title under his name issued
    to him
    on 5/9/04. According to DMV's records, they said that he did the
    title
    transfer thru AAA office. How did AAA do that???? I thought you
    can
    only do that thru DMV in person... I have been living out of the country and just found out about
    this.
    Because of my work, I won't be back to USA to take care this
    matter
    any time soon. I'd like to get the title back to mine or my daughter''s name (she is in USA) before my estranged son sell my
    car.
    What should I do now??? What is the best way to go about this?
    Can I
    power attorney or grant permission someone to take care this
    matter
    for me in USA??? Please help.....


  4. #4
    => Vox Populi
    Guest

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    candy wrote:
    What is the name of your state?--- California I'm the owner of the title of cert,my car is paid off. My estranged son requested a copy of the title, forged my signature, got the title transfered to his name and have new title under his name issued to him on 5/9/04. According to DMV's records, they said that he did the title transfer thru AAA office. How did AAA do that???? I thought you can only do that thru DMV in person... I have been living out of the country and just found out about this. Because of my work, I won't be back to USA to take care this matter any time soon. I'd like to get the title back to mine or my daughter''s name (she is in USA) before my estranged son sell my car. What should I do now??? What is the best way to go about this? Can I power attorney or grant permission someone to take care this matter for me in USA??? Please help.....
    You need to notify the Police and the local CA DMV of this immediately.
    They will instruct you on how to proceed.



    --
    "The most important thing is for us to find Osama bin Laden. It is our
    number one priority and we will not rest until we find him."
    ~ George Bush Jr. 2001-09-13

    "I don't know where he (bin Laden) is. I have no idea and I really
    don't care. It's not that important. It's not our priority."
    ~ George Bush Jr. 2002-03-13

    "I was not prepared to shoot my eardrum out with a shotgun in order to
    get a deferment. Not was I willing to go to Canada. So I chose to
    better myself by learning how to fly airplanes."
    ~George W. Bush on how he dodged the
    Vietnam draft---1994



  5. #5
    => Vox Populi
    Guest

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    McGyver wrote:
    Give your daughter a power of attorney to handle it. She should demand the return of the car, in writing. The letter must contain no threats of action that will follow if it is not returned. Simply demand the return and stop. Naturally, the car won't be returned. After a few days, if the car is not returned, she should report it stolen and file an insurance claim. Let the insurance company and the cops do their thing. If the car is not returned and the insurance company won't pay, find out the insurance company's justification. If you don't agree that they have the right to deny the claim, sue them.
    Typical lawyer response, a pattern of action likely to incur the highest
    legal fees with the least efficient results.

    Why no contact the Police / DA immediately, eh McG? Since the kid
    has already committed the crime of forgery, fraud and likely grand theft,
    let the DA, at the state's dime, do their thing now.

    An insurance company will almost certainly deny that claim (if the plaintiff
    even has comprehensive coverage), as the case involves many elements
    that are nearly universally excluded from coverage in standard insurance
    boilerplate, to wit: no forced breaking and entry, perp had knowing access
    to the keys by plaintiff, and perhaps allowed use of the vehicle, perp is a
    family member, plaintiff has delayed in reporting the loss, etc, etc.

    Hiring a lawyer to try and overcome a case that is already stacked to lose,
    in fact, contract and law is only something a lawyer would suggest.

    McGyver "candy" <crazylove680@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:b89676a2.0406030019.6a17f59e@posting.google.c om...
    What is the name of your state?--- California I'm the owner of the title of cert,my car is paid off. My estranged son requested a copy of the title, forged my signature, got the title transfered to his name and have new title under his name issued to him on 5/9/04. According to DMV's records, they said that he did the title transfer thru AAA office. How did AAA do that???? I thought you can only do that thru DMV in person... I have been living out of the country and just found out about this. Because of my work, I won't be back to USA to take care this matter any time soon. I'd like to get the title back to mine or my daughter''s name (she is in USA) before my estranged son sell my car. What should I do now??? What is the best way to go about this? Can I power attorney or grant permission someone to take care this matter for me in USA??? Please help.....
    --
    "The most important thing is for us to find Osama bin Laden. It is our
    number one priority and we will not rest until we find him."
    ~ George Bush Jr. 2001-09-13

    "I don't know where he (bin Laden) is. I have no idea and I really
    don't care. It's not that important. It's not our priority."
    ~ George Bush Jr. 2002-03-13

    "I was not prepared to shoot my eardrum out with a shotgun in order to
    get a deferment. Not was I willing to go to Canada. So I chose to
    better myself by learning how to fly airplanes."
    ~George W. Bush on how he dodged the
    Vietnam draft---1994



  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,067

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    "=> Vox Populi " <vox@popu.li> wrote in message
    news:_BGvc.14$UH3.26771@news.uswest.net...
    McGyver wrote:
    Give your daughter a power of attorney to handle it. She should demand the return of the car, in writing. The letter must contain no threats of action that will follow if it is not returned. Simply demand the return and stop. Naturally, the car won't be returned. After a few days, if the car is not returned, she should report it stolen and file an insurance claim. Let the insurance company and the cops do their thing. If the car is not returned and the insurance company won't pay, find out the insurance company's justification. If you don't agree that they have the right to deny the claim, sue them.
    Typical lawyer response, a pattern of action likely to incur the
    highest
    legal fees with the least efficient results. Why no contact the Police / DA immediately, eh McG? Since the kid has already committed the crime of forgery, fraud and likely grand
    theft,
    let the DA, at the state's dime, do their thing now.
    Nothing wrong with that idea. It might even get the car back. I
    prefer the insurance company approach first. Aside from the eventual
    litigation, which is unlikely and certainly optional, the insurance
    claim has no cost. The criminal complaint option has no cost either,
    but sometimes no good flows to the victim. The cops and DA sometimes
    decline to proceed. And the car might end up in Mexico and the thief
    bankrupt and in jail. But still, the criminal complaint is a good
    idea, and can be used at any time.

    I have seen the insurance claim idea work surprisingly well. One
    client sold a car, handed it over, took a promissory note, and the
    note was not paid. The buyer forged a transfer and became the legal
    owner on the DMV records as well as registered owner. The client
    filed an insurance claim on coverage dealing with stolen cars. The
    insurance company paid the claim. Whether the thief ends up in jail
    is not the client's first concern.
    An insurance company will almost certainly deny that claim (if the
    plaintiff
    even has comprehensive coverage), as the case involves many elements that are nearly universally excluded from coverage in standard
    insurance
    boilerplate, to wit: no forced breaking and entry, perp had knowing
    access
    to the keys by plaintiff, and perhaps allowed use of the vehicle,
    perp is a
    family member, plaintiff has delayed in reporting the loss, etc,
    etc.

    That's all possible. If the company has a valid reason for denying
    the claim, fine. A $.37 postage stamp was wasted.

    McGyver



  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    106

    Default title was forged and transfered, now what??

    "McGyver" <Greyprof@msn.com> wrote in message news:<2i9a99Fk3hc2U1@uni-berlin.de>...
    "=> Vox Populi " <vox@popu.li> wrote in message news:_BGvc.14$UH3.26771@news.uswest.net...
    McGyver wrote:
    Give your daughter a power of attorney to handle it. She should demand the return of the car, in writing. The letter must contain no threats of action that will follow if it is not returned. Simply demand the return and stop. Naturally, the car won't be returned. After a few days, if the car is not returned, she should report it stolen and file an insurance claim. Let the insurance company and the cops do their thing. If the car is not returned and the insurance company won't pay, find out the insurance company's justification. If you don't agree that they have the right to deny the claim, sue them.
    Typical lawyer response, a pattern of action likely to incur the
    highest
    legal fees with the least efficient results. Why no contact the Police / DA immediately, eh McG? Since the kid has already committed the crime of forgery, fraud and likely grand
    theft,
    let the DA, at the state's dime, do their thing now.
    Nothing wrong with that idea. It might even get the car back. I prefer the insurance company approach first. Aside from the eventual litigation, which is unlikely and certainly optional, the insurance claim has no cost. The criminal complaint option has no cost either, but sometimes no good flows to the victim. The cops and DA sometimes decline to proceed. And the car might end up in Mexico and the thief bankrupt and in jail. But still, the criminal complaint is a good idea, and can be used at any time. I have seen the insurance claim idea work surprisingly well. One client sold a car, handed it over, took a promissory note, and the note was not paid. The buyer forged a transfer and became the legal owner on the DMV records as well as registered owner. The client filed an insurance claim on coverage dealing with stolen cars. The insurance company paid the claim. Whether the thief ends up in jail is not the client's first concern.
    An insurance company will almost certainly deny that claim (if the
    plaintiff
    even has comprehensive coverage), as the case involves many elements that are nearly universally excluded from coverage in standard
    insurance
    boilerplate, to wit: no forced breaking and entry, perp had knowing
    access
    to the keys by plaintiff, and perhaps allowed use of the vehicle,
    perp is a
    family member, plaintiff has delayed in reporting the loss, etc,
    etc. That's all possible. If the company has a valid reason for denying the claim, fine. A $.37 postage stamp was wasted. McGyver
    As well as several days of valuable time. Your advice is good to
    follow after reporting it stolen, not before.

    Harry K

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