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  • Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

    More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is
    mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.

    http://www.redherring.com/Article.as...ipped%e2%80%99

    Katrina Corpses Get ‘Chipped’

    A company is implanting RFID tags in corpses in Mississippi to help
    identify the dead.
    September 16, 2005

    A company that makes ID chips for humans said Friday it has started
    “chipping” corpses in the Katrina-ravaged region of Mississippi to
    help expedite the identification process.

    Florida-based VeriChip said it has already implanted radio frequency
    identification (RFID) tags into 100 corpses in the state for the
    Mississippi State Department of Health.

    The company, which is a subsidiary of publicly traded Applied Digital
    Solutions, said it is also in talks with Louisiana health authorities,
    though no agreement has been reached.

    “These bodies are in an advanced stage of decomposition,” said John
    Procter, VeriChip’s director of communications. “Many of them have no
    identification marks, no wallets, no IDs. In some cases a toe tag is
    not even viable.”

    Mr. Procter said the procedure costs $200 to tag each corpse, though
    the company is providing the service for free.

    The death doll in the Gulf Coast from the storm has risen to more
    than 700.

    FDA-Approved

    Using RFID tags to ID corpses is the company’s latest move in the
    growing field of RFID, which is expected to one day replace barcode
    technology. The RFID market, which commonly tracks goods in a supply
    chain and streamlines factories, is estimated to become a
    multibillion-dollar industry over the next five years.

    Last October, the company received approval from the U.S. Food and
    Drug Administration for a rice-sized chip that’s implantable in
    humans. The company implants the device with a syringe under the skin
    of its customers.

    The chip can then be read by a reader enabling applications in fields
    that require location tracking and quick identification. The company
    sells its service to the security and health industries.

    For example, several Mexican government officials received the chip
    for security purposes to combat kidnapping attempts.

    In a healthcare setting, hospital staff could use a patient’s RFID
    chip to quickly pull up the patient’s information quickly, even if the
    patient were unable to communicate with the caregiver.

    Chipping Controversy

    But chipping people remains highly controversial.

    Critics say privacy concerns are a big issue because the radio signal
    emitted from the tag could be tracked by any unknown source. An
    implanted chip could potentially expose the wearer to anyone looking
    to use the information for harm, if the chip could unlock personal or
    medical information.

    Critics also point to the fact that millions of pets already have a
    similar system with implanted ID tags. As the critics see it,
    implanting chips in humans could lead to negative associations and
    might deter customers from getting chipped.

    If the past is any guide, it’s likely that tracking corpses will also
    raise ethical concerns. For instance, would the person consent to
    disclosure of personal information contained in the chip after the
    death?

    But the company is no stranger to high-profile public moves.

    On September 19, the company plans to publicly chip a “senior
    executive” of the investment bank Merriman Curhan Ford in downtown San
    Francisco.

    In July, the former head of the U.S. Department of Health and Human
    Services, Tommy Thompson, joined the company’s board to back the chip
    company and promote its health and security applications.

    Though Mr. Thompson has not been chipped yet, VeriChip said he is
    “trying to schedule the procedure between his travel and his other
    commitments.”

    VeriChip debuted its technology by chipping clubbers at a bar in
    Spain, enabling customers to use a bar tab by swiping their arms under
    an RFID reader.


  • #2
    Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.
    Uh... I don't think chipping dead bodies really is a privacy issue.
    They're not going to complain about their movement being tracked, will
    they?

    In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - it
    helps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig it
    out and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too many
    problems.

    Juergen Nieveler
    --
    The exercise will finish and you¢ll get back to garrison just after the
    wash rack closes.

    Comment


    • #3
      Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

      wacho
      "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
      news:[email protected]
      More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped. http://www.redherring.com/Article.as...ipped%e2%80%99 Katrina Corpses Get 'Chipped' A company is implanting RFID tags in corpses in Mississippi to help identify the dead. September 16, 2005 A company that makes ID chips for humans said Friday it has started "chipping" corpses in the Katrina-ravaged region of Mississippi to help expedite the identification process. Florida-based VeriChip said it has already implanted radio frequency identification (RFID) tags into 100 corpses in the state for the Mississippi State Department of Health. The company, which is a subsidiary of publicly traded Applied Digital Solutions, said it is also in talks with Louisiana health authorities, though no agreement has been reached. "These bodies are in an advanced stage of decomposition," said John Procter, VeriChip's director of communications. "Many of them have no identification marks, no wallets, no IDs. In some cases a toe tag is not even viable." Mr. Procter said the procedure costs $200 to tag each corpse, though the company is providing the service for free. The death doll in the Gulf Coast from the storm has risen to more than 700. FDA-Approved Using RFID tags to ID corpses is the company's latest move in the growing field of RFID, which is expected to one day replace barcode technology. The RFID market, which commonly tracks goods in a supply chain and streamlines factories, is estimated to become a multibillion-dollar industry over the next five years. Last October, the company received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a rice-sized chip that's implantable in humans. The company implants the device with a syringe under the skin of its customers. The chip can then be read by a reader enabling applications in fields that require location tracking and quick identification. The company sells its service to the security and health industries. For example, several Mexican government officials received the chip for security purposes to combat kidnapping attempts. In a healthcare setting, hospital staff could use a patient's RFID chip to quickly pull up the patient's information quickly, even if the patient were unable to communicate with the caregiver. Chipping Controversy But chipping people remains highly controversial. Critics say privacy concerns are a big issue because the radio signal emitted from the tag could be tracked by any unknown source. An implanted chip could potentially expose the wearer to anyone looking to use the information for harm, if the chip could unlock personal or medical information. Critics also point to the fact that millions of pets already have a similar system with implanted ID tags. As the critics see it, implanting chips in humans could lead to negative associations and might deter customers from getting chipped. If the past is any guide, it's likely that tracking corpses will also raise ethical concerns. For instance, would the person consent to disclosure of personal information contained in the chip after the death? But the company is no stranger to high-profile public moves. On September 19, the company plans to publicly chip a "senior executive" of the investment bank Merriman Curhan Ford in downtown San Francisco. In July, the former head of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Tommy Thompson, joined the company's board to back the chip company and promote its health and security applications. Though Mr. Thompson has not been chipped yet, VeriChip said he is "trying to schedule the procedure between his travel and his other commitments." VeriChip debuted its technology by chipping clubbers at a bar in Spain, enabling customers to use a bar tab by swiping their arms under an RFID reader.

      Comment


      • #4
        Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

        -----BEGIN TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----
        Message-type: plaintext

        In <[email protected]> Juergen Nieveler <[email protected]> wrote:
        Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
        More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.
        Uh... I don't think chipping dead bodies really is a privacy issue.They're not going to complain about their movement being tracked, willthey?In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - ithelps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig itout and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too manyproblems.
        That is exactly the danger of this. it seems like such a good idea. make it
        one little bit more acceptable. that's the problem with RFID's, there's so
        **** many things that they can be used for that are such helpfull, "good" ideas
        that sooner or later they'll be so accepted that getting a chip implanted will
        become mandatory... and if you should refuse because you believe it's a potential
        violation of your privacy, then your life will be immediately forfeit.

        -----END TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----

        Comment


        • #5
          Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

          [email protected] wrote:
          In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - ithelps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig itout and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too manyproblems. That is exactly the danger of this. it seems like such a good idea. make it one little bit more acceptable. that's the problem with RFID's, there's so **** many things that they can be used for that are such helpfull, "good" ideas that sooner or later they'll be so accepted that getting a chip implanted will become mandatory... and if you should refuse because you believe it's a potential violation of your privacy, then your life will be immediately forfeit.
          Even mandatory chipping of dead bodies isn't a privacy risk.

          Let's face it, when it comes to making people accept RFID chipping, the
          main problem isn't corpses, it's those braindead people who accept
          chipping "to increase security", "to get through airport controls
          faster" or "to get VIP treatment at Club XY".

          Juergen Nieveler
          --
          Don't use a big word where a diminutive one will suffice

          Comment


          • #6
            Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

            >A company that makes ID chips for humans said Friday it has started
            “chipping” corpses in the Katrina-ravaged region of Mississippi tohelp expedite the identification process.
            Why does this expedite the identification process more than just
            putting (paper) tags on the body bags? I hope the idea here isn't
            that you can scan the bodies for ID *after they are buried*. (If
            you need to do that, why bury them?) And I hope the idea isn't
            that they send someone out to search a whole warehouse to find the
            corpse with a particular ID number.
            Florida-based VeriChip said it has already implanted radio frequencyidentification (RFID) tags into 100 corpses in the state for theMississippi State Department of Health.
            The company, which is a subsidiary of publicly traded Applied DigitalSolutions, said it is also in talks with Louisiana health authorities,though no agreement has been reached. “These bodies are in an advanced stage of decomposition,” said JohnProcter, VeriChip’s director of communications. “Many of them have noidentification marks, no wallets, no IDs. In some cases a toe tag isnot even viable.”
            Then how do you keep pieces of one corpse with other pieces of the same
            corpse, assuming you can even figure out what goes with what? Don't
            they put them in body bags?
            Mr. Procter said the procedure costs $200 to tag each corpse, thoughthe company is providing the service for free.
            $200? Why? I bet Wal-mart could do it for under 25 cents each.
            And for it to be a viable technology for them to use in their supply
            chains, it's more likely to be under 1 cent each. It's not like
            the chips have to be encased in something sanitary and body-friendly
            so as not to cause problems for LIVING people.
            The death doll in the Gulf Coast from the storm has risen to morethan 700. FDA-ApprovedUsing RFID tags to ID corpses is the company’s latest move in thegrowing field of RFID, which is expected to one day replace barcodetechnology. The RFID market, which commonly tracks goods in a supplychain and streamlines factories, is estimated to become amultibillion-dollar industry over the next five years.
            This may be needed when fast-food chains need large supplies of
            corpses for McSolyent McGreen, but I just don't see shipping corpses
            all over being so common that identifying them quickly is such
            a big deal.
            Last October, the company received approval from the U.S. Food andDrug Administration for a rice-sized chip that’s implantable inhumans. The company implants the device with a syringe under the skinof its customers. The chip can then be read by a reader enabling applications in fieldsthat require location tracking and quick identification. The companysells its service to the security and health industries. For example, several Mexican government officials received the chipfor security purposes to combat kidnapping attempts. In a healthcare setting, hospital staff could use a patient’s RFIDchip to quickly pull up the patient’s information quickly, even if thepatient were unable to communicate with the caregiver.
            It's my understanding that the RFID chip itself contains essentially
            a serial number, and nothing else (or at least the CHEAP kind has
            no re-writable storage). It's a key to your medical or whatever
            record in some computer somewhere (like your SSN or driver's license
            number is now). Among other things, that means you don't have to
            keep getting your chip updated every time your medical record
            changes. If the computer in question gets wiped out by some disaster
            like a hurricane or a nuke, the RFID tag is useless. It also means
            that the Feds can probably subpoena info from the computer, chip
            or no chip.
            Chipping ControversyBut chipping people remains highly controversial. Critics say privacy concerns are a big issue because the radio signalemitted from the tag could be tracked by any unknown source. Animplanted chip could potentially expose the wearer to anyone lookingto use the information for harm, if the chip could unlock personal ormedical information.
            If the chip does not *CONTAIN* personal or medical information, but
            it's in a computer somewhere, then worry about who has access to
            the computer, which is an issue even if the chip is with the person
            in a mountain cabin with no one for miles around and plenty of ammo
            to keep it that way. Just knowledge of the RFID serial number is
            unlikely to be the only way to get at the info (it can probably be
            looked up by name, SSN, or all sorts of other ways).
            Critics also point to the fact that millions of pets already have asimilar system with implanted ID tags. As the critics see it,implanting chips in humans could lead to negative associations andmight deter customers from getting chipped.
            If the past is any guide, it’s likely that tracking corpses will alsoraise ethical concerns. For instance, would the person consent todisclosure of personal information contained in the chip after thedeath?
            *IS* there any personal information *contained in the chip*,
            especially if the chip is implanted *IN ORDER TO ASSIST IDENTIFICATION*,
            which means they have no identification yet.
            VeriChip debuted its technology by chipping clubbers at a bar inSpain, enabling customers to use a bar tab by swiping their arms underan RFID reader.
            It is interesting that if RFID becomes standardized and widespread
            enough, someone can use it without having to issue any RFID chips
            at all. They just use what the customer already has, assuming the
            serial numbers are unique. I could, for example, use the RFID chip
            in the wallet I got at Walmart as my employee access badge, my car
            keys, and my home security system. Someone else might use the chip
            in their arm. I'd just have to register it with each of these
            systems and remember to de-register it should I ever change wallets
            or arms.

            Gordon L. Burditt

            Comment


            • #7
              Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public


              "Juergen Nieveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
              news:[email protected] ..
              Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
              More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.
              Uh... I don't think chipping dead bodies really is a privacy issue. They're not going to complain about their movement being tracked, will they? In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - it helps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig it out and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too many problems.
              yes but I agree with the OP that this is the thin end of a very big wedge.
              Chipping dead bodies and chipping pets is a small first step towards the
              larger goal of chipping people enmasse. Chipping dead bodies has more to do
              with benefits for the company doing it than it does for the bodies receiving
              the chip = the company gets to practice it's skill, and it gets a load of
              free bodies upon which to conduct it's research and development. There's a
              smokescreen here and we would do well to look behind it at what is really
              going on.
              I don't see how chipping has any advantage over a toe tag with a number on
              it. The number would correspond to an entry in a database on a simple PC, an
              entry that would contain all the info abou the person.
              No, I'm very suspicious of this chipping lark.


              Comment


              • #8
                Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                -----BEGIN TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----
                Message-type: plaintext

                In <[email protected]> Juergen Nieveler <[email protected]> wrote:
                [email protected] wrote:
                In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - ithelps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig itout and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too manyproblems. That is exactly the danger of this. it seems like such a good idea. make it one little bit more acceptable. that's the problem with RFID's, there's so **** many things that they can be used for that are such helpfull, "good" ideas that sooner or later they'll be so accepted that getting a chip implanted will become mandatory... and if you should refuse because you believe it's a potential violation of your privacy, then your life will be immediately forfeit.
                Even mandatory chipping of dead bodies isn't a privacy risk.
                No, it isn't, but is IS a bad precedent that takes RFID one step closer to
                being accecpted by "the masses".
                Let's face it, when it comes to making people accept RFID chipping, themain problem isn't corpses, it's those braindead people who acceptchipping "to increase security", "to get through airport controlsfaster" or "to get VIP treatment at Club XY".
                I dissagree. ANY acceptance of RFID technology is a bad thing, period.

                When someone invents a means to jam or nutralize RFID chips and readers, I will
                use any means I can to help spread the use of it to destroy and / or render
                useless as many of those ****able things as possible.


                -----END TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----




                Comment


                • #9
                  Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                  This is a Type III anonymous message, sent to you by the Mixminion
                  server at mercurio.mixmaster.it. If you do not want to receive
                  anonymous messages, please contact [email protected]

                  -----BEGIN TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----
                  Message-type: plaintext

                  In <[email protected]> [email protected] (Gordon Burditt) wrote:
                  A company that makes ID chips for humans said Friday it has started“chipping” corpses in the Katrina-ravaged region of Mississippi to helpexpedite the identification process.Why does this expedite the identification process more than justputting (paper) tags on the body bags? I hope the idea here isn'tthat you can scan the bodies for ID *after they are buried*. (Ifyou need to do that, why bury them?) And I hope the idea isn'tthat they send someone out to search a whole warehouse to find thecorpse with a particular ID number.
                  Florida-based VeriChip said it has already implanted radio frequencyidentification (RFID) tags into 100 corpses in the state for theMississippi State Department of Health.The company, which is a subsidiary of publicly traded Applied DigitalSolutions, said it is also in talks with Louisiana health authorities,though no agreement has been reached. “These bodies are in an advanced stage of decomposition,” said JohnProcter, VeriChip’s director of communications. “Many of them have noidentification marks, no wallets, no IDs. In some cases a toe tag isnot even viable.”
                  Then how do you keep pieces of one corpse with other pieces of the samecorpse, assuming you can even figure out what goes with what? Don'tthey put them in body bags?
                  Mr. Procter said the procedure costs $200 to tag each corpse, though the company is providing the service for free.
                  $200? Why? I bet Wal-mart could do it for under 25 cents each.And for it to be a viable technology for them to use in their supplychains, it's more likely to be under 1 cent each. It's not likethe chips have to be encased in something sanitary and body-friendlyso as not to cause problems for LIVING people.
                  The death doll in the Gulf Coast from the storm has risen to morethan 700. FDA-ApprovedUsing RFID tags to ID corpses is the company’s latest move in thegrowing field of RFID, which is expected to one day replace barcodetechnology. The RFID market, which commonly tracks goods in a supplychain and streamlines factories, is estimated to become amultibillion-dollar industry over the next five years.
                  This may be needed when fast-food chains need large supplies ofcorpses for McSolyent McGreen, but I just don't see shipping corpsesall over being so common that identifying them quickly is sucha big deal.
                  Last October, the company received approval from the U.S. Food andDrug Administration for a rice-sized chip that’s implantable inhumans. The company implants the device with a syringe under the skinof its customers. The chip can then be read by a reader enabling applications in fieldsthat require location tracking and quick identification. The companysells its service to the security and health industries. For example, several Mexican government officials received the chipfor security purposes to combat kidnapping attempts. In a healthcare setting, hospital staff could use a patient’s RFIDchip to quickly pull up the patient’s information quickly, even if thepatient were unable to communicate with the caregiver.
                  It's my understanding that the RFID chip itself contains essentiallya serial number, and nothing else (or at least the CHEAP kind hasno re-writable storage). It's a key to your medical or whateverrecord in some computer somewhere (like your SSN or driver's licensenumber is now). Among other things, that means you don't have tokeep getting your chip updated every time your medical recordchanges. If the computer in question gets wiped out by some disasterlike a hurricane or a nuke, the RFID tag is useless. It also meansthat the Feds can probably subpoena info from the computer, chipor no chip.
                  This is why research is being done to invent a means to render the chip incabable
                  of reflecting the radio signal sent by the chip reader. When it is developed,
                  I suggest we all get the nutralizer device and take up nuking RFIDs as a hobby.

                  Chipping ControversyBut chipping people remains highly controversial. Critics say privacy concerns are a big issue because the radio signalemitted from the tag could be tracked by any unknown source. Animplanted chip could potentially expose the wearer to anyone lookingto use the information for harm, if the chip could unlock personal ormedical information.If the chip does not *CONTAIN* personal or medical information, butit's in a computer somewhere, then worry about who has access tothe computer, which is an issue even if the chip is with the personin a mountain cabin with no one for miles around and plenty of ammoto keep it that way. Just knowledge of the RFID serial number isunlikely to be the only way to get at the info (it can probably belooked up by name, SSN, or all sorts of other ways).

                  The important thing is to render the chip unable to respond to chip readers.

                  Critics also point to the fact that millions of pets already have asimilar system with implanted ID tags. As the critics see it,implanting chips in humans could lead to negative associations andmight deter customers from getting chipped.
                  If the past is any guide, it’s likely that tracking corpses will alsoraise ethical concerns. For instance, would the person consent todisclosure of personal information contained in the chip after thedeath?
                  *IS* there any personal information *contained in the chip*,especially if the chip is implanted *IN ORDER TO ASSIST IDENTIFICATION*,which means they have no identification yet.
                  VeriChip debuted its technology by chipping clubbers at a bar inSpain, enabling customers to use a bar tab by swiping their arms underan RFID reader.
                  It is interesting that if RFID becomes standardized and widespreadenough, someone can use it without having to issue any RFID chipsat all. They just use what the customer already has, assuming theserial numbers are unique. I could, for example, use the RFID chipin the wallet I got at Walmart as my employee access badge, my carkeys, and my home security system. Someone else might use the chipin their arm. I'd just have to register it with each of thesesystems and remember to de-register it should I ever change walletsor arms.
                  And if you refuse to have anything to do with RFID technology in any way,
                  shape or form, then what?


                  -----END TYPE III ANONYMOUS MESSAGE-----


































































































                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                    In article <[email protected]>,
                    Juergen Nieveler <[email protected]> wrote:
                    [email protected] wrote:
                    In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - ithelps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig itout and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too manyproblems. That is exactly the danger of this. it seems like such a good idea. make it one little bit more acceptable. that's the problem with RFID's, there's so **** many things that they can be used for that are such helpfull, "good" ideas that sooner or later they'll be so accepted that getting a chip implanted will become mandatory... and if you should refuse because you believe it's a potential violation of your privacy, then your life will be immediately forfeit.
                    Even mandatory chipping of dead bodies isn't a privacy risk. Let's face it, when it comes to making people accept RFID chipping, the main problem isn't corpses, it's those braindead people who accept chipping "to increase security", "to get through airport controls faster" or "to get VIP treatment at Club XY".
                    The spoonful of sugar that makes the medicine go down easy?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                      On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 00:01:39 -0500 (CDT), [email protected] wrote:
                      I dissagree. ANY acceptance of RFID technology is a bad thing, period.
                      O, c'mon, RFID has a definitive role in industrial society. Being a barcode
                      guy myself, RFID slims my marketplace but it does so since it represents a
                      better solution in some circumstances.

                      Let's not shoot the rabbit ti kill the tapeworm.
                      --
                      Drop the alphabet for email

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of theGeneral Public

                        Andy wrote:
                        More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.
                        Nah, testing.

                        Corpses are messy and very biologically active.

                        Implant a few hundred chips as digital toetags, then recover them at the
                        end of the process. After weeks, months, years in body storage, you put
                        the chips under an electron microscope looking for failure modes.

                        ....Brock.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                          In Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the
                          General Public on Mon, 19 Sep 2005 15:39:57 -0500, by Andy, we
                          read:
                          More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it ismandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.http://www.redherring.com/Article.as...ipped%e2%80%99Katrina Corpses Get ‘Chipped’A company is implanting RFID tags in corpses in Mississippi to helpidentify the dead.September 16, 2005A company that makes ID chips for humans said Friday it has started“chipping” corpses in the Katrina-ravaged region of Mississippi tohelp expedite the identification process.
                          Right. A "toe tag" is just too much trouble.

                          Florida-based VeriChip said it has already implanted radio frequencyidentification (RFID) tags into 100 corpses in the state for theMississippi State Department of Health.The company, which is a subsidiary of publicly traded Applied DigitalSolutions, said it is also in talks with Louisiana health authorities,though no agreement has been reached. “These bodies are in an advanced stage of decomposition,” said JohnProcter, VeriChip’s director of communications. “Many of them have noidentification marks, no wallets, no IDs. In some cases a toe tag isnot even viable.” Mr. Procter said the procedure costs $200 to tag each corpse, thoughthe company is providing the service for free.
                          $200? A "toe tag" might cost 25 cents.

                          Yep, chips are the way to go.

                          The death doll in the Gulf Coast from the storm has risen to morethan 700. FDA-ApprovedUsing RFID tags to ID corpses is the company’s latest move in thegrowing field of RFID, which is expected to one day replace barcodetechnology. The RFID market, which commonly tracks goods in a supplychain and streamlines factories, is estimated to become amultibillion-dollar industry over the next five years.
                          Plus, these chips can be used in the next election. The
                          dead can now vote forever.

                          Last October, the company received approval from the U.S. Food andDrug Administration for a rice-sized chip that’s implantable inhumans. The company implants the device with a syringe under the skinof its customers. The chip can then be read by a reader enabling applications in fieldsthat require location tracking and quick identification. The companysells its service to the security and health industries.
                          Sure. Officials can then move the masses into holding
                          camps in a third the time.


                          For example, several Mexican government officials received the chipfor security purposes to combat kidnapping attempts.
                          Great kidnapping preventers. Those chips pack a hell of a punch.

                          In a healthcare setting, hospital staff could use a patient’s RFIDchip to quickly pull up the patient’s information quickly, even if thepatient were unable to communicate with the caregiver. Chipping ControversyBut chipping people remains highly controversial. Critics say privacy concerns are a big issue because the radio signalemitted from the tag could be tracked by any unknown source. Animplanted chip could potentially expose the wearer to anyone lookingto use the information for harm, if the chip could unlock personal ormedical information.
                          "Critics say?" What about "knowledgable people say?"

                          Free advertising and propaganda provided by reporters.

                          Critics also point to the fact that millions of pets already have asimilar system with implanted ID tags. As the critics see it,implanting chips in humans could lead to negative associations andmight deter customers from getting chipped. If the past is any guide, it’s likely that tracking corpses will alsoraise ethical concerns. For instance, would the person consent todisclosure of personal information contained in the chip after thedeath? But the company is no stranger to high-profile public moves. On September 19, the company plans to publicly chip a “seniorexecutive” of the investment bank Merriman Curhan Ford in downtown SanFrancisco. In July, the former head of the U.S. Department of Health and HumanServices, Tommy Thompson, joined the company’s board to back the chipcompany and promote its health and security applications. Though Mr. Thompson has not been chipped yet, VeriChip said he is“trying to schedule the procedure between his travel and his othercommitments.” VeriChip debuted its technology by chipping clubbers at a bar inSpain, enabling customers to use a bar tab by swiping their arms underan RFID reader.
                          Remove this chip just as you would a splinter.



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                          • #14
                            Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                            In Re: Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of
                            the General Public on 19 Sep 2005 20:52:25 GMT, by Juergen
                            Nieveler, we read:
                            Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
                            More conditioning of the general public to accept it when it is mandatory that all people must submit to being chipped.
                            Uh... I don't think chipping dead bodies really is a privacy issue.They're not going to complain about their movement being tracked, willthey?
                            Just scan the graveyard for all the information one
                            needs to rig the next election.

                            In this case I think chipping is understandable and a good idea - ithelps finding the dead body that belongs to the DNA sample to dig itout and hand it back to the mourning relatives without too manyproblems.
                            So would a pencil and paper.

                            Electronic identification is never a good idea.

                            Juergen Nieveler

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                            • #15
                              Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of the General Public

                              In Re: Katrina Corpses Get RFID Chipped - More Conditioning of
                              the General Public on Wed, 21 Sep 2005 08:40:01 -0400, by Ari
                              Silversteinn, we read:
                              On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 00:01:39 -0500 (CDT), [email protected] wrote:
                              I dissagree. ANY acceptance of RFID technology is a bad thing, period.
                              O, c'mon, RFID has a definitive role in industrial society. Being a barcodeguy myself, RFID slims my marketplace but it does so since it represents abetter solution in some circumstances.Let's not shoot the rabbit ti kill the tapeworm.
                              A strange analogy.

                              Corporations use government to expand markets, and
                              when dealing with government, to allow an inch is
                              to guarantee a mile.

                              Oh yes, just like electronic voting, RFIDs will
                              become increasingly mandatory. As it does, privacy and
                              freedom will diminish.


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