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MA Corporation employee in NH Nevada New Hampshire

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  • MA Corporation employee in NH Nevada New Hampshire

    We are a home-based MA Corporation that hired an IT person from NH. He works from home. Just registered him with unemployment in NH. Do we need to register our business in NH? Will we pay Corporate Taxes in NH? DOR NH said no tax liability and no annual report because we don't conduct business in NH (just have employee), but Secretary of State NH said we need to register business. Looking for concrete answer...

  • #2
    I am at least 15 years out of date on this, but it seems to me that we had to register in every state where we had a presence, back in the day when we had tech contractors moving from state to state and new client to new client. We had computer techs working on the Y2K project - every time we got a new client in a new state we had to register with that state.

    Do not go by me. Wait for someone who's more current. But that's how I remember it.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Thanks,

      If you had employees in a State without clients did you still register in that State?

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      • #4
        We wouldn't send an employee to that state unless we had a client there. These were situations where the employee was working at the client site day in and day out for anywhere between six months and two years. As an example, we'd get a new client in Oregon, and we'd have someone working in GA who was just finishing up an account, so we'd transfer them from GA to OR. We'd then register in OR. When the OR account was complete, we'd send them to the next client. Since the work all had to be done on the client site, we had a core of employees who were open to frequent relocation. Employees who couldn't relocate for family or other reasons would be assigned to those accounts that could be handled remotely, but in those cases we'd have them working out of the corporate office in MA. We wouldn't hire someone to work out of a state other than MA unless we had a client in that state.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          We don't have any clients in NH, just and employee and he works from home because we don't have a corporate office. He is completely able to do his job remotely. To register in NH we need a NH address which we really don't have - I would have to use the employee's address.

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          • #6
            If no one on this forum knows for sure, maybe you could run it by a busi. law attorney.
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

            Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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            • #7
              Short answer. Call NH Secretary of State and ask them.

              Longer answer. Each state has different rules and NH is not my state. You must sign up as an employer and handle NH-SUTA (there is no NH-SIT). I was on the NH-SS website for a while and could not find an answer to this question.
              "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
              Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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              • #8
                Per 1st post OP noted did call NH Sec. of State. (do need to register) I would "assume" their answer would be correct - OP wanted to verify due to other info given elsewhere I guess.
                Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If OP wants, OP could verify with a busi. law attorney in that state - don't know what else to tell OP. (if 2nd opinion wanted)
                  Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                  Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                  Comment

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