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Eviction question Nevada

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  • Eviction question Nevada

    Back in 2010, I was roommates with a woman who ended up moving out and did not let the landlords know, even though she knew for a month that she was leaving. Long story short, when I went to go add another roommate after she left, I couldn't, because she also had to be there to make changes, and she had changed her number and I had no idea how to contact her. I had paid up half of the rent but since I couldn't afford it, I moved out two weeks after she had left. My question is, I believe she was evicted because I got a weird message from her later, but I don't recall going through any eviction process (probably because I had kept in contact with the landlords and moved out as soon as I could, knowing I couldn't pay the rent or get a roommate). The amount owed ended up on my credit report. However, what I want to know is, how can I find out if I had actually been evicted or not? Would I have had been served eviction papers? The landlords had let me know when I should have been out, but they never bothered me about it. It's resurfacing now because I am apartment hunting. If anyone can give me an idea of how I can look this up, I would really appreciate it!

  • #2
    If the landlord pursued an eviction proceeding against you, there would be a record of it in whatever court oversees evictions in the jurisdiction where this took place. It's more likely, however, that the landlord simply reported the amount of outstanding rent to a credit-reporting agency. If you and your roommate were both on the lease, the landlord could go after either one of you for it, regardless of whatever arrangement the two of you had to split the rent every month. If you left with any rent owing (i.e., the last month or two), the landlord could also report that to a credit-reporting agency. If it's showing on your credit report, you have rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act to dispute any adverse material on your credit report. I'd suggest boning up on FCRA and pursuing that angle.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

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