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  • #16
    Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

    Hi Debs: If you are truly organized like you say you are AND you are somewhat of a packrat, you will have everything you need for an adjustment interview.
    I have saved and filed EVERYTHING since day 1 as I am a real sap too! I
    have all his letters, emails, our MSN conversations{don't want them to
    read those! LOL} etc, hundreds and hundreds of pages. So we should be
    all set. I was just checking to see if there was anything out od the
    ordinary that I should save or have ready. I have 2 file boxes filled
    with stuff already. All very neatly organized so it sounds like I
    should just bring them.
    Now to hear from them as to when! Thanks everyone.
    Debs

    --
    Posted via http://britishexpats.com

    Comment


    • #17
      Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

      Hi Debs: If you are truly organized like you say you are AND you are somewhat of a packrat, you will have everything you need for an adjustment interview.
      I have saved and filed EVERYTHING since day 1 as I am a real sap too! I
      have all his letters, emails, our MSN conversations{don't want them to
      read those! LOL} etc, hundreds and hundreds of pages. So we should be
      all set. I was just checking to see if there was anything out od the
      ordinary that I should save or have ready. I have 2 file boxes filled
      with stuff already. All very neatly organized so it sounds like I
      should just bring them.
      Now to hear from them as to when! Thanks everyone.
      Debs

      --
      Posted via http://britishexpats.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

        Hi: On the birth certificate situation, the "null and void" phrase was incorrect. However, it is not uncommon for non-lawyer immigration officers to mis-use legal terms of art. That cerficate was perfectly valid, just not "sufficient" to prove US birth for CIS purposes. BTW, did "J" ever obtain a US passport? If so, THAT would have been sufficient to prove US citizenship. [My dad's birth was recorded in 1921, but his name was hand written in Grandpa's native language and misspelled at that. It was of no import and he went through life just fine until he went to obtain a passport in the early 1970's]. I had a case once where we had to prove the birth of grandpa in North Dakota in 1870 in order to establish the US citizenship of the petitioning father wh had been born in Canada in 1918. Slight problem -- North Dakota did not record births until 1876. How did we do it to satisfaction of INS [in Pheonix BTW]? First, we showed official publications re non-availabilty of pre-1876 birth certificate. The we presented certified copy of 1896 marriage certificate from North Dakota records stated that groom was born in 1870 in North Dakota. Also, Canadian birth certidates of petitioner and his two brothers from offical Canadian records from 1910 to 1918 which stated father father's age and that he was US born. Finally, the petitioner's 1946 Canadian marriage certficate noted that the father of the groom was US born.
        *J* never did get a passport, otherwise it would have been so easy for
        us and we could have filed a lot earlier than we did. Even though this
        was a long process, I am glad that things ended out the way they did,
        when they did(his mother still being alive). He is now registered as
        being born here in NC.
        Before he got registered, he used to say,"Seems that my wife has more
        status in this country than I do"!! LOL

        --
        Posted via http://britishexpats.com

        Comment


        • #19
          Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

          Hi: On the birth certificate situation, the "null and void" phrase was incorrect. However, it is not uncommon for non-lawyer immigration officers to mis-use legal terms of art. That cerficate was perfectly valid, just not "sufficient" to prove US birth for CIS purposes. BTW, did "J" ever obtain a US passport? If so, THAT would have been sufficient to prove US citizenship. [My dad's birth was recorded in 1921, but his name was hand written in Grandpa's native language and misspelled at that. It was of no import and he went through life just fine until he went to obtain a passport in the early 1970's]. I had a case once where we had to prove the birth of grandpa in North Dakota in 1870 in order to establish the US citizenship of the petitioning father wh had been born in Canada in 1918. Slight problem -- North Dakota did not record births until 1876. How did we do it to satisfaction of INS [in Pheonix BTW]? First, we showed official publications re non-availabilty of pre-1876 birth certificate. The we presented certified copy of 1896 marriage certificate from North Dakota records stated that groom was born in 1870 in North Dakota. Also, Canadian birth certidates of petitioner and his two brothers from offical Canadian records from 1910 to 1918 which stated father father's age and that he was US born. Finally, the petitioner's 1946 Canadian marriage certficate noted that the father of the groom was US born.
          *J* never did get a passport, otherwise it would have been so easy for
          us and we could have filed a lot earlier than we did. Even though this
          was a long process, I am glad that things ended out the way they did,
          when they did(his mother still being alive). He is now registered as
          being born here in NC.
          Before he got registered, he used to say,"Seems that my wife has more
          status in this country than I do"!! LOL

          --
          Posted via http://britishexpats.com

          Comment


          • #20
            Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

            You're welcome, Debs..... Since you read our interview account, you know that we carried two plastic handled tub type things to the interview---one with originals in folders divided by category, and one with the copies of everything in tub one! Since you read our account, you also know that one of the first questions out of DAO Maher's mouth was, "****WHY**** is this file so ***THICK***????" To which we answered, of course, "we're very thorough". On hindsight, in our effort to be so completely prepared, perhaps it looked a bit out of the ordinary to Ms. Maher of Chicago. On hindsight, I truly believe that if our file *hadn't* been quite so thick (due to our methodical, organized, anal, and packrat nature....), we wouldn't have been barraged with accusations of a prior filing, an arrest record, a waiver, an amnesty filing, etc. etc. etc. Who knows. All I can say is, that in hindsight, I'd probably do it EXACTLY the way we did it. Because that's just the way I am. (Notice I said "I", not "we".... ) A tip: give Garry the heavier case to carry. ~SecretGarden
            I can certainly RELATE the this.....must be a man thing to not be a
            packrat or organized like us! Or a UK thing? nah...on second
            thought...just a man thing. LOL And yes, he'll be carrying BOTH of
            them!

            Debs

            --
            Posted via http://britishexpats.com

            Comment


            • #21
              Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

              You're welcome, Debs..... Since you read our interview account, you know that we carried two plastic handled tub type things to the interview---one with originals in folders divided by category, and one with the copies of everything in tub one! Since you read our account, you also know that one of the first questions out of DAO Maher's mouth was, "****WHY**** is this file so ***THICK***????" To which we answered, of course, "we're very thorough". On hindsight, in our effort to be so completely prepared, perhaps it looked a bit out of the ordinary to Ms. Maher of Chicago. On hindsight, I truly believe that if our file *hadn't* been quite so thick (due to our methodical, organized, anal, and packrat nature....), we wouldn't have been barraged with accusations of a prior filing, an arrest record, a waiver, an amnesty filing, etc. etc. etc. Who knows. All I can say is, that in hindsight, I'd probably do it EXACTLY the way we did it. Because that's just the way I am. (Notice I said "I", not "we".... ) A tip: give Garry the heavier case to carry. ~SecretGarden
              I can certainly RELATE the this.....must be a man thing to not be a
              packrat or organized like us! Or a UK thing? nah...on second
              thought...just a man thing. LOL And yes, he'll be carrying BOTH of
              them!

              Debs

              --
              Posted via http://britishexpats.com

              Comment


              • #22
                Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

                So me being the anal managerial type and always being a few steps ahead of the game {comes from being in my job for WAY TOO LONG} I am starting to think ahead about what to get ready for the Interview. I know that everyone gets their own "list" but was wondering what everyone else has experienced. As you know we are a VWP marraige so if there's anyone out there that can relate to this, maybe you can let me know what was required. Thanks to Secret Garden's Interview Experience Post I found out about the kids birth records etc. and already have them! Thanks SG! So please, if you will post what was asked of all of you to bring to the Interview, I will start getting everything together. My lawyer laughs at me being so organized. {he says I am a riot!} Guess all these years of management has paid off in a way I never planned on! Thanks in advance. Debs
                Here is what we posted on the Kamya AOS Interview site:

                Field Office: Norfolk, Virginia - 5

                Name: Jenney & Mark
                Filing Date: October 2003
                Interview date: June 3, 2004

                We got to Norfolk right on time, at 1pm. Once inside, someone directed
                Mark to put our appointment letter in a letter box which had his name
                and interview time printed on a sheet. About 2 minutes later, a woman
                came out and called his name.

                After reaching Ms Jones' desk, she had us raise our right hands and
                swear to tell the truth. She asked for our drivers licenses for
                identity verification, then had Mark sign and fingerprint a form, once
                on each side. I'm not sure what the form was for, though. She also
                mentioned that Mark's security checks were all completed, and seemed
                pleased about that.

                Ms Jones was extremely pleasant and friendly, which was so nice. It made
                the experience much easier, I think. She started flipping through our
                file (about one inch thick!) and made a comment about the medical exam.
                You see, we'd sent Norfolk a letter a few months before requesting
                clarification over whether Mark needed an updated medical exam or a
                vaccination supplement for his AOS interview. We got a letter back
                saying he did not require either. She basically confirmed what the
                letter said, that it was just a default included on the appointment
                letter but not actually needed for K1ers like Mark.

                At that point, I asked Ms Jones about it, and told her that I'd heard of
                many other K1ers who are told to get new medical exams done anyway. She
                said that that shouldn't happen, because it just meant applicants had to
                waste time and money getting something they really didn't need. She also
                said that a memo had been sent out advising officers NOT to ask for
                another medical exam when it wasn't required. Unfortunately I didn't
                think at the time to ask her whether that memo was USCIS-wide or just at
                Norfolk. But at the very least, she seemed to feel pretty bad for those
                people who shell out $200-$400 for a medical exam that's for the most
                part not needed.

                Then she started asking Mark those questions that are obviously a
                formality but have to be asked, such as, "Have you ever been a
                prostitute?" and "Have you ever been a member of the Communist party?" I
                couldn't help but muffle a giggle, which I know is totally immature but
                I couldn't help it! It was also funny how she started ticking off "No"
                before Mark even said his answers! And when she read the last one -- "Do
                you plan on practicing polygamy?" -- I laughed out loud and said, "You'd
                better not!" to which she also smiled.

                Ms Jones asked us how and when we'd met, and Mark began telling her how
                we'd met online in Feb 2002. She then asked how long it was until we'd
                met in person, and he explained that due to job constraints we couldn't
                meet for 7 months, until Sept 2002. She asked how we'd spent that time
                apart, and I explained that we'd spent every day emailing, phoning
                and/or chatting online. To my surprise she said something about how that
                must have helped us really get to know each other well, to which we both
                agreed. Then we told her that because we felt pretty certain that we
                would ultimately end up together, we'd researched the K1 option before
                Mark even came over, which allowed us to file the petition soon after he
                returned to the UK. I also told her about how Mark got to meet my family
                while he was here, how we got engaged, and that I travelled to the UK
                later on to meet his family.

                At that point, she asked for our photos. We had 3-5 of us together, with
                and without relatives, including one from our wedding. She asked if
                Mark's family had been able to attend, and he said no, but that they
                came to visit us last fall for a bit. She commented on how pretty some
                of the scenery was in our photos.

                After the photos, she asked for documents showing we share a life
                together. I'd brought one original and one copy of each item, but she
                only wanted the copies. We gave her:

                * - Copy of lease (with Mark listed as co-occupant)
                * - Copy of joint auto insurance policy
                * - Copy of joint auto loan
                * - Copy of both medical insurance cards
                * - Copy of life insurance benefit (with Mark listed as beneficiary)
                * - Letter from bank verifying joint checking account
                * - Copy of recent joint checking account statement
                * - Copy of recent cleared checks from joint account
                * - Letter from bank verifying joint credit card account
                * - Copy of recent phone bill (both names listed)

                Also, I had updated the I-864 Affidavit of Support to reflect my 2003
                income. I got the new form notarized, and included copies of my 2003 tax
                transcript and W-2s. Ms Jones handed back to me the tax docs I'd
                originally included for 2000, as they were now being replaced by 2003.

                Ms Jones compiled everything together in our file and complimented us on
                being so organized. I enthusiastically told her that I had more if she
                needed it -- copies of letters and cards sent to us by friends and
                family -- but she said we had "more than enough." Well, better too much
                than too little, right?

                She then took his passport and stamped the I-551 in it -- YAY! She also
                gave him a confirmation letter that he'd been approved, and that he
                could travel outside the US with the stamp until he receives his green
                card, which he should get within 6 months. The letter also explains when
                we have to apply to have the conditions removed, in Spring 2006.

                After a congratulations and a handshake, it was over. We were outside
                again at 1.35pm -- a whopping 35 minutes!

                ~ Jenney

                --
                Posted via http://britishexpats.com

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thinking Ahead and Planning for AOS Interview

                  So me being the anal managerial type and always being a few steps ahead of the game {comes from being in my job for WAY TOO LONG} I am starting to think ahead about what to get ready for the Interview. I know that everyone gets their own "list" but was wondering what everyone else has experienced. As you know we are a VWP marraige so if there's anyone out there that can relate to this, maybe you can let me know what was required. Thanks to Secret Garden's Interview Experience Post I found out about the kids birth records etc. and already have them! Thanks SG! So please, if you will post what was asked of all of you to bring to the Interview, I will start getting everything together. My lawyer laughs at me being so organized. {he says I am a riot!} Guess all these years of management has paid off in a way I never planned on! Thanks in advance. Debs
                  Here is what we posted on the Kamya AOS Interview site:

                  Field Office: Norfolk, Virginia - 5

                  Name: Jenney & Mark
                  Filing Date: October 2003
                  Interview date: June 3, 2004

                  We got to Norfolk right on time, at 1pm. Once inside, someone directed
                  Mark to put our appointment letter in a letter box which had his name
                  and interview time printed on a sheet. About 2 minutes later, a woman
                  came out and called his name.

                  After reaching Ms Jones' desk, she had us raise our right hands and
                  swear to tell the truth. She asked for our drivers licenses for
                  identity verification, then had Mark sign and fingerprint a form, once
                  on each side. I'm not sure what the form was for, though. She also
                  mentioned that Mark's security checks were all completed, and seemed
                  pleased about that.

                  Ms Jones was extremely pleasant and friendly, which was so nice. It made
                  the experience much easier, I think. She started flipping through our
                  file (about one inch thick!) and made a comment about the medical exam.
                  You see, we'd sent Norfolk a letter a few months before requesting
                  clarification over whether Mark needed an updated medical exam or a
                  vaccination supplement for his AOS interview. We got a letter back
                  saying he did not require either. She basically confirmed what the
                  letter said, that it was just a default included on the appointment
                  letter but not actually needed for K1ers like Mark.

                  At that point, I asked Ms Jones about it, and told her that I'd heard of
                  many other K1ers who are told to get new medical exams done anyway. She
                  said that that shouldn't happen, because it just meant applicants had to
                  waste time and money getting something they really didn't need. She also
                  said that a memo had been sent out advising officers NOT to ask for
                  another medical exam when it wasn't required. Unfortunately I didn't
                  think at the time to ask her whether that memo was USCIS-wide or just at
                  Norfolk. But at the very least, she seemed to feel pretty bad for those
                  people who shell out $200-$400 for a medical exam that's for the most
                  part not needed.

                  Then she started asking Mark those questions that are obviously a
                  formality but have to be asked, such as, "Have you ever been a
                  prostitute?" and "Have you ever been a member of the Communist party?" I
                  couldn't help but muffle a giggle, which I know is totally immature but
                  I couldn't help it! It was also funny how she started ticking off "No"
                  before Mark even said his answers! And when she read the last one -- "Do
                  you plan on practicing polygamy?" -- I laughed out loud and said, "You'd
                  better not!" to which she also smiled.

                  Ms Jones asked us how and when we'd met, and Mark began telling her how
                  we'd met online in Feb 2002. She then asked how long it was until we'd
                  met in person, and he explained that due to job constraints we couldn't
                  meet for 7 months, until Sept 2002. She asked how we'd spent that time
                  apart, and I explained that we'd spent every day emailing, phoning
                  and/or chatting online. To my surprise she said something about how that
                  must have helped us really get to know each other well, to which we both
                  agreed. Then we told her that because we felt pretty certain that we
                  would ultimately end up together, we'd researched the K1 option before
                  Mark even came over, which allowed us to file the petition soon after he
                  returned to the UK. I also told her about how Mark got to meet my family
                  while he was here, how we got engaged, and that I travelled to the UK
                  later on to meet his family.

                  At that point, she asked for our photos. We had 3-5 of us together, with
                  and without relatives, including one from our wedding. She asked if
                  Mark's family had been able to attend, and he said no, but that they
                  came to visit us last fall for a bit. She commented on how pretty some
                  of the scenery was in our photos.

                  After the photos, she asked for documents showing we share a life
                  together. I'd brought one original and one copy of each item, but she
                  only wanted the copies. We gave her:

                  * - Copy of lease (with Mark listed as co-occupant)
                  * - Copy of joint auto insurance policy
                  * - Copy of joint auto loan
                  * - Copy of both medical insurance cards
                  * - Copy of life insurance benefit (with Mark listed as beneficiary)
                  * - Letter from bank verifying joint checking account
                  * - Copy of recent joint checking account statement
                  * - Copy of recent cleared checks from joint account
                  * - Letter from bank verifying joint credit card account
                  * - Copy of recent phone bill (both names listed)

                  Also, I had updated the I-864 Affidavit of Support to reflect my 2003
                  income. I got the new form notarized, and included copies of my 2003 tax
                  transcript and W-2s. Ms Jones handed back to me the tax docs I'd
                  originally included for 2000, as they were now being replaced by 2003.

                  Ms Jones compiled everything together in our file and complimented us on
                  being so organized. I enthusiastically told her that I had more if she
                  needed it -- copies of letters and cards sent to us by friends and
                  family -- but she said we had "more than enough." Well, better too much
                  than too little, right?

                  She then took his passport and stamped the I-551 in it -- YAY! She also
                  gave him a confirmation letter that he'd been approved, and that he
                  could travel outside the US with the stamp until he receives his green
                  card, which he should get within 6 months. The letter also explains when
                  we have to apply to have the conditions removed, in Spring 2006.

                  After a congratulations and a handshake, it was over. We were outside
                  again at 1.35pm -- a whopping 35 minutes!

                  ~ Jenney

                  --
                  Posted via http://britishexpats.com

                  Comment

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