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  • My Son's Story From His Perspective


    U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth?



    On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get
    married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in
    Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise,
    when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to
    get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful
    sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was
    able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would
    take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally
    was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I
    then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004,
    however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process,
    not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad
    contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do.
    After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could
    file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in
    4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th,
    2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to
    process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat
    relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to
    working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first
    form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I
    had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms,
    and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back
    to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad
    call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there
    was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally
    the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be
    in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to
    check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the
    Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to
    get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for
    the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us.






  • #2
    My Son's Story From His Perspective

    >Subject: My Son's Story From His Perspective
    From: "Mike Dobony" [email protected]Date: 12/22/2004 6:11 PM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth?On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to getmarried to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate inLagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise,when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just toget some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painfulsunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I wasable to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it wouldtake for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finallywas able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. Ithen received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004,however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process,not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dadcontact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do.After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I couldfile another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th,2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days toprocess the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhatrelieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close toworking on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the firstform was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, Ihad my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms,and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it backto Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dadcall them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said therewas no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finallythe case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would bein Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate tocheck to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into theConsulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks toget to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting forthe Next Lie the U.S. government will give us.
    Consider yourself lucky that you are a US citizen and can get your wife to
    the US in a short time. Permanent residents have to wait years to get their
    spouses to the US! They cannot even visit on a tourist visa! Now that you are
    aware of that, makes your problem seem insignificant, eh?

    Comment


    • #3
      My Son's Story From His Perspective

      Subject: My Son's Story From His PerspectiveFrom: "Mike Dobony" [email protected]Date: 12/22/2004 6:11 PM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth?On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria togetmarried to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S.Consulate inLagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To mysurprise,when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending linejust toget some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painfulsunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet.I wasable to find the form I needed also including the amount of time itwouldtake for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. Ifinallywas able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. forprocessing. Ithen received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th,2004,however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days toprocess,not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I hadmy dadcontact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they coulddo.After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that Icouldfile another form that the senators said would get my wife into theU.S. in4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July7th,2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 daystoprocess the case. To us it was still a long time, but we weresomewhatrelieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not evenclose toworking on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that thefirstform was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health inNigeria, Ihad my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process theforms,and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and sendit backto Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had mydadcall them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They saidtherewas no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited.Finallythe case was approved on December 10th and was told that the casewould bein Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S.Consulate tocheck to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting intotheConsulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6weeks toget to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife,waiting forthe Next Lie the U.S. government will give us. Consider yourself lucky that you are a US citizen and can get your wife to the US in a short time. Permanent residents have to wait years to get their spouses to the US! They cannot even visit on a tourist visa! Now that you are aware of that, makes your problem seem insignificant, eh?
      What makes you so special?
      Loads of people are going through this all the time and having to put up
      with the wait, it's a pain in the arse, but if you can't be arsed with
      the wait, you could always settle in your spouses country.

      --
      Posted via http://britishexpats.com

      Comment


      • #4
        My Son's Story From His Perspective

        What makes you so special? Loads of people are going through this all the time and having to put up with the wait, it's a pain in the arse, but if you can't be arsed with the wait, you could always settle in your spouses country.
        So you filed in May and it's now December... 8 months instead of 6 It's
        only a little over. Considering the thousands of applications they have
        to process, I would think yourself lucky...
        Oh and it is well known that immigration is almost ALLWAYS chaotic and
        behind on processing!

        You could consider this as a practise for life in the USA... The 'I will
        have it for you tomorrow' comments that never arrive... The 'We must
        meet for coffee' plans that never happen... LOL

        Chill and enjoy life... The future is happening now, make the
        most of today.

        --
        Posted via http://britishexpats.com

        Comment


        • #5
          My Son's Story From His Perspective

          U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise, when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004, however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process, not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do. After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th, 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms, and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us.
          Mike and Brian:
          I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude
          the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have
          encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go
          to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to
          the US.
          You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task,
          you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research
          and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap
          attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are
          certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of
          meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online.

          To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility
          and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own
          health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in
          Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in
          several and have managed to look after myself.
          There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including
          disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a
          rant to stand on.

          Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this
          week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective
          if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate
          work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to
          learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct
          information and is not responsible for any errors you make from
          following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes
          here were Brian, and Mike.

          Our previous conversations are here:
          http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15

          Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out.

          --
          Posted via http://britishexpats.com

          Comment


          • #6
            My Son's Story From His Perspective

            Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online. To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself. There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike. Our previous conversations are here: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15 Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out.
            Here, Here, Meauxna

            I was about to respond when I saw your name and I knew that you would
            take care of the minute details. Like father, like son it appears.

            And all this in a country where the occurrences of visa fraud and scams
            are the norm. Even if the petition(s) get there quickly, wanna bet
            that the Mrs. has a difficult time dealing with the US Consulate and
            that small problems with her documentation hinder their getting a
            speedy visa.

            Rete

            --
            I'm not an attorney. This disclaimer is valid in NYS!
            Posted via http://britishexpats.com

            Comment


            • #7
              My Son's Story From His Perspective


              "meauxna" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message
              news:[email protected] m...
              U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise, when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004, however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process, not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do. After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th, 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms, and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us.
              Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online.
              He did months of research before going into this. I suggest you try living
              in the conditions he has had to endure for what will end up being almost a
              year. He compared it to being worse than a garbage dump. She was concerned
              about returning to Nigeria because of the death threats against her and her
              sister. The person who made those death threats was discovered present at
              the death of her sister. He has endured constant diarrea and headaches and
              lack of sanitary food (the livestock feeds at the sewers, which are also the
              streets) How many of you "self-educated users" had to endure those
              conditions?
              To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself.
              I knwo others who have done the same thing, but when I describe those
              conditions they cringe. Those who were born there are accustomed to them.
              Even those from these 3rd world conditions you describe shudder at the
              conditions I describe. My coworker is from Ghana and he is suprised at the
              sanitary conditions in Nigeria.

              Again, all this is said after MONTHS of research at various marriage web
              sites, including USCIS and talking to others who have gone through these
              procedures before.

              Until going through this myself I didn't understand the stupidity of the
              system. It is wrong to put US citizens through this and it is wrong for
              permenant residents.
              There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike.
              And you are numbed by the abuse endured by the government. We HAVE
              complained with the Department of State. More liars distruxting liars.
              Our previous conversations are here: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15 Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out. -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com

              Comment


              • #8
                My Son's Story From His Perspective

                "meauxna" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message news:[email protected] m...
                U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise, when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004, however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process, not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do. After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th, 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms, and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us. Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online.
                He did months of research before going into this. I suggest you try living in the conditions he has had to endure for what will end up being almost a year. He compared it to being worse than a garbage dump. She was concerned about returning to Nigeria because of the death threats against her and her sister. The person who made those death threats was discovered present at the death of her sister. He has endured constant diarrea and headaches and lack of sanitary food (the livestock feeds at the sewers, which are also the streets) How many of you "self-educated users" had to endure those conditions?
                To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself.
                I knwo others who have done the same thing, but when I describe those conditions they cringe. Those who were born there are accustomed to them. Even those from these 3rd world conditions you describe shudder at the conditions I describe. My coworker is from Ghana and he is suprised at the sanitary conditions in Nigeria. Again, all this is said after MONTHS of research at various marriage web sites, including USCIS and talking to others who have gone through these procedures before. Until going through this myself I didn't understand the stupidity of the system. It is wrong to put US citizens through this and it is wrong for permenant residents.
                There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike.
                And you are numbed by the abuse endured by the government. We HAVE complained with the Department of State. More liars distruxting liars.
                Our previous conversations are here: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15 Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out. -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com
                Unfortunately, the government couldn't care less, your bringing a
                foreigner to this country, could quite as easily up sticks and move to
                another country all together if you can't be arsed with the way USCIS
                deals with things and not liking Nigeria...Also, he doesn't have to stay
                there, he chooses to put up with the conditions to be with his wife, he
                could just as easily wait here.

                --
                Posted via http://britishexpats.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  My Son's Story From His Perspective

                  "meauxna" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message news:[email protected] m...
                  U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise, when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004, however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process, not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do. After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th, 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms, and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us. Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online.
                  He did months of research before going into this. I suggest you try living in the conditions he has had to endure for what will end up being almost a year. He compared it to being worse than a garbage dump. She was concerned about returning to Nigeria because of the death threats against her and her sister. The person who made those death threats was discovered present at the death of her sister. He has endured constant diarrea and headaches and lack of sanitary food (the livestock feeds at the sewers, which are also the streets) How many of you "self-educated users" had to endure those conditions?
                  To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself.
                  I knwo others who have done the same thing, but when I describe those conditions they cringe. Those who were born there are accustomed to them. Even those from these 3rd world conditions you describe shudder at the conditions I describe. My coworker is from Ghana and he is suprised at the sanitary conditions in Nigeria. Again, all this is said after MONTHS of research at various marriage web sites, including USCIS and talking to others who have gone through these procedures before. Until going through this myself I didn't understand the stupidity of the system. It is wrong to put US citizens through this and it is wrong for permenant residents.
                  There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike.
                  And you are numbed by the abuse endured by the government. We HAVE complained with the Department of State. More liars distruxting liars.
                  Our previous conversations are here: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15 Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out. -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com
                  A great many people on the forum could have told you all this..had you
                  asked ..Your research was not very far reaching was it...
                  Not very well travelled are you .. There are many places just like that
                  ..
                  What color is the sky in your world?

                  --
                  Posted via http://britishexpats.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My Son's Story From His Perspective


                    "meauxna" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message
                    news:[email protected] m...
                    U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria to get married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. Consulate in Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my surprise, when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending line just to get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got painful sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the Internet. I was able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time it would take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I finally was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for processing. I then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, 2004, however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to process, not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I had my dad contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they could do. After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out that I could file another form that the senators said would get my wife into the U.S. in 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of July 7th, 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to 90 days to process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were somewhat relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not even close to working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice that the first form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health in Nigeria, I had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process the forms, and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and send it back to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I had my dad call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They said there was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not expedited. Finally the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the case would be in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. Consulate to check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting into the Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take 4-6 weeks to get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my wife, waiting for the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us.
                    Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online. To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself. There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike.
                    I talked to NVC on Monday. They said that Packet 3 would be sent to the
                    consulate and they could speed things up by picking it up in person. They
                    also said that the consulate would be doing more research and investigation.
                    My son contacted the consulate and they said they do nothing except the
                    interview. Since you know so much,who is lying?


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My Son's Story From His Perspective


                      "Bob" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message
                      news:[email protected] m...
                      "meauxna" <[email protected]_expats.com> wrote in message news:[email protected] m...
                      > U.S. Government: Can they tell the truth? > > > > On May 1st, 2004, I, Brian Dobony, a US Citizen, came to Nigeria > to > get > married to my bride. The same day I came, I went to the U.S. > Consulate in > Lagos for forms that I needed for my wife to go to the U.S. To my > surprise, > when I got to the Consulate they made me wait in a never-ending > line > just to > get some forms. I never did get in that day, but instead got > painful > sunburn. I then decided to get the forms I needed off the > Internet. > I was > able to find the form I needed also including the amount of time > it > would > take for everything to be completed, which was up to 6 months. I > finally > was able to fill out the forms and send them to the U.S. for > processing. I > then received a receipt that they received the forms on May 27th, > 2004, > however, the receipt told us that it would take about 600 days to > process, > not 6 months that was promised. I would not leave my wife so I > had my > dad > contact all three Iowa Representatives and find out what they > could > do. > After a lot of hassle due to me not being there, I found out > that I > could > file another form that the senators said would get my wife into > the > U.S. in > 4-6 months. We sent that form in and received a notice date of > July > 7th, > 2004 on the internet and also saying that it was taking 60 to > 90 days > to > process the case. To us it was still a long time, but we were > somewhat > relieved. Those 60 to 90 days came and they were still not > even close > to > working on our case. On November 2nd, 2004 we got a notice > that the > first > form was sent to California for Processing. Due to my health > in > Nigeria, I > had my uncle get hold of the USCIS, which is where they process > the > forms, > and they told us that they were going to expedite the case and > send it > back > to Nebraska to have it approved. After no news of approval I > had my > dad > call them back up to find out why it was taking so long. They > said > there > was no way to expedite a case and that my case was not > expedited. > Finally > the case was approved on December 10th and was told that the > case > would be > in Lagos in up to 14 days. A week later we went to the U.S. > Consulate > to > check to see if it arrived. Again, I had many problems getting > into > the > Consulate, and then now finding out that the case would take > 4-6 weeks > to > get to Lagos. So as I write I am still in Nigeria with my > wife, > waiting for > the Next Lie the U.S. government will give us. Mike and Brian: I've invested as much assitance as I am willing. Based on the attitude the two of you display, I am not surprised at the problems you have encountered on your way this past few months. You planned enough to go to Africa and marry a woman who you knew needed permission to move to the US. You did no research into what would be required to accomplish your task, you were not willing to spend money on someone who has done the research and been trained to navigate the system (a lawyer) and you have a crap attitude that is focused on *****ing, not solving your problem. You are certainly welcome to ***** all you like, but don't expect a lot of meaningful help from the community of self-educated users online.
                      He did months of research before going into this. I suggest you try living in the conditions he has had to endure for what will end up being almost a year. He compared it to being worse than a garbage dump. She was concerned about returning to Nigeria because of the death threats against her and her sister. The person who made those death threats was discovered present at the death of her sister. He has endured constant diarrea and headaches and lack of sanitary food (the livestock feeds at the sewers, which are also the streets) How many of you "self-educated users" had to endure those conditions?
                      To ice the cake, you have abandoned all sense of personal responsibility and are playing the victim card for not being able to mind your own health, life (?!) and employment. Many people live healthy lives in Nigeria. I've traveled to a lot of non-first world countries, lived in several and have managed to look after myself.
                      I knwo others who have done the same thing, but when I describe those conditions they cringe. Those who were born there are accustomed to them. Even those from these 3rd world conditions you describe shudder at the conditions I describe. My coworker is from Ghana and he is suprised at the sanitary conditions in Nigeria. Again, all this is said after MONTHS of research at various marriage web sites, including USCIS and talking to others who have gone through these procedures before. Until going through this myself I didn't understand the stupidity of the system. It is wrong to put US citizens through this and it is wrong for permenant residents.
                      There is nothing particularly unusal in your case, including disappointment when real timelines are learned. You really don't have a rant to stand on. Not that you've bothered to take on board anything that I've said this week in regards to your posts, but your rants will be more effective if you complain about the right people. The people at the Consulate work for the Dept of State, not USCIS. I'm sure you'll be thrilled to learn that "the government" is not required to give you correct information and is not responsible for any errors you make from following their advice. So the people who made the biggest mistakes here were Brian, and Mike.
                      And you are numbed by the abuse endured by the government. We HAVE complained with the Department of State. More liars distruxting liars.
                      Our previous conversations are here: http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...2&page=1&pp=15 Good luck to you all, hope you figure it all out. -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com
                      Unfortunately, the government couldn't care less, your bringing a foreigner to this country, could quite as easily up sticks and move to another country all together if you can't be arsed with the way USCIS deals with things and not liking Nigeria...Also, he doesn't have to stay there, he chooses to put up with the conditions to be with his wife, he could just as easily wait here.
                      And then what do you suggest? If he leaves she is in danger from her
                      grandmother-in-law (who apearantly killed her sister, as promised) and
                      forget about the consulate approving the visa. Then they need to file an
                      appeal and then what, fight for another 6 months? All they needed was some
                      straight answers so they could plan for the expected. We allowed an extra
                      month or so, but not an extra 6-12 months! Why is it so hard to just get a
                      straight, honest answer so people can make rational plans? Every step
                      taken, based on then current information from the "experts" is taken on
                      false information. Nobody has given us a straight answer yet! They took
                      riskes based on specific information and so far no information has been
                      correct.
                      -- Posted via http://britishexpats.com

                      Comment

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