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  • Worker's comp question

    I thought you could only draw worker's comp if you're out of work due to a work related injury, however someone told me today that you can still draw worker's comp if you were injured elsewhere, but cannot do your work anymore. Which is right?

  • #2
    The former. The latter would be insurance fraud and in most states is a dandy way of finding yourself out of work due to imprisionment.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
      The latter would be insurance fraud and in most states is a dandy way of finding yourself out of work due to imprisionment.
      Oh, Elle, I really would like that to be the case, but my state has never, ever incarcerated someone for WC insurance fraud!

      (OTOH, the largest carrier here got the list of those who had licenses to hunt moose one year and matched it to WC claimants. Folks who claimed to be unable to lift more than a few pounds were found hauling half ton moose out of the woods. No prosecutions, though).
      Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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      • #4
        My state just started really prosecuting these a year ago. Before it was a joke. Not any more.

        Even if it doesn't land the employee a guest of the state, it can be grounds to terminate their employment and of course WC benefits.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
          My state just started really prosecuting these a year ago. Before it was a joke. Not any more.

          Even if it doesn't land the employee a guest of the state, it can be grounds to terminate their employment and of course WC benefits.
          We are working on this, but it is a long haul in a very labor friendly state.
          Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the replies. I would never do anything that isn't legal. The other person I think just had some wrong information and thought that I could draw worker's comp legitimately.

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