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Chiropractor Visits California

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  • Chiropractor Visits California

    An employee may request to attend their own chiropractor if the employer does not have a medical provider network. Now, what if the employee misses the scheduled appointments with the chiropractor. What may I do? Suspension until they attend? Or, switch the employee back to our doctor? Please advise, this employee is giving me the run around. I confirmed with the chiropractor that this person has not attended the scheduled visits.
    Last edited by jpalacios25; 08-07-2006, 12:49 PM.

  • #2
    Where is your WC carrier in all this? If the employee is off work, the carrier should be cutting off payment as cooperation with a treatment plan is a requirement to receive TTD. If the employee is working, you can't make them seek treatment, but it does jeopardize their claim down the road.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      [QUOTE=ElleMD]Where is your WC carrier in all this?

      Our W/Comp carrier has not been the greatest and we are trying to switch from them because of situations like these. This is not the first time it happens. And, yes, the employee is still currently working in modified duties. In other words, I just have to sit and wait?

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      • #4
        Well, being as you can not force anyone to undergo medical treatment at any time, yes. If the issue is that the employee can not return to regular duty until after treatment, you can make light duty contingent upon participation in a treatment program. You don't have to keep offering light duty if the employee is intentionally dragging out the treatment process. You never have to offer light duty, but in this case, you really don't have to.

        I would run it by the carrier and possibly the carrier's legal counsel. In most states, if the employee is not actively treating, you don't owe TTD even if you cease offering light duty. I'm not familiar enough with CA case law to know for sure how the court will view this, but this is how we run it in my state and mine is very liberal with WC. Employees either get their tushes back in treatment asap, or go for a full and final settlement (I think it is a C&R in CA). I don't allow them to sit on light duty if they aren't treating.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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        • #5
          Thanks for your help.

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