Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

lunch breaks

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • lunch breaks

    I currently work as an emergency pre-hospital service provider in Pennsylvania. We are scheduled 12.5 hours, but only get paid for 12. We are required to remain "on call" while we are taking our lunch break and if an alarm comes in we are obligated to stop what we are doing and respond. There are many, many days that we never get back to that "lunch break". What is the law regarding getting paid for the entire 12.5 hours considering we are at the mercy of the community? We are not entitled to 30 minutes of "non-work" time. Thank you.

  • #2
    On-Call

    On-call time does not need to be paid if you can do things such as get lunch, etc., even if it is interrupted. Of course, if you are called bak to work, you must be paid for the working time.
    Lillian Connell

    Forum Moderator
    www.laborlawtalk.com

    Comment


    • #3
      lunch breaks

      I guess on-call was the wrong teminology. We are on the clock for 12.5 and only getting paid for 12. We do not have scheduled breaks nor are we permitted to leave the premises. Most days we work through the .5 hour that is deducted from our pay. Should we start keeping track?

      Comment


      • #4
        Keeping Track

        Yes, absolutely. And, if the time you are off is less than 20 minutes, the entire lunch must be paid.
        Lillian Connell

        Forum Moderator
        www.laborlawtalk.com

        Comment


        • #5
          If you're working through lunch, then you have to be paid for that time.

          I expect the payroll system has a default set up so that it automatically takes a 30 minute deduction unless it's overridden. I suggest you talk to your supervisor (nicely) about the fact that there are many days that you and your co-workers never get to take a lunch break but are not being paid for the time as required by State and federal wage and hour laws.

          If they don't start paying for the work time, then your next step is to contact your State's Department of Labor.

          Comment

          Working...
          X