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Paid time off District of Columbia

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  • Paid time off District of Columbia

    I have 2 similar questions.

    1. If I work 2 positions in a company with different rates. (Job A-15/hr, and job B-17/hr) and take paid time off, what pay rate does my company have to use to pay that time off?

    2. If I work mon-thurs 41 hours then call out Friday, can they force me to use my paid time off for Friday's shift?

    I am a non exempt employee with a minimum of 36 hours/ week to be considered full time.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Nsrawlings View Post
    I have 2 similar questions.

    1. If I work 2 positions in a company with different rates. (Job A-15/hr, and job B-17/hr) and take paid time off, what pay rate does my company have to use to pay that time off?

    2. If I work mon-thurs 41 hours then call out Friday, can they force me to use my paid time off for Friday's shift?

    I am a non exempt employee with a minimum of 36 hours/ week to be considered full time.
    (answers are from a federal law standpoint)
    (1) yes, especially if you earn PTO from the higher paying rather than the lower paying. PTO is company specific and they may choose but you should be notified ahead of time what the pay rate would be for PTO. They could have a policy of paying all PTO at minimum wage or even 1/2 rate and since they are non-worked hours, they aren't required to pay at minimum or at all, unless they have an established policy to do so.

    (2) Yes, again PTO is company specific and doesn't have to be given at all. However, you would earn the 1 hour OT and then the pay for Friday (so say you normally work 7.5 hours per day, you would get 40 regular hours, 1 OT hour and 7.5 hours of PTO at the PTO rate). I understand you want to "save" the PTO, but employers are allowed to require the use of PTO prior to allowing any unpaid timeoff (except in some FMLA situations which you aren't asking about)
    Last edited by hr for me; 05-03-2017, 06:00 AM.

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    • #3
      And speaking from the private sector:

      1.) The law does not address paid time off. It's between you and your employer

      2.) Yes.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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