Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

California automotive mechanics and flat rate pay California

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • California automotive mechanics and flat rate pay California

    Is it legal in the state of California for a journeyman automotive mechanic to be paid ONLY flat rate? In other words, if a mechanic is given 4 hours to complete a job and it actually takes, let's say 8 hours, is it legal for the mechanic to only get paid the 4 hours or should he be paid the full 8 hours it took him to complete the job? Any answers and/or help would be EXTREMELY helpful!

  • #2
    The employer still has to take into account minimum wage and OT laws and make sure that the flat rate covers those. If it does not, the employer has to pay the difference in wages. That said, if a job should take 4 hours and takes 9 hours, while the minimum and OT do have to be paid, the employer can discipline the employee for bad/slow performance. Hopefully the flat rates have been setup using the normal amount of time it takes to do the specific job and to reward performance. So those who complete jobs faster (better performers) make better money and those that are slower make less overall.

    So let's say the flat rate is $50 for the job and minimum wage is $10 (for ease of calculations, not the true amounts). If the job actually takes more than 5 hours, the employer would owe the employer more than the flat rate of $50. If it took 6 1/2 hours, they would owe $65. If it took 9 hours they would owe $80 plus $15 or $95.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have experience with mechanics pay but not in CA.

      I believe hr for me left out that the calculation would not be based on job. In most states it would be based on the work week. I know CA has daily OT regulations so it may be a daily calculation there.

      So if you had two jobs and 1 took you 1 hour but you were paid for 2 while the next took you 6 hours but you were paid for 4, the calculation would need to be based on both jobs, not just one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by HRinMA View Post
        I have experience with mechanics pay but not in CA.

        I believe hr for me left out that the calculation would not be based on job. In most states it would be based on the work week. I know CA has daily OT regulations so it may be a daily calculation there.

        So if you had two jobs and 1 took you 1 hour but you were paid for 2 while the next took you 6 hours but you were paid for 4, the calculation would need to be based on both jobs, not just one.
        Agreed it is based on the total pay for the day versus how many actual hours you worked. If one job paid $50 and it took 6 hours and a second job paid $100 and it took 3 hours, you would be paid $150 for 9 hours which is more than the $95 required (at min wage of $10 an hour). So yes, it would be by the day since CA has daily overtime. My original example only took into account one job per day.

        Comment


        • #5
          Agreed with the other answers. If the mechanic supplies their own tools, then there is a chance that there is a twice-minimum-wage rule in play.
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

          Comment

          Working...
          X