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What is considered part time hours in CT? Connecticut

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  • What is considered part time hours in CT? Connecticut

    I would like to know if CT has a law which declares or states what exactly is part time employment and to state if there's a minimum number of hours an employer must provide. I worked for an employer who did not provide me any hours for almost 3 weeks and I believe this is illegal.

    Thanks for those who can help!

  • #2
    There are no laws governing part time and full time employee status - that's completely up to the employer. There are also no laws specifying minimum numbers of hour for employees - 0 is just as legal as 100.

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    • #3
      Please provide me a link to this data you are declaring - I don't believe this to be true

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      • #4
        In no state is there a law that dictates to an employer how many hours they must schedule an employee. Unless you have a bona fide and enforceable contract that expressly and in so many words guarantees you x number of hours per week, you are entitled to exactly as many or as few hours as the employer chooses to schedule you for. If that's zero, then you get zero hours. So no, scheduling you for zero hours for three weeks is not illegal in CT or any other state.

        If you are scheduled for no hours, file for unemployment. No one has to say the magic words, you're fired, for you do do that. It may jog the employer into scheduling you again, and if it doesn't, at least you'll have some income.

        BTW, very few states have specific definitions of full or part time in the ones that do, it has to do with health insurance only. Such laws do not force an employer to schedule you.
        Last edited by cbg; 11-01-2014, 06:24 AM.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CTGuy45 View Post
          Please provide me a link to this data you are declaring - I don't believe this to be true
          That's not how it works. There doesn't have to be a law giving the employer permission to schedule you for zero hours - there would have to be one that requires him to schedule you. So how about you provide a link to the law that says he has to give you x hours per week?
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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          • #6
            The Bureau of Labor Statistics calculates one to 34 hours as part-time employment and 35+ as full-time. Federal law defines a part-time employee as someone who works less than 1,000 hours per year for the same company (17.5 hours per week).

            How's that for starters? Now I am NOT going to argue of what is and what isn't - provide a link to the information you are providing or don't even bother responding - this goes for everyone!

            Thank you.

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            • #7
              Wow, that's one way to turn off the legal experts here! Sorry pal, you don't get to decide who responds and who doesn't.

              If you're so sure you know more than we do (we who have combined more than 150 years' labour law working experience), why are you posting here?

              And regarding a link - there is no link because there is no law to link to. As you've been told.

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              • #8
                That's aggregate statistics and has nothing whatsoever to do with a requirement that you be scheduled for any particular number of hours.

                http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/gendocs/contact.html

                There's the contact and phone number for the CT state department of labor. Monday, call them and tell them it's illegal for your employer to schedule you for zero hours. See what they say.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                • #9
                  And those examples that you posted only apply to very specific uses or reasons. There are definitions of PT/FT for things like federal 401k rules and who counts as a FT employee under federal PPACA -- but those aren't a minimum requirement but rather a maximum. To protect PT employees who do work more than PT hours. So employers don't group out employees by their hours. Although employers still have the right to limit hours of employees to whatever the employer deems necessary.

                  But none of those apply to the question you are asking. So we can't provide a law/link/backup. Because it does not exist. Your employer could ask you to work 1/2 hour a week (or none this week and 19 hours next week). He or she can define PT or FT as they wish within the certain type of parameters listed above, but generally those are for things like benefits, unemployment claims, etc but none are requirements that they give you any hours.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cbg View Post
                    http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/gendocs/contact.html

                    There's the contact and phone number for the CT state department of labor. Monday, call them and tell them it's illegal for your employer to schedule you for zero hours. See what they say.
                    And when you don't come back and tell us what they said, it's because they told you exactly what we said.

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                    • #11
                      attacking and sarcasm as obvious elements of a forum - thanks for posting your opinions (which ultimately do not matter) and forcing me to defend the information I seek....that' real comforting.

                      I'm done with this post and this forum - don't bother replying because it no longer matters here

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                      • #12
                        Don't forget to call the DOL on Monday.
                        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CTGuy45 View Post
                          I'm done with this post and this forum
                          Because you know (and we know) you won't be man enough to come back and admit you were wrong, after the DOL sets you straight.

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                          • #14
                            Agreed with the other answers. The major federal labor law is FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act). That is where the federal minimum wage and overtime rules come from. I am going to reference federal DOL's opinion on this issue

                            http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/workhou...employment.htm

                            Part-time Employment

                            The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not address part-time employment. Whether an employee is considered full-time or part-time does not change the application of the FLSA.
                            "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                            Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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                            • #15
                              The way laws work in this country is that you may act as you choose unless there is a law forbidding it. That includes employment practices. Employers are free to conduct business as they see fit unless there is a law which makes that practice illegal. As no state nor the federal government has any law requiring a minimum number of hours per week (or any other measure of time), you simply are not going to find something which does not exist. That is like asking us to point to a law which says that you may wear a green shirt on Thursdays or go grocery shopping on Friday. You will never find a law which states you can do these things as the legislature has not found sufficient cause to enact a law stipulating those acts are legal. In the case of an employer, there may be very good reason for not forcing a set number of hours per week. Business could be slow, inclement weather, the employee is under investigation, the employee broke a rule and has been suspended, the employee is out for medical reasons or to handle a personal situation, the employee's skills are not needed at this time, or any number of other reasons.

                              If you look to your state's DOL site, you will see that your employer may reduce your hours legally.

                              - 9. Can my employer cut my pay, reduce my hours or benefits, or change my job duties?Yes, as long as you are notified in advance of the pay period and in writing. This is covered in the CT General Statute Section 31-71f.
                              https://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/wgwkst...-employees.htm

                              Sec. 31-71f. Employer to furnish employee certain information. Each employer shall: (1) Advise his employees in writing, at the time of hiring, of the rate of remuneration, hours of employment and wage payment schedules, and (2) make available to his employees, either in writing or through a posted notice maintained in a place accessible to his employees, any employment practices and policies or change therein with regard to wages, vacation pay, sick leave, health and welfare benefits and comparable matters.
                              (1967, P.A. 714, S. 6.)
                              Cited. 212 C. 294, 303.
                              I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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