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15 minute intervals Pennsylvania

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  • 15 minute intervals Pennsylvania

    In Pennsylvania if your quitting time is 3:30 pm and your emploter requires you to perform duties past that time at what interval are you due pay for the next 15 minute Interval?

  • #2
    That depends entirely on your employer's payroll "time rounding" practices and how long you worked past 3:30.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by clarks employee View Post
      In Pennsylvania if your quitting time is 3:30 pm and your emploter requires you to perform duties past that time at what interval are you due pay for the next 15 minute Interval?
      Your employer is required to pay you for all time worked. There is such a thing as rounding, and if used there are specific rules that must be applied in order to pay using rounding. Here are the Federal rules on rounding and here is the site http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs53.htm:

      Rounding Hours Worked

      Some employers track employee hours worked in 15 minute increments, and the FLSA allows an employer to round employee time to the nearest quarter hour. However, an employer may violate the FLSA minimum wage and overtime pay requirements if the employer always rounds down. Employee time from 1 to 7 minutes may be rounded down, and thus not counted as hours worked, but employee time from 8 to 14 minutes must be rounded up and counted as a quarter hour of work time. See Regulations 29 CFR 785.48(b).

      Example #1:

      An intermediate care facility docks employees by a full quarter hour (15 minutes) when they start work more than seven minutes after the start of their scheduled shift. Does this practice comply with the FLSA requirements? Yes, as long as the employees’ time is rounded up a full quarter hour when the employee starts working from 8 to 14 minutes before their shift or if the employee works from 8 to 14 minutes beyond the scheduled end of their shift.

      Example #2:

      An employee’s schedule is 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. with a thirty minute unpaid lunch break. The employee receives overtime compensation after 40 hours in a workweek. The employee clocks in 10 minutes early every day and clocks out 7 minutes late each day. The employer follows the standard rounding rules. Is the employee entitled to overtime compensation? Yes. If the employer rounds back a quarter hour each morning to 6:45 a.m. and rounds back each evening to 3:30 p.m., the employee will show a total of 41.25 hours worked during that workweek. The employee will be entitled to additional overtime compensation for the 1.25 hours over 40.

      Example #3:

      An employer only records and pays for time if employees work in full 15 minute increments. An employee paid $10 per hour is scheduled to work 8 hours a day Monday through Friday, for a total of 40 hours a week. The employee always clocks out 12 minutes after the end of her shift. The employee is paid $400 per week. Does this comply with the FLSA? No, the employer has violated the overtime requirements. The employee worked an hour each week (12 minutes times 5) that was not compensated. The employer has not violated the minimum wage requirement because the employee was paid $9.75 per hour ($400 divided by 41 hours). However, the employer owes the employee for one hour of overtime each week.

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      • #4
        We're assuming you're an hourly non-exempt employee - "seems" like it based on your post/question.
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