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Paying Wages when Power goes out California

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  • Paying Wages when Power goes out California

    The office power went out at our office and we are told we have to use our FTO and that the office does not pay this... is this legal... we have no policy stating if a natural disaster happens? And before we left the main boss said that we would get paid because it wasnt our fault the power went out.

    Please advise...

    I am doing time cards and need to call the CFO on this.

  • #2
    Exempt or nonexempt? Makes a difference.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      We have both...

      The main boss said we would be paid, the CFO is saying no, does that matter? Some of us would have stayed and found stuff to do because we need the pay but were told we would be paid, so we left.

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      • #4
        Exempt have to be paid, period, no question about it (as long as they showed up for work for any length of time).
        http://www.dol.gov/dol/allcfr/ESA/Ti...CFR541.602.htm

        Nonexempts, legally, do not have to be paid for any time not worked.
        See "exceptions" here:
        http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_ReportingTimePay.htm

        Having said that, IMHO, the company should pony up to what the boss told the employees, just because it's the "right" thing to do; however there is not legal requirement they do so.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          Agreed with Patty. Plus that, I have a "maybe" for you. Way back in the 1980s I worked for a manufacturing company in CA. When the power went out, the factory manager would have me document all wages paid for which no actual work was performed as a result of the power outage. Apparently there was some way to bill PG&E for this. Now, this was the 1980s and we were a manufacturing company and I had no direct contact with PG&E, the billing or the cash receipt. Still, this happened more then once (over several years), and it seems likely that the plant manager would not keep going through this unless he thought that a payment was likely.
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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          • #6
            Business continuity insurance maybe?
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              No idea. It might be worth talking to PG&E (or checking the Internet) just to see if anything pops.
              "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
              Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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