Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

full time California

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • full time California

    Can i work over 8 hrs a day .If I want too. volunteer to get ahead at work ?

  • #2
    That is up to your employer. If you are a non-exempt employee & work overtime without approval, you have to be paid for the time - however, you can be disciplined up to & including being terminated for doing so.

    If you're exempt, you don't get paid anything other than your regular fixed weekly salary no matter how many hrs. you work. However, you are still required to work the hrs. you employer tells you to.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PRICCIE32 View Post
      Can i work over 8 hrs a day .If I want too. volunteer to get ahead at work ?
      Only if you qualify as an intern. Then you are subject to not getting paid!

      Comment


      • #4
        It would be illegal for your employer to allow you to work without pay, even if you want to.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cbg View Post
          It would be illegal for your employer to allow you to work without pay, even if you want to.
          Strange how that works. The government is protecting you from getting the experience you need to get ahead, because you might get taken advantage of.

          I have been there, and found out the hard way about internships and bad employers. The only cure is spending a lot of time talking to people in the industry, and checking up on there stories. (clear as mud!)

          Comment


          • #6
            I can only imagine how many kids would be "volunteered" to work without pay if it were allowed. It can be done as a legitimate intern for which school credit is allowed, if under a true internship plan. Experience can also be garnered by working as a volunteer for a non-profit. But the law does not permit unpaid work of any kind (outside of the aforesaid internships) for for-profit employers.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment


            • #7
              Books can be cooked for interns as well as for employees.

              I can tell you stories of hillbilly bosses with loaded guns under desks.

              You are in the field, and know the law. I will chose your answer every time.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is another, less politically correct, answer that does not apply in all situations and most likely does not apply in this instance either. But a few years back I was the HR manager for a very small bio-tech company that was working on an aspect of the human geonome project. We had an individual call us several times BEGGING us to allow him to come in and work for free just to get experience (it was at this time that I did my research on when you could and could not allow someone to work for free). We could not find a legal way to do it but we wouldn't have allowed it anyway - we had reason to believe that the reason he wanted in so badly was to facilitate industrial espionage.

                As I said, there are plenty of ways for someone to get experience without an employer violating the law to do it.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Betty3 View Post
                  If you are a non-exempt employee & work overtime without approval, you have to be paid for the time
                  Let me clarify that a bit. What I meant to say was whether you work OT with or without approval, if you are non-exempt, you must be paid for that time. Your employer can discipline you for working unapproved OT though.

                  You work the hours you employer tells/allows you to.
                  Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                  Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Unpaid internships are quite often illegal. If the employer benefits at all from the intern's work, it must be paid
                    "The most patriotic people in America are the working class" - Cecil Roberts - President UMWA

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That's not quite true, mcarson. An intern can be unpaid, legally, if under a school-sponsored program for which they receive school credit. But outside of that, yes, you would be correct.
                      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        http://laborlaw.typepad.com/labor_an...-internsh.html
                        "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                        Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Now that I see the list, I remember the further details. It was 2001 and in the intervening time I'd forgotten some of the specifics. I did know all this at the time.

                          Mea culpa.
                          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So I am owed wages for the hundreds of hours I worked as an intern? How many years back can I go?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              3 years, possibly 4.
                              "The most patriotic people in America are the working class" - Cecil Roberts - President UMWA

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X