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Salaried exempt question - Wisconsin

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  • Salaried exempt question - Wisconsin

    I am a salaried exempt employee and I am fairly new at my job. My office will be CLOSED for "spring cleaning" for 2 days where we will be unable to even enter the building during that time.

    I have been told that I will need to work weekends to make up for the missed time, work from home (which isn't an option for me because of the confidentiality of the work that I deal with - I cannot bring it home) or dip into my paid time off.

    Can they do this??

  • #2
    Legally, as an exempt employee, you must be paid for the days the company is closed. You can be required, however, to use PTO for the time (rather petty in my opinion, but there is no law that prohibits it).

    That doesn't, however, mean the company can't require you to "make up the time", although I agree that not only is that short-sighted, but have you asked your boss how you can be expected to do that from home if confidentiality issues prevent it?

    The fact that this employer seems to be terribly concerned about how many hours you work implies that they don't really understand the practical application of "exempt". May I ask what type of work you do?
    Last edited by Pattymd; 05-28-2008, 11:47 AM.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Response

      Funny enough, I am actually in HR. This is my first stint as a salaried employee though.

      The other people that are in my office are all hourly and are just extending their other workdays to make up for hours missed. I have been informed that I cannot do this as a salaried exempt employee. Any additional hours to make up for the missed time must be made done on days that I would not be normally scheduled to work.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ls3214 View Post
        Can they do this??
        Bottom line. Yes.

        They can insist that you work 168 hours a week (a few states and a few jobs are exceptions) with no overtime.

        If you cannot do the job from home AND they want you to do X, then you go to the office and do X.
        Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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        • #5
          I don't mean this to sounds harsh, honestly, but if you're in HR, I'm astonished you didn't know this.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pattymd View Post
            I don't mean this to sounds harsh, honestly, but if you're in HR, I'm astonished you didn't know this.
            It happens. I have worked for companies who had HR departments with more important stuff then this that they did not know. And I have taken over payroll departments with the same problem.

            The important thing is that questions are being asked. The dumb questions are the ones that are not asked.

            If the OP's company can afford to spend some money, I can strongly recommend The Payroll Source book, by the American Payroll Association. It is generally considered to be the "payroll bible" by people who do payroll for a living. And many of the things in there are of use to HR people.
            "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
            Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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