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Letter of Hires Washington

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  • Letter of Hires Washington

    I was hired one year and several weeks ago. In my letter of hire, which I was required to sign, it was outlined that I would received a 3 month performance review and 6 month performance/salary review. Nine months later (three months after the 6 month perform/sal review I inquired about my salary increase to HR. A few days later my direct supervisor pulled me aside and informed me that the company removed the 6 month salary reviews and that he thought he told me.

    Does anyone know the legalities of this action and what possible course of action I can take. I still have my copy of the letter of hire.

  • #2
    Most offer letters, which is what you have, do not reach the level of a binding contract. You will have to show it to an attorney in your state for a hard and fast answer, but the overwhelming likelihood is that the offer letter is not a contract and that the employer is not bound by what is in it.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Good point, Joe.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by joec
        Does the letter say salary review or salary increase. A salary review just means they will consider a salary increase.
        JoeC
        The didn't do a review either. I was under the impression that the letter of hire was the actual terms of employments and that by signing I have a reasonable expectation to those terms of hire. I don't recall if it specifies review or increase but either way, it is a reasonable expectation to at least get the review and then declined the increase wage, rather than just saying flat out that you're not eligible for it despite the fact that I was hired with the expectation of the possibility of the increase being there. Does that makes sense?

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        • #5
          I understand what you're saying but it does not change the facts; unless the letter is written in such a way as to constitute a binding contract (possible but very unlikely and which can only be determined by a Washington attorney who has read the letter), an offer letter indicates what the employer believes AT THE TIME will happen; it does not preclude the possiblity that business needs or policies will change.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment


          • #6
            Clark County.

            I don't think it'll be worth the effort. My energies should be directed at finding a new employer, I think.

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