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Consultant Mileage Q Pennsylvania

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  • Consultant Mileage Q Pennsylvania

    Okay, so my husband and I are doing some consulting work. One of the clients asked him to go to one of their locations that is 6 hours from us. Do we charge them mileage plus the hourly rate (we don't have day or half-day rates) or just mileage or just the hourly rate?

    Is it fair to charge the hourly rate for driving time? I told my husband I think it is because it is sooo far away and that is two days that he is not home (one day down and one day back).

    So, guess my question is, what is LEGAL and if it is legal to charge both mileage and hourly rate, what is a fair rate for driving time (i.e. normal hourly rate or a separate "driving" rate)?

    Thanks for any help.

    ETA: We are charging them for only the hours he is working for the week he is down there (8 hours per day for 5 days).
    Last edited by STC; 01-29-2010, 10:02 AM.

  • #2
    What does your contract with the client say that you will charge?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Did you put this in the contract with your client?
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

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      • #4
        There is no contract with the client.

        Should we be doing contracts with all clients the first time we do work for them?

        There was a verbal agreement to pay the hourly rate for work done locally and that same rate applied to the work done at this other location.
        Last edited by STC; 01-29-2010, 01:32 PM.

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        • #5
          Absolutely you should be.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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