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consecutive days work Pennsylvania

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  • consecutive days work Pennsylvania

    For a salary employee is there a maximum number of consecutive days they can be required to work? Or maximum number of hours per day/week.

    Example. Required to work over 16 hours on saturday, 10 hours on sunday, and still required to work monday thru friday 11 hours a day? Day off not permitted.

  • #2
    Salaried is only a pay method and has no legal status of its own. What matters is exempt or non-exempt. However, the answer is the same for both.

    PA is not one of the few states that has a one-day-rest-in-seven rule. So you can legally be required to work seven days a week.

    PA is also not one of the two states that limits the number of hours that can be worked in a week/pay period. NO state limits how many hours can be required to be worked in a day.

    So, technically in PA and about four fifths of the rest of the states, you could be required to work 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. There are certain industry specific exceptions for some positions where there is a public safety factor such as airline pilots and long haul truckers, as well as juveniles, but for the most part, for general employment, the law does not limit how many hours can be worked as long as the employees are paid properly.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Thanks for your reply! We work for a company that does service calls to primarily residences, so we drive pretty much all day as most of our service calls only take 15-30 minutes each. Since we're on the road so much, would this affect your answer?

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      • #4
        No, sorry. I'm not saying I agree with your employer but he does not appear to be violating any laws - about this anyway.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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