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Where can I find average "on-call" pay rate statistics? Pennsylvania

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  • #16
    Originally posted by JerryinPA View Post
    After I lost 84 hours of comp time 14 years ago, the management decided to start paying me OT, unless there was some reason that I wanted the time off right then... so I've just taken the pay for the last 13 years. So, I guess that the "comp time practice doesn't exist for me anymore.
    Yep, the company decided to pay you in accordance with the law. Given the comp time you had was so long ago, you are SOL about getting paid for that or any other money owed you that dates back more than three years.

    Sorry.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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    • #17
      ScottB

      [QUOTE=ScottB;817841]Unless you are in the public sector, you CANNOT get "comp time." If you ARE in the public sector (an area I am not familiar with), I don't think you can lose it.QUOTE]

      I am a little confused by this part. Only because I have seen on-call technicians in every type of company public/private work out comp time with their employers (although it may not be an actual policy).

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      • #18
        [quote=demartian;818012]
        Originally posted by ScottB View Post
        Unless you are in the public sector, you CANNOT get "comp time." If you ARE in the public sector (an area I am not familiar with), I don't think you can lose it.QUOTE]

        I am a little confused by this part. Only because I have seen on-call technicians in every type of company public/private work out comp time with their employers (although it may not be an actual policy).
        Many firm misuse the term "comp time". "Comp time" refers to additional time off instead of overtime compensation. This is only an option in the public sector NOT private sector (which most jobs fall).

        If the time is not legitimately compensable (i.e. certain on-call or non-compensable waiting time), the employer is free to create policy that gives an employee more than that is prescribed by law. I believe that is what happening in the scenario previously described.

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        • #19
          Sometimes, companies in the same industry share this information among themselves, or if they are a member of an industry association and contribute to surveys among the members, this question MIGHT be asked. However, such surveys are not normally available to employees or the public. IF they do so, they are doing it so that their compensation packages can remain competitive within the industry.

          FYI, we are a municipal government and we don't pay ANYTHING for on-call time, because, based on the circumstances surrounding the time, it is not compensable under the law and the unions have not negotiated it in any MOUs.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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