Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Minimum hours per Week? Oregon

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Minimum hours per Week? Oregon

    HI,
    I have been working only 5 hours per week and i heard that my employer has to give me at least 20 and not 25 because im a student is that right?

  • #2
    To the best of my knowledge the minimum number of scheduled hours per week for any worker is not addressed under labor code. This is set by company policy or the discretion of your boss. If you are unhappy about your work schedule, I'd suggest speaking with your boss to see if additional hours are available.

    Comment


    • #3
      There is no minimum hours an employer has to give anyone, let alone a student.

      Those under 18 years of age may have a maximum number of hours per week:

      Work Hours for Minors
      Hours of work for 14- & 15-year-olds when school is in session:

      Not during school hours.
      3 hours per day, 8 hours on non-school days.
      18 hours per week maximum.
      May work between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
      Fourteen- and 15-year-olds are not allowed to be employed during the hours their school is in session.

      Hours of work for 14- & 15-year-olds when school is not insession (from June 1 through Labor Day):

      8 hours per day.
      40 hours per week maximum.
      May work from 7am to 9pm.

      Hour of work for 16- & 17-year-olds, any time of the year:

      Any hour of the day.
      44 hour per week maximum.


      If you want more hours, ask for them.
      Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

      Comment


      • #4
        And regardless of whether you are a minor or not, the minimum number of hours you can legally be scheduled for is zero. Student status or not, there is no law in any state that mandates how many hours the employer must schedule you for.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cbg View Post
          And regardless of whether you are a minor or not, the minimum number of hours you can legally be scheduled for is zero. Student status or not, there is no law in any state that mandates how many hours the employer must schedule you for.
          Does this apply to full-time employees as well? i.e, if you're hired as full-time, but are scheduled less than 32 hours a week, is that legal?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jaywantscandy View Post
            Does this apply to full-time employees as well? i.e, if you're hired as full-time, but are scheduled less than 32 hours a week, is that legal?
            The employer can schedule you from zero hours to 168 hours in a work week, with a few exceptions.

            "Full time" is not defined by laws (there may be a few exceptions). The problem is, your company's benefit plans may specify who is full time and who is not in order to qualify them for the benefits.

            So, if you were hired on with the expectation of being able to get benefits, but you don't make enough hours to qualify, your problem won't be addressed by law, but only by you taking the issue up with your company (or you could walk -- your choice. I would be a little upset if I expected to get benefits and then was told that I could not because I don't work enough hours, even if I was willing and able to work more).
            Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

            Comment


            • #7
              So can an employee be classified as part-time, yet still working 40 hrs a week, so the company doesn't have to provide the same benefits it provides for it's other full-time employees that work in a different dept?

              Comment


              • #8
                If the employee is classified as part time SPECIFICALLY TO AVOID PAYING THEM BENEFITS they might have a legal claim.

                But a temporary increase in hours to 40 a week does not give a part time employee a claim for full time benefits.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment

                Working...
                X