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croocked employer and he won E.S.C.N.C appeals hearing North Carolina

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  • croocked employer and he won E.S.C.N.C appeals hearing North Carolina

    temporarily removed
    Last edited by Angie W; 07-05-2011, 03:49 PM.

  • #2
    Please somebody tell me wherei can find these guide lines and laws..Where are these rules in writing??

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    • #3
      Angie, you posted at close to midnight on the Saturday of a holiday weekend. When someone who knows the answer logs on, they will post it. This is not Time Warner/ operators are not standing by 24/7 to answer your call. I am by no means certain that what you are looking for is even available on line.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        temporarily removed
        Last edited by Angie W; 07-05-2011, 03:50 PM.

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        • #5
          Posting negative information about your employer on FB is a valid and legitimate reason to fire you. It does indicate a negative attitude as positive people do not make negative comments to 100 of their closest friends and family. It doesn't matter who's friend's sister's nanny shared the info with the boss. The point is that you made a nagative comment about your employer in a public forum (and FB is a public forum no matter how much you want it to be a private one) and decided to grant you your wish of ending your current situation. You have the right to complain but your employer has the right to fire you for doing so. People may do it all the time on FB but that does not mean their employers are legally obligated to overlook it.

          The state also does not care if your employer is as sweet as Mr. Rogers or Ghengis Khan. Interupting, and smirking may be rude but they hold exactly zero weight when it comes to determining your eligibility for benefits. It is not a sign he must be lying either. Hearing examiners aren't interested in witnesses who do not have first hand knowledge of the reason for termination. I'm not sure what your witness planned to testifyto but if it was anything other than the reason you were terminated, it doesn't matter.

          Warnings and policies do not need to be in writing. That is a best practice but no law requires it. No handbook could possibly cover everything that might get an employee fired.

          Your only option is to appeal the decision. If there were warnings prior to termination and you did not heed them, your chances of qualifying decrease. It does not matter that these warnings were verbal.
          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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          • #6
            temporarily removed
            Last edited by Angie W; 07-05-2011, 03:52 PM.

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