Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Moving to NY-will I be eligible for any subsidized training? Pennsylvania New York

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Moving to NY-will I be eligible for any subsidized training? Pennsylvania New York

    I am contemplating moving back to NY because there are no work opportunities here in PA and the state does not offer any re-training or work training programs, which NY does.

    Many years ago, when I had my own business in NY, which fell on hard times (I did not collect any unemployment), I was able to go to a NYS subsidized CDL driver 8 week-training course. It changed my life.

    Would something like this (maybe not the same course, but something else that would be considered an 'in demand' occupation in NY) be available to me if I move to NY, without be employed and without receiving unemployment?
    Thanks.

  • #2
    I'm thinking no.

    You aren't receiving UI benefits from PA now?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Pattymd View Post
      I'm thinking no.

      You aren't receiving UI benefits from PA now?
      No, I'm currently on workers comp. The job, though, pays less than minimum wage (it's a retail sales position (+commission) but there aren't enough people coming through the door to make enough commission to pay my bills).

      I'm hoping to find something better in my home state....

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JimmyJazz4 View Post
        ... pays less than minimum wage (it's a retail sales position (+commission)
        Not legally possible.

        http://www.dol.gov/compliance/topics...ommissions.htm

        Commissions and the Minimum Wage:

        Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employees covered by the Act who are paid on commission must be paid at least the minimum wage, just as employees who are paid by the hour or piece.
        "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
        Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by DAW View Post
          Yes, it's legally possible. The next paragraph reads:
          "Commissions and Overtime:

          Under the FLSA, employees covered by the Act must receive overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a workweek at a rate of at least one and one-half times their regular rate of pay. Their "regular rate of pay" includes commissions. "

          As long as the $6.00 per hour plus any commissions earned equal at least the minimum wage rate for the week, that's what the employee gets paid. If they don't reach that amount due to low sales commissions, then the company has to bump up the rate to the minimum wage rate.

          Comment


          • #6
            You are correct, but your statement was confusing. I can understand how DAW read it.

            Relative to retraining, does your injury preclude you from returning to the same type of work in the future? If so, vocational training MAY be available through work comp.
            Last edited by Pattymd; 05-28-2009, 07:58 AM.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Pattymd View Post
              Relative to retraining, does your injury preclude you from returning to the same type of work in the future? If so, vocational training MAY be available through work comp.
              Interesting. I'm still in treatment; a final decision hasn't been made.

              If I move from PA to NY and finish my treatment there, would I still have that possibility of vocational training through worker comp?

              Comment

              Working...
              X