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  • jibarosoy
    started a topic Training pay New Hampshire

    Training pay New Hampshire

    I was recently hired by a security company in MA to work in NH. They asked me to come in to their MA office to complete training. When I was hired I was given a form with my hr. wage and I signed it. I completed the initial training and another 16 hrs. of on the job training. When my first paycheck arrived it they paid me at 10.00 hr. for all this time. What's the law regarding this. They never told me about training pay.

  • Betty3
    replied
    Thanks, Patty. That does make more sense than filing two claims. (but I wasn't sure)

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  • Pattymd
    replied
    Since the "work" in MA was temporary and of assumedly short duration, any wage claim would probably be filed in NH.

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  • Betty3
    replied
    Usually labor law applies to the state where you did the training/work. You might have to contact the DOL in each state (Ma. it's the Attorney General's office) to see if you might have a wage claim.

    You can check back & see if someone else has another opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • jibarosoy
    replied
    Originally posted by Betty3 View Post
    Did you do part of your training (initial training) in Ma. & part (on the job training) at work site in NH?

    Yes, that is correct.

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  • Betty3
    replied
    Did you do part of your training (initial training) in Ma. & part (on the job training) at work site in NH?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pattymd
    replied
    However, if they didn't tell you before the training that you would be making a lower hourly rate for the training, you MAY have a claim for the difference. Contact the state Dept. of Labor and inquire.

    Leave a comment:


  • Betty3
    replied
    That should be legal since you were paid at least minimum wage for the training. (unless you have a binding employment contract or CBA guaranteeing a greater training rate than what you received)

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  • jibarosoy
    replied
    Training in NH

    Originally posted by DAW View Post
    You mentioned "security company". You did not mention what your normal job duties are. I am going to assume for the sake of discussion that you are a non-exempt employee doing something like the work a security guard would do. If so, it is extremely likely that you must be paid (on average) at least minimum wage for any particular work week for all hours worked. The training time is almost certainly "hours worked" under federal law (FLSA).

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs22.pdf
    Thanks for your prompt reply. Yes, I was hired as a security guard at a rate of 11.17 per hour. The training was 16 hrs of initial training for security guards for the company and additional 16 hrs. on the job (at the site where I will be stationed) training. They paid me for all 32 hrs. at a rate of 10.00 per hour claiming that it was training. Hope that's clear. Thanks

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  • jibarosoy
    replied
    Training in NH

    Thanks for your prompt reply. Yes, I was hired as a security guard at a rate of 11.17 per hour. The training was 16 hrs of initial training for security guards for the company and additional 16 hrs. on the job (at the site where I will be stationed) training. They paid me for all 32 hrs. at a rate of 10.00 per hour claiming that it was training. Hope that's clear. Thanks
    Last edited by jibarosoy; 11-24-2009, 05:42 PM.

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  • DAW
    replied
    You mentioned "security company". You did not mention what your normal job duties are. I am going to assume for the sake of discussion that you are a non-exempt employee doing something like the work a security guard would do. If so, it is extremely likely that you must be paid (on average) at least minimum wage for any particular work week for all hours worked. The training time is almost certainly "hours worked" under federal law (FLSA).

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs22.pdf

    Lectures, Meetings and Training Programs: Attendance at lectures, meetings, training programs and similar activities need not be counted as working time only if four criteria are met, namely: it is outside normal hours, it is voluntary, not job related, and no other work is concurrently performed.

    Leave a comment:

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