Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Breaks on the job/Nebraska

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Breaks on the job/Nebraska

    To: CBG

    You responded to a writer: "The only break required by either Federal or Nebraska law, is a Nebraska law requiring that any employee who works an 8 hour shift must be given a 30 minutes unpaid break, and even that law applies only to certain industries."

    Key words: "upaid break"

    On 9-16-06 Pattymd/Senior Member responded to another writer (Kjana01) there was a Federal Law providing that "breaks of less than 20 minutes must be paid."

    CBG -- Shouldn't you clarify your response to state that Nebraska Law provides for 30 minutes of unpaid break only if the break is in excess of 20 minutes?

  • #2
    Isn't 30 minutes in excess of 20?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      If I thought I should so stipulate, I would have done so. But since you already have, I don't see the need to duplicate your efforts.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

      Comment


      • #4
        nebraska breaks

        I Have A Question If You Are A Assistant Manager In A Fast Food Restaurant Do You Get Any Breaks My Boss Told Me I Dont Get Breaks So I Better Not Ask Him Again Please Help. I Live In Nebraska

        Comment


        • #5
          If you work for a fast food restaurant in any capacity in Nebraska the law does not require that you receive any breaks. You only get breaks if your employer decides to offer them.

          So if your employer has told you that you do not get breaks and not to ask him again, it's pretty safe to assume they have chosen not to offer them and you should not ask again.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment

          Working...
          X