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  • MA Offensive Photos

    I was asked to removed a photo from my desk because one person found it offensive. The photo have been on my desk in my office for 9 months, it happens to a picture of my girlfriend standing on a rock at the beach getting splashed by water. She is wearing a full halter top bathing suit with shorts as the bottom the focal point of the photo happens to be the wave splashing her not her. The question is how is reasonableness defined and can just anyone come in and complain and you have to remove the photo

  • #2
    Post the pic here and we can all decide if its innapropriate
    This will pass. Life's got bigger disapointments waiting for you.

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    • #3
      hehehe. If the employer deems it inappropriate, which they did, they are perfectly within their legal rights to require that you remove it. Keep it in your wallet.
      I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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      • #4
        Inappropriate Photo

        The employer did not deem that the photo was inappropriate. As a matter of fact everyone from the CEO, Vice President and Corporate Attorney has seen the photo and had nothing to say about it. I removed the photo as a goodwill gesture. It wasn't until this new employee arrived that it became inappropriate. My gut tells me that since she is a borderline employee on probation she is trying to set up a defense for herself.
        Last edited by tonyb; 03-29-2006, 10:06 AM. Reason: Add more info

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        • #5
          That may or may not be so. The fact remains that maneuvering the laws regarding exposure to offensive material is like walking on eggshells in combat boots. If the company feels the most appropriate response is to ask you to remove the photo, nothing in the law prohibits them from doing so.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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