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Giving two weeks notice Massachusetts

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  • Giving two weeks notice Massachusetts

    I gave two weeks notice to my job on 8/11 in writing to my boss noting that my last day was 8/25. She accepted my notice then. On Monday 8/14 i was told today was my last day and I'm not entitled to the two weeks pay. Is this correct. I'm leaving to be a stay at home mom not going to a competitor.

  • #2
    Your employer is entitled to accept your resignation early if they choose. They need not pay for time you did not work.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      I've heard that the company will also hold your last commission check for 6 weeks. Is that allowed by law??

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      • #4
        Not exactly. If the comission check is usually due quarterly or 6 weeks after the end of the pay period then yes, the employer may pay it when it would normally be due. In many cases it isn't possible to figure out what the commission will be on the spot. They may not hold the check just for the heck of it though.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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        • #5
          The commission is paid every two weeks. They supposedly hold the last one for 6 weeks. Is that allowed??

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          • #6
            Typically, not. Nevertheless, companies often do this because they want to make sure there's no clawback necessary. Is there a written policy in your commission plan explaining this?

            .
            Last edited by CompensationCounsel; 08-16-2006, 03:44 PM.
            This post is by Philip Gordon, a Massachusetts employment attorney (www.gordonllp.com).

            This post is NOT legal advice. It is for general/educational information purposes only. You should not rely on this post if you are making decisions, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. This post may be considered "advertising" under the MA professional rules for attorneys.

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