Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MD OT Laws

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MD OT Laws

    We recently aquired a business in Maryland and there are some managers here that believe that if an employee works a shift, any subsequent shift worked less than 12 hours after their shift ended the employer is required to pay OT. I did some research and the only OT law I can find is any hours worked over 40 in a 7 day period. Are the managers thinking of a Child Labor Law? Any assistance is welcome!
    Thanks

  • #2
    I don't know what they're thinking of but whatever it is, they're mistaken.

    Ask them to show you a link to the law they're thinking of.

    P.S. What industry is the business? Very occasionally, there are industry specific laws that do not fall under employment law.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      No, there is nothing in MD that would require that. http://www.dllr.state.md.us/labor/wa...wptermsset.htm
      I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

      Comment


      • #4
        This questions comes up a lot and I've been trying to figure out where this myth comes from. I believe it's part of a lot of CBAs. I've worked at hospitals that did this to encourage nurses to work extra shifts (nursing shortage back in the 80's that left and came back again).

        I can't find anywhere that it was ever a law in any state. Often when employers implement policies that go above and beyond legal requirements, especially a lot of them in similar industries, employees end up believing it was labor law that required the practice.

        Comment


        • #5
          Another example of the same thing is the myth that employer are prohibited from giving any information in a reference check except for dates of employment, job title and salary. There is no such law and there never was any such law, but because so many employers use that as a policy many employees have come to believe it's the law.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment


          • #6
            No special industry- manufacturing.
            Thanks for the responses. That's what I thought but I wanted to double check.

            Comment

            Working...
            X