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  • OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

    I started my price book. Now I can get the lowest price on beef tenderloin
    around! You had mentioned cookbook(s) that you liked with small number of
    cheap ingredients. I am looking not only for the best price on a thing, but
    also the lowest total cost of groceries. My google impairment prevents me
    from being able to find the place where you originally mentioned a cookbook
    that you like for this sort of thing.

    Incidentally, we are now eating plenty of chicken pieces (cheaper than
    boneless boob to my DH's dismay).

    Thanks.



  • #2
    OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

    Stephanie wrote:
    I started my price book. Now I can get the lowest price on beef tenderloin around! You had mentioned cookbook(s) that you liked with small number of cheap ingredients. I am looking not only for the best price on a thing, but also the lowest total cost of groceries. My google impairment prevents me from being able to find the place where you originally mentioned a cookbook that you like for this sort of thing. Incidentally, we are now eating plenty of chicken pieces (cheaper than boneless boob to my DH's dismay). Thanks.
    I probably mentioned the "More with Less Cookbook," which is an
    oldy-but-goody by now from the Mennonite Church. I think it's a really
    great A-Z cookbook that packs a ton of recipies into a small footprint,
    and I like the balance between fairly familiar "comfort food" type
    recipes and mildly ethnic fare (gleaned from Mennonite missionary
    communities throughout the world) that doesn't require you to go out and
    buy a bottle of thai fish sauce, only to have the toddler turn up the
    nose and demand chicken nuggets.

    Try out the boneless skinless chicken thighs, btw, if you see them at a
    good price! They're usually cheaper than bls/sknls boobs, *and* they
    taste better, IMHO. They work well in stir fries and so on where the
    ease of boneless is a consideration.

    Comment


    • #3
      OT is ping Kathy: cookbook


      "DrLith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
      news:[email protected]
      Stephanie wrote:
      I started my price book. Now I can get the lowest price on beef tenderloin around! You had mentioned cookbook(s) that you liked with small number of cheap ingredients. I am looking not only for the best price on a thing, but also the lowest total cost of groceries. My google impairment prevents me from being able to find the place where you originally mentioned a cookbook that you like for this sort of thing. Incidentally, we are now eating plenty of chicken pieces (cheaper than boneless boob to my DH's dismay). Thanks.
      I probably mentioned the "More with Less Cookbook," which is an oldy-but-goody by now from the Mennonite Church. I think it's a really great A-Z cookbook that packs a ton of recipies into a small footprint, and I like the balance between fairly familiar "comfort food" type recipes and mildly ethnic fare (gleaned from Mennonite missionary communities throughout the world) that doesn't require you to go out and buy a bottle of thai fish sauce, only to have the toddler turn up the nose and demand chicken nuggets. Try out the boneless skinless chicken thighs, btw, if you see them at a good price! They're usually cheaper than bls/sknls boobs, *and* they taste better, IMHO. They work well in stir fries and so on where the ease of boneless is a consideration.
      That's the one! Thanks!


      Comment


      • #4
        OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

        In article <[email protected]>,
        DrLith <[email protected]> wrote:
        Stephanie wrote:
        I started my price book. Now I can get the lowest price on beef tenderloin around! You had mentioned cookbook(s) that you liked with small number of cheap ingredients. I am looking not only for the best price on a thing, but also the lowest total cost of groceries. My google impairment prevents me from being able to find the place where you originally mentioned a cookbook that you like for this sort of thing. Incidentally, we are now eating plenty of chicken pieces (cheaper than boneless boob to my DH's dismay). Thanks.
        I probably mentioned the "More with Less Cookbook," which is an oldy-but-goody by now from the Mennonite Church. I think it's a really great A-Z cookbook that packs a ton of recipies into a small footprint, and I like the balance between fairly familiar "comfort food" type recipes and mildly ethnic fare (gleaned from Mennonite missionary communities throughout the world)
        Being raised in an area of German influence, including the largest
        concentration of Amish in the world, this cookbook was a staple for us,
        the same as the food included in the recipes. My mother got all of the
        siblings a copy. Unfortunately, the ex got it in the divorce. But, when
        I was home visiting, I was able to pick up a new copy. I liked the old
        one, as it was spiral, so you could keep the page you were using on top.

        Another great book, in the same vein, was/is Mrs. Miller's Cookbook. she
        ran a dining room out of the basement of her home, that fed busloads at
        a time. If you were lucky enough, you too could enjoy the food if you
        stopped by while the bus was there. I doubt if it still around, but if
        it is you might look at it as well. It may have been printed locally and
        not available nationwide. I have two things I really relish out of that
        one, catsup and sweet relish (now made with Splenda instead of sugar).

        GGG

        --
        To contact me: [email protected]

        Comment


        • #5
          OT is ping Kathy: cookbook



          GGGNH wrote:
          Being raised in an area of German influence, including the largest concentration of Amish in the world, this cookbook was a staple for us, the same as the food included in the recipes.
          I have a cookbook that I love that I bought at a grocery store in
          central/almost northern Indiana. It is a book that was made up and
          published by a group of Amish women (what is it with the Amish and
          cooking? :P~) and it's chock full of normal, everyday recipes that,
          like someone already mentioned, you don't have to go on a scavenger
          hunt for ingredients. ('Waddya mean the grocery store on the corner
          doesn't carry rendered duck fat? It should be right between the
          Oscar Mayer bologna and the Old-Fashioned loaf!)

          My two favorite parts of it is the description of the preparations
          for an Amish wedding (something like 'We fry up 50 chickens and bake
          100 pies) and the recipe on how to make 100 pounds of bologna.

          Tracey

          Comment


          • #6
            OT is ping Kathy: cookbook


            "Stephanie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
            news:[email protected]
            I started my price book.
            This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?


            Now I can get the lowest price on beef tenderloin
            around! You had mentioned cookbook(s) that you liked with small number of cheap ingredients. I am looking not only for the best price on a thing, but also the lowest total cost of groceries. My google impairment prevents me from being able to find the place where you originally mentioned a cookbook that you like for this sort of thing. Incidentally, we are now eating plenty of chicken pieces (cheaper than boneless boob to my DH's dismay). Thanks.

            Comment


            • #7
              OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

              On Fri 19 Aug 2005 08:35:54p, Joy wrote:
              I started my price book. This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?
              hehehe... I started to type exactly that question, and then though.. wait
              a minute... what if someone already asked and it'd been answered.

              So, don't feel bad, if it's a stupid question, I'm stupid too.
              --
              Cal~

              calliope 123 at gmail dot com

              Comment


              • #8
                OT is ping Kathy: cookbook



                Joy wrote:
                This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?
                Simplified answer: It's a book in which you record the prices
                of items in different stores so that you can tell if it's a
                good deal or not. For example, you're at Costco and see some
                kind of meat on sale for $6.59 a lb. You look in your book and
                say 'Hey, but at Mr. Murphy's down the road, it's *always*
                $6.59 a lb so I don't need to buy 200 lbs of it here.'

                Tracey

                Comment


                • #9
                  OT is ping Kathy: cookbook


                  "Tracey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                  news:[email protected]
                  Joy wrote:
                  This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?
                  Simplified answer: It's a book in which you record the prices of items in different stores so that you can tell if it's a good deal or not. For example, you're at Costco and see some kind of meat on sale for $6.59 a lb. You look in your book and say 'Hey, but at Mr. Murphy's down the road, it's *always* $6.59 a lb so I don't need to buy 200 lbs of it here.'
                  You mean you're supposed to go around to different stores and write prices
                  down? That sounds like a lot of work. Speaking only for myself, I
                  generally only shop at a couple of places, and I tend to buy the same stuff
                  regularly - so it isn't too hard for me to remember that the soup I like is
                  cheaper at WalMart, but Kroger carries the brand of coconut milk I like. (I
                  don't know that I've *ever* paid $6.59/# for meat - maybe I'd feel different
                  if I bought more expensive stuff).


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    OT is ping Kathy: cookbook



                    Joy wrote:
                    "Tracey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
                    Joy wrote:
                    This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?
                    Simplified answer: It's a book in which you record the pricesof items in different stores so that you can tell if it's agood deal or not. For example, you're at Costco and see somekind of meat on sale for $6.59 a lb. You look in your book andsay 'Hey, but at Mr. Murphy's down the road, it's *always*$6.59 a lb so I don't need to buy 200 lbs of it here.'
                    You mean you're supposed to go around to different stores and write prices down?
                    Not necessarily, although you could. You could also keep your receipt
                    and just copy it over in the comfort of your own home.
                    That sounds like a lot of work.
                    It is a bit of work but if your goal is to save money where you can,
                    that's what you have to do. It's not cost effective to buy something
                    that you see on sale in KMart one day, for instance, if the same item
                    is sold daily at a lower price in the WalMart you go to.
                    Speaking only for myself, I generally only shop at a couple of places, and I tend to buy the same stuff regularly - so it isn't too hard for me to remember that the soup I like is cheaper at WalMart, but Kroger carries the brand of coconut milk I like.
                    Well, here there are *tons* of places that we shop. We have the Navy
                    Commissary, the Air Force Commissary (although their prices are usually
                    close enough for us), then all of the little PXes that around, then
                    there are the civilian grocery stores that we might go to because
                    they're closer than the military ones then there's Costco where we
                    will usually just buy things for the convenient bigger sizes or things
                    that aren't available in the Commissaries. And not to forget KMart and
                    other stores like that.
                    (I don't know that I've *ever* paid $6.59/# for meat - maybe I'd feeldifferent if I bought more expensive stuff).
                    You've never bought *any* kind of lunch meat like roast beef or turkey
                    breast from the deli? If you have, then you've paid $6 plus per lb for
                    it.

                    But it's not only expensive stuff. Pennies add up.

                    Tracey
                    <whose son moved into his dorm yesterday so she's been drumming that
                    into his brain lately>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OT is ping Kathy: cookbook


                      "Tracey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                      news:[email protected]
                      Joy wrote:
                      "Tracey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
                      Joy wrote:>This might be a stupid question, but what is a price book?Simplified answer: It's a book in which you record the pricesof items in different stores so that you can tell if it's agood deal or not. For example, you're at Costco and see somekind of meat on sale for $6.59 a lb. You look in your book andsay 'Hey, but at Mr. Murphy's down the road, it's *always*$6.59 a lb so I don't need to buy 200 lbs of it here.'
                      You mean you're supposed to go around to different stores and write prices down?
                      Not necessarily, although you could. You could also keep your receipt and just copy it over in the comfort of your own home.
                      That sounds like a lot of work.
                      It is a bit of work but if your goal is to save money where you can, that's what you have to do. It's not cost effective to buy something that you see on sale in KMart one day, for instance, if the same item is sold daily at a lower price in the WalMart you go to.
                      Speaking only for myself, I generally only shop at a couple of places,and I tend to buy the same stuff regularly - so it isn't too hard for meto remember that the soup I like is cheaper at WalMart, but Kroger carriesthe brand of coconut milk I like.
                      Well, here there are *tons* of places that we shop. We have the Navy Commissary, the Air Force Commissary (although their prices are usually close enough for us), then all of the little PXes that around, then there are the civilian grocery stores that we might go to because they're closer than the military ones then there's Costco where we will usually just buy things for the convenient bigger sizes or things that aren't available in the Commissaries. And not to forget KMart and other stores like that.
                      (I don't know that I've *ever* paid $6.59/# for meat - maybe I'd feeldifferent if I bought more expensive stuff).
                      You've never bought *any* kind of lunch meat like roast beef or turkey breast from the deli? If you have, then you've paid $6 plus per lb for it.
                      Kroger has a perfectly acceptable smoked turkey for $4.99/pound, and a
                      couple types of ham/beef/pastrami in the same price range (it is the Kroger
                      brand stuff, but really it is just as good as the more expensive types).
                      WalMart has some brands that are even cheaper - I'm pretty sure I've bought
                      smoked turkey there for $2.99 - $3.99/ pound. That said, you're probably
                      right - surely there has been _some_ occasion when I've bought some
                      expensive lunch meat, but it sure wouldn't be the norm - we just aren't big
                      sandwich eaters. For that matter, I rarely buy loaf bread or sandwich
                      rolls - we just don't eat much of it. We do eat french bread fairly
                      regularly, but again Kroger has this great bake-it-yourself loaf in the deli
                      section - the dough is already formed and risen, you just pop it into the
                      oven for a few minutes and you've got quite a good loaf for $1.50.




                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

                        In article <[email protected]>, Tracey <[email protected]>
                        wrote:
                        My two favorite parts of it is the description of the preparations for an Amish wedding (something like 'We fry up 50 chickens and bake 100 pies) and the recipe on how to make 100 pounds of bologna.
                        And how to make potato and egg salad, cole slaw, and tapioca pudding in
                        33 gallon containers? :-)

                        GGG

                        --
                        To contact me: [email protected]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

                          On Sat 20 Aug 2005 11:50:46a, GGGNH wrote:
                          And how to make potato and egg salad, cole slaw, and tapioca pudding in 33 gallon containers? :-)
                          Thanks big guy.. you just gave me flashbacks to why I no longer eat cole
                          slaw from a resturant.

                          Picture a guy mixing cole slaw in a giant plastic trash barrel, by shoving
                          his hands and arms way down into the bottom of the barrel, and when he
                          comes up, he's got cole slaw up under his arm pits. Yuck. (double yuck,
                          cuz it was the ex- at 17)

                          --
                          Cal~

                          calliope 123 at gmail dot com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            OT is ping Kathy: cookbook


                            "-Calliope-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                            news:[email protected]
                            Picture a guy mixing cole slaw in a giant plastic trash barrel, by shoving his hands and arms way down into the bottom of the barrel, and when he comes up, he's got cole slaw up under his arm pits. Yuck. (double yuck, cuz it was the ex- at 17)
                            And your arms were freezing and sticky all the way up to your armpits by the
                            time you were done, too-even if you were double gloved.

                            Jess


                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OT is ping Kathy: cookbook

                              On Sat 20 Aug 2005 12:05:10p, Jess wrote:
                              And your arms were freezing and sticky all the way up to your armpits by the time you were done, too-even if you were double gloved.
                              Gloved? Honey, we're talking 1976 here... they didn't wear no stinkin'
                              gloves!

                              And currently, I don't know of any gloves that would go all the way up to
                              and over someone's armpits. No way would I eat anyone's cole slaw, other
                              than my moms. Yumm.

                              (****, why isn't my daughter ready to go, yet!!?)

                              --
                              Cal~

                              calliope 123 at gmail dot com

                              Comment

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