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What if any Illinois/Federal laws may cover abuse and harassment that is not sexual?

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  • What if any Illinois/Federal laws may cover abuse and harassment that is not sexual?

    My male employer has been "picking on" a specific female employee for quite a while. He has written her up for various infractions. Sometimes, it's the same things over and over, while they may have some semblance of legitimacy, I'm no expect, but is this a form of harassment? She has been written up at least 10 or more times, and the write ups can cover anything from tardiness to taking too long in the bathroom. My employer has had several opportunities to terminate this employee, and does not because he has stated that he wants her to quit. If she quits, she doesn't receive un-employement. He has told her that it may be to her benefit to find employment elsewhere, but she refuses to quit. He has cut her hours several times. He stated that he will continue to do so until she falls below the minimum required to keep health insurance coverage. If she comes in 1 minute late, he makes her wait 1 hour before allowing her to punch in. He talks about her to the other employees in a negative way. He speaks to her in a beligerant fashion, yelling and using profanity. Also, these write ups have not been placed in her personnel file. She has asked for copies, but cannot obtain them. The person who handles payroll/personnel records has asked my employer for these documents, but is told not to worry about it. What is the law & what should be done. This is not the only employee with issues. Please help!
    Last edited by meridian97; 01-13-2006, 11:11 AM. Reason: typos

  • #2
    It depends on WHY he is treating her like this. I don't want to put words in your mouth; if you had to guess, what reason would you guess?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      WHY does he treat her this way? My first thought above anything else, even him hating her, would be that he gets a thrill out of treating her that way. To him it's fun. We have a female warehouse supervisor. OOH sorry, we must refer to her as a warehouse coordinator. They both like to play games like this. The warehouse coordinator will go and tell the worker what a good job she's doing. Then minutes later my employer will call the worker into his office and express his displeasure at something she did (possibly not putting msde away fast enough, after specifically telling her to stop putting mdse away and pack customer orders). He sends her back to work and them goes to the warehouse coordinator and gives a thumbs up and says that's how you treat her. He did this front of myself and two other employees.
      My second thought is he hates her. I will admit that this worker can rile him up like no other. She used to breakdown and cry everytime he confronted her, but now she stands up to him. She has been with the company since before he took over for his father, so she's knows where all the bodies are buried. Both have a hard time accepting fault and they both think they know everything. Identical personalities.
      What I do not understand, is why not just terminate her. Isn't Illinois what they call an at will state.
      One thing I have noticed is that if he goes after you, it is safer not to respond to his verbal tirades (very profane)in any way, he gets more visibly and physically angry. If you respond, you allow him the control he seeks. And control he must have over everything. I've experienced this first hand.
      Last edited by meridian97; 01-13-2006, 03:05 PM. Reason: typos

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      • #4
        The reasons you suggest do not create an illegal harassment situation. It's a shame he's so unprofessional, but being unprofessional does not violate the law.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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